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Rogue River courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 19??-1918, October 29, 1918, DAILY EDITION, Image 1

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DAILY EDITION
VOli. IX1., No. 30.
GKAHTV PAM, J08EPHIXB OOCTY, OREGON. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 89, 1918.
WHOLE NUMBER 2501.
NEW AUSTRIAN
PEACE NOTE
IS RECEIVED
WHILE AUSTRIAN'S (X)TIMK TO
HGIIT WEAKLY IN SOUTH,
THEV CRY FOR PEACE
niri
HAYS
ANSWERS WIL
SOU
s
CRUSHING POLITICAL DEFEAT
lUvlf Viewed la lxndon aa "I' neon
dlftonal Hurmnikr and Itrmove
DouM About Hun Defeat"
Umiloj, rt. StM The Even-
tag Nw says that the alllra
will lanUt upon IliK surreudnr
of llwi (irrmaa flw. Including
all ilia submarine, and the oc- 4
4 rupatiun Ihy Ue allies of . all
4 fortified town oa the Rhine 4
-
4 farin, Oct, a Vienna news- 4
4 paiwf-a declare that Germany 4
4 and! Aunti-tit-Hungary will caplt- 4
4 ulate without delay. 4
Washington. Oct. 29. Ths new
Austrian note, asking Cor an armls
ttce and peace, has been recolved.
To text l Identical with that cabled
by the 'Associated Press from Basel
yesterday.
London, Oct. 29. Auatrla'a reply
to the president la viewed aa uncon
ditional surrender. The Telegraph
says:
"It remove any lingering doubt
m to the total defeat of Germany
for which, besides tolng a moat
grave military misfortune, It In
yolves an ultimate crushing military
defeat, as It destroys the monstrous
fabric known aa Pan-Germanism."
Copenhagen, Oct. 29. Archduke
Joseph haa Issued a proclamation
stating that Emperor Charles of Aus
trla has charged him with the task
of securing the complete Indepen
donee of Hungary, according to
Budapest dispatch.
Copenhagen, Oct. 29. An inde
pendent anti-dynasties state haa been
formed In Hungary, under the lead
ership of Count Michael Karolyl, In
agreement with the Czechs and Slav
niana, according to Vienna reports.
In a speech at Budapest, Karolyl de
clared he had presented his program
to Emperor Charles, who refused to
accept. Karolyl thereupon put . Into
effect his plan for an independent
state.
Haya IVmldent Haa Ceatloned the
Motives and Fidelity of ItepublW
ran in Congress
New York. Oct. 29 Will H. Hays,
chairman of the republican national
committee, made public bers a state
ment In which be replied in behalf
of his party to President Wilson's
appeal to the nation to return a
democratic congress. In bis state
ment Mr. Hays said:
"President Wilson baa questioned
the motives and fidelity of your rep
resentatives in congress. He bas
thereby Impugned their loyalty and
denied their patriotism. His chal
lenge Is to you who elected thoae
representatives. You owe It to them,
to the honor of your great party and
to your own self-respect to meet that
challenge aquarely, not only as re
publicans, but as Americana. I. as
your chairman, call upon you to do
It.
"Mr. Wilson accords the republi
cans no credit whatever for having
supported the 'war, measures' pro
posed by his administration although
they have done so with greater
unanimity than the members of hla
own party. Despite that fact he ac
cuses them ot having tried to usurp
his proper functions.
At no time, In no way, have they
tried to tajes the control.of the wsr
out of his hsnds. The president
knows that. Ths country knows It.
You know It. It Is an Insult, not only
to every loyal republican In congress,
but to every loyal republican In the
land. It fully merits ths resentment
which rightfully and surely will find
expression at the polls.
"Mr. Wilson grudgingly sdmlts
that the republicans have been 'pro
war.' Then why does he demand
their defeat? Because they are still
pro-war? Hardly that; no. It is
because they are for peace though,
not without, victory. Because they
do not believe laating peace can be
obtained through negotiations; he
cause they consider that U. S.'
atands for unconditional surrender
as well as for the United States and
Uncle Sam. The democratic party
does not. Mr. Wilson does not.
