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Rogue River courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 19??-1918, November 11, 1918, DAILY EDITION, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96088180/1918-11-11/ed-1/seq-2/

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rAGB TWO
i.ult noGca buyem cockiui
Monday, xoyiimiikh ii. ioin
Published Dally Except Saturday
a. E. VOORHIES. Pub. and Propr.
Waters 1 at poetofflce, Grants Pass.
Cre., as second olaaa mall matur.
ADVERTISING RATF3
HidIs? sosee. or Inch l&t
l,oeal-psraonal colli ma, .per Una 10c
hudm. uar line 6c
DAILY COURIER
y maU or carrier, per year....l.W)
tsy mall or carrier, p.r month- .&u
WKrKLT COoKlER
y.matl, per year $1.50
MEMBER Of ASSOCIATED PREsw
The Associated Press Is exoluslTely
atltied to the use (or republicatloa
f all newt dlspatohes csedlted to K
r not otherwise credited In this
.-per and also the local newa pub
lished herein.
All rights of ropubllcatlon of spe
cial dlspntches herein are also
reerred.
MONDAY, XOVEUREU It. 1918
OREGON WEATHER 4
Fair; killing frost in the
morning. Light easterly winds.
Qsfll jit
-f MAKEUP OP OCR NEXT ' ' "
UNITED STATES SENATE
.
According to the latest re-
turns, the makeup of the next
United States senate will be as
follows:
4 Republicans, 49.
Democrats, 47.
Necessary for majority, 49.
The present senate stands,
4 democrats 52, republicans 44.
mm
m a Km all II " .v.VV'L
Non-bitter,
Made Ilka jell.
Fruit out flnet spreads
like Jam.
Made from California
oranges, ripened on
hanoe its tiavor.
Order
HAVK
A J Alt
ON YOVlt
XKXT ORDER
ra J a.
Kinney &Truax
Grocery
s
WaslilitKton, Nov. 11. A dlsputoh
from' The IIhkuo stutus that William
UoUoniolU'rn arrived iu Holland, on
route to a castlo near I'trocht.
Amstcrdiim, Nov. 11. Crown
Prince Rupltrecht and staff have fled
from Ut'BO, at which place the gar
rison revolted, It Ig reported.
might be years before a good many.
of them got back.
tient.
We must be pa-
EIGHT HOI RS
One of our largest employers of
labor, Henry Ford, acting as an um
pire for the national war labor board
has come out flat for the eight-hour-
day principle.
He Is not for the eight-hour "ba
sic" day that Is, eight hours taken
as a mere basis for reckoning a day's
pay, though the working day Itself
may be longer. It is not good policy
he insists, to give what may seem a
fair day's wages for the first eight
hours and then keep the employe
working on top of that for "time-
and-a-half for over-time and double
time Sundays and holidays." Eight
hours Is enough, and the pay should
be based on the absolute fact.
"My experience, and also my rea
son," he explains, "teaches me that
err few emergencies ever exist in
manufacturing business justifying
the practice of exceeding eight work
ing hours per day. The strain of
eight hours Is enough and the hours
shonld never be increased except un
der the most extraordinary circum
stances. I cannot dwell too much on
this. For the good of the men, tor
the good of the employer and for the
general results, I would admonish
those interested to adhere to the
straight eight-hour day."
The public is Inclined to agree
with Mr. Ford.
for the trying period ' following
peace."
"Every hut In France," he said,
"will become a university class room
on the day "peace ts signed. The
boys will be given every educational
advantage under leading educators
nd business men from the United
States."
AMERICA GAINS EVERY POIHT
Continued from Page One.)
not be Affected by the armistice.
Draft boards wilt continue to class
ify registrants of September 12th.
Secretary Daniels announced that
there will be no immediate demob
ilization of any part of the naval
forces. !
Washington, Nov. 11. To-
4- day ts a nation-wide celebra- 4
4 tion and holiday. 4-
4 Salem. Ore.. Nov. 11. Gov- 4
4 ernor Wlthycombe has declared 4
4 this a legal holiday. 4
444444444444444 44-44
Amsterdam, Nov. 11. William
Hohenxollern, his el dust son, and von
Hlndenburg, are In a train near the
station of Eysten, awaiting the de
cision of the Dutch government. It
is reliably reported that the blinds
on the train are down. The emper
or was on his way to the British lines
to surrender when he was headed off
by the revolutionists and forced to
seek safety In Holland.
Amsterdam, Nov. 11. it Is stated
on good authority that William Ho-
hensollern will be interned In Hol
land. I
London, Nov. 11. General Foch
has notified the German commander
that the allied troops, until further
ordors, will not go beyond the line
reached at 11 o'clock today.
(Continued tram page 1.)
Copenhagen, Nov. 11. The Ger
man revolution Is an accomplished
fact. Fourteen of 26 states are re
ported to be securely in the bands of
the revolutionists.
MAY TAKE TWO HEARS
(Continued from page 1)
MARCHING HOME
No one should make the mistake
of expecting that the signing of an
armistice means the early return of
his soldier friends or relatives. Even
the final signing of a peace treaty
will not necessarily mean that.
The mere routine process of de
mobilization alone requires a long
time when such large numbers of
men are concerned. And It may be
a considerable time after the peace
declaration before the actual demob
ilization begins.
There will be an enormous amount
of work for the allied armies to do
after hostilities end. They will have
to clean np all the battlefields, re
moving the wreckage, burying the
dead, salvaging useful material, and
packing np all their stuff for remov
al. They will bare to dismantle or
otherwise dispose of hundreds of
miles of railroads, vast warehouses
and docks and all the miscellaneous
paraphernalia of modern warfare.
They may be required for some of
the reconstruction work in France,
Belgium and other devastated coun
tries.
Moreover,' It will toe necessary for
many months, and probably for
years, to police several of the bel
ligerent countries which are now un
dergoing revolution or whose govern
, ments are unstable. It will be ne