There Is the Issue, clear as tl noon
day sun. The country will decide. '
"Mr. Wilson wants only rubber
stamps his rubber stamps in con
gress. He says so. No one knows
it better than democratic congress
men "But Mr. Wilson's real purpose
has nothing to do with the conduct
or the war. He haa had that from
the beginning, has it now, and no-
SeiM BROKEN
American, French, British and Italians AD Swing on The
Austriaus-Advance on 30 Mile Front, Cct Main Com
munication Lines and Take 15,000 Prisoners
With the Allies on the Piave, Oct.
29. The Austrians have been dealt
a smashing blow by the allies, who
bsve made new advances, pushing
forward as far as Vayolla, whlob
was taken by the Italians.
TURKEY PRESENTS
PEACE PROPOSALS
Would Settle Matters Independently
of Germany, Whose Federal
Council Would 111 Constitution
London, Oct 29. Turkey has in
dependent! presented peace pro
posals to the entente nations, ac
cording to a Constantinople report.
Negotiations are expected to
soon, It Is admitted.
ON THE YANKS
POISON GAS AND HIGH EXPLO
SIVES USED, BUT AMERICANS
REPLY WITH BIG GUNS
end
front, between ConegUano and Oder
zo, where the allies have . advanced
three miles. Troops and supplies are
being rushed up end the allies evi
dently Intend to force the offensive
to the utmost.
East of the Oise the French are
encircling Guise.
The British along the Tigris river
in Mesopotamia, have again defeat
ed the Turks and have advanced 10
miles. . .
With the Allies on ths Plavs. Oct
29. The last lines of Austro-Hun-
garlan resistance on the central po
sitions along the Plave were broken
yesterday by the British, French and
Italians.
Italian Headquarters, Oct. 29.
Paris. Oct. 28. The allies main- ConegUano bas been captured by
tain their progress east of the Plave the allied forces, and the whole al
and have taken over 15,000 prls- "ed line bas advanced
oners. '
The allies are now threatening Rome, Oct. 29. The battle on the
the Important railway points of Con-i Plave is continuing notoriously for
egllano and Oderxo, and are within , the allies. The Italians have storm-
two miles of both. They also threat-jed the heights of Dobbla Dende ana
en two of the three railway lines sup-: have entered Susegano. Numerous
Copenhagen, Oct. 29. The Ger
man federal council has approved a
bill amending the Imperial constltu
tlon in form as adopted by the Telch-
atag, says a Berlin telegram. The
reichst&g bill places the military au
thorities under control of the civil
government, and Ludendorff's retire
ment Is reported to be due to this.
Athens, Oct. 29. Rioting
broken out at Constantinople
Smyrna, It Is reported." The
mans were attacked) In both
cities.
porting ths Austro-Hungarlans.
The allied forces havs also thrown
their forees serosa the Plave on a
guns have been taken.
, The French, stormed Mont Pton
arbi. Over .4.000 prisoners were
SO mile front. The heaviest fight-. taken yesterday and have been
tng is being done along a seven mile counted.
GREAT IMPROVEMENTS
IN FLYING MACHINES "
tance flying, however, he continued,
it would be necessary to evolve
silent engine, tor the public would
not be willing to take lengthy trips
noisy airplanes.
EVANS CREEK TO FORM
oe AN IRRIGATION DISTRICT
has . . , .
London, Oct. 29. No other
velopmont in human history
shown so remarkable reauits as nas farmers of the Evans Creek
nying m tne last iu years, says wra dlBtrlct wiu Tote npon tne creation
Montagu of Beaulleu, a British sci- of M lrrgation district on October
enlist and aviation expert. ;3i tne Med ford Tribune, fh
"When the. Wright brothers visit- pr0p08ei district will include land
ed Europe ten years ago, ne said, ,a the Evana Creek district, now wat-
"the airplane engines were or u- ered by tne tiow of tne itream, and
horse power. Today they are ot 750 otner Und fining . It is proposed
horse power in some cases ana tne t0 additional water by the
airplane's carrying capacity oas in- construction of storage reservoirs to
creased from about 128 pounds to sappiement the stream flow at a cost
Stt tons. '0f from $250,000 to $300,000.
' Ten thousand feet was tnen tne
hlRhest flight
26,000
.1
Today we are doing
And while 40 miles an hour WILL ATTEMPT TO SECURE
REDUCED RATES ON CHROME
The application for reduced rates
I may not on chrome ore from southern Ore'
is son points to 'Baltimore, Md., and
TRICK OF COPPER TO
STAY AT 26 CENTS
Washington, Oct. 28. President
Wilson today approved a continuance
of the present price of copper at 26
cents a pound until January 1.
MONSTER
GUNS
OF
All
si;
IA
1
NO PEACE TALK ON THE
MANY B&TTLE FRONTS
Washington, Oct. 29. While both
Germany and Austria are seeking to
sweure a cessation of hostilities and
Turkey also is reported to be fav
orably disposed toward peace, the
entente allied troops on all the bat
tle fronts are giving no heed to
peace proposals, but are continuing
without mercy to drive their foes be
fore them.
And in all the battle cones the
allies are meeting with marked suc
cess. In France the German battle
line Is slowly disintegrating under
violence of the allied offensive.
was then the highest speed, today we
are approaching 160.
"The British army in France be
gan with only 36 planes.
give the number today, but It
body dreams of Interfering with his. huge." j other eastern points Is now before
control. He wants Just two things. Long flights to and from Amerl- the Portland district freight traffic
One is full power to settle tne war.ca, tor instance woum oe possioie committee or tne rauroaa aaminis
precisely as be and his sole, unelect- after the war. Lord Montagu said, tration. 1 Those desiring to present
ed, unappotnted, unconfirmed per-1 adding that he himself hoped some their views must do so in writing be-
sonal adviser may determine. The day to' fly to India. For long-dls- fore November 5. Medford Tribune,
other is full power as the unembar
rassed spokesman In affairs at home,
as he actually demands in his state
ment to reconstruct in peace times
the great industrial affairs of the na
tion In the same way, In unimpeded
conformity with whatever socialistic
dortrlns, whatever unlimited gov
ernment ownership notions, what
ever ha.zy whims may happen to pos
sess him at the time, hut first and
above all with absolute commitment
to tree trade with all the world, thus
giving to Germany out ot hand the
fruits of a victory greater than she
could win by fighting a hundred
years. A republican congress win
never assent to that. Do you want
a congress that will? Germany
does."
SHATTER THE ENTIRE GERMAN
R
has
and
Ger-the
CASUALTY LIST
The following casualties are re
ported by the commanding general
ot ' the American expeditionary
fnrcpa for tnAar'
Killed In action .. , . . &
Missing in action .. 65
Wounded severely . 99
Died of wounds 43
Died of accident 10
Died of disease 92
Wounded, degree undetermtned-145
Wounded slightly . . 40
Prisoners 2
n
MMH
TARGETS 1 15 MILES AM
British is Bitter Fight Northwest of
Famais Pebeny's Forces Clos
In oa City of Guise
With the Americans Northwest of
Verdun, Oct. 29. The enemy open-
ed a furious bombardment with gas
and high explosive shells this mora- .
lng. The American artillery re
sponded. The American patrols are
active.
In connection wltn this general
movement the Americans northwest
ot Verdun have begun aa operation
which possibly may have important,
results. For the first time since the
Americans entered the wsr they havs '
opened fire against the back lines of'
the enemy with their new long-range
guns and are now heavily bombard-.
lng Longuyon, soma IS miles' dls-.
tant from" the American first-line po
sitions. Should the blasting process'
prove effective in' blazing '. S ' trail
along the Meuse for a quick advance
by the Americans, It !s-not Improb
able that a German retreat from the
region east of St. Quentin, northeast-'
ward of Luiembnrg will be necessitated.
Total .
....550
YOCKOXERS ARE LEAVING -
ALASKA FOR THE' WINTER
Juneau, Alaska, ' Oct 11. (By
Mail). Alaska's old stampede spir
it Is showing in a rush to the outside
this fall. Many northerners now
flocking back to the states don't
know where they are going but they
are on their way, declared Governor
Thomas Riggs, Jr., ot (Alaska when
he returned here recently from a
tour of the territory.
Reports ot high wages on the out
side, it is . said, are drawing many
south. This fall's unprecedented ex
odus will reduce the territory's
white population to about 19,000,
the governor predicted.
Governor Riggs declared he de
plored the spirit of unrest sweeping
Alaska but asserted he believed the
many who are going out now will
return when the war ends.
I Washington, Oct. 29. The Amer
ican troops are on the verge of ac
tive participation In a great war on '
the third major front. This was
the interpretation of the news from'
Italian headquarters that the Amer
icans were standing In reserve be- -hind
the British and Italian forces,
now drawing across the Plave river.
Paris, Oct. 29. General Debeny's
First army continues to close in on
Guise and have captured the German
first line trenches and barracks and
hospital In Guise. South of Guise
the French have passed beyond the
Louvry farm, and also continue to
progress on the right bank of the
rPeron river.
With the British Armies, Oct. 29.
Bttter fighting la going on today
northwest of Famars and south' of)
Valenciennes. . . . .
REQUIREMENTS OF 8. A. T. C.
ENTRANCE ARE CHANGED
T
With ths American Army North- Its range probably is not so gret
INFORMATION FURNISHED
In San Francisco and other cities
where great numbers of soldiers col
lect the War Camp Community Ser
vice is establishing Information bu
reaus for their use.
west ot Verdun, Oct. 29. 'American
long-range guns yesterday afternoon
began firing on Longuyon.'
The town ot Longuyon. is 23 miles
northeast ot Verdun. The American
long-ran i t'.re is also being direct
ed against the vital Voled-Rocade. on
the railway line paralleling ' the
front. The Germans are depending
on this road to shut their troops
and supplies from one point to an
other. '. . ') ,
Ths caliber of the gun is not an
nounced as yet, but the gun can
shoot many miles. The weapon is
said to be Infinitely more formidable
than the big guns with which the
Germans bombarded Paris, though
The results ot the bombardment
have not yet been announced.
For days the long-range guns
have been on the American secto.1,
maneuvering for position from which
they might successfully bombard the
Sedan-Carl gnan-Montmedy-Longuyon
line.
The cutting ot thlg line, toward
which the Americans have been
pressing constantly, would mean the
virtual collapse of the entire Ger
man front to the Dutch border. Even
to Interrupt the railroad intermit
tently would be a huge gain, since
most ot the German relief divisions
sent against the Americans have
been brought In over that line.
University of Oregon, Eugene, 0:t,
29. Men over 18, with or Without
high school diplomas, will now be
admitted to the S. A. T. C. at the
university, following word received
from the committee on education
and spectal training in Washington,
D. C, October 24.
"In order to maintain authorized
quota ot your limit, induct if forms
are avallableeligible applicants tor
S. A. T. C. to replace vacancies caus
ed by transfer to officers' training
schools,' the telegram reads.
The men must be 18 and must be
able to pass the physical examination
and demonstrate to the examining
board that they have the necessary
qualifications to keep np with the
class work In the S. A. T. C.
TRIAL OF CAILLAUX AND
TWO DEPUTIES HAS BEGUN
Paris, Oct. 29. The trial of ex
Premier Caillaux and two deputies
has begun by the French senate.
s
As proof that the "dirt" around
Leland contains platinum, as well as
gold, C. F. Foss, of Leland, brought
to the Courier office today a letter
from Baker & Co., ot Newark, N. J.,
written to H. K. Miller ot Leland.
The letter In part, follows:
"We are enclosing herewith a
check tor $52.06, representing the
value of your shipment ot crude plat
inum. We have placed a value of
$82.51 per ounce on your material,
which contained 71.2 per cent plat
inum, and 16.4 per cent osmi-lrld-lum,
payment tor the former being
at the rate of $105 per troy- ounce
and tor the latter $47.25 per ounce."
This platinum, states Mr. Foss,
was taken from the old gold sluice
boxes several years ago by Mr. Mil
ler, who only recently sent it In.
The land now belongs to the Oregon
Land & Power Co., ' whose head
quarters are at Cleveland, Ohio. Mr.
Foss states that the whole Leland
district Is rich with gold and plat
inum bearing dirt.

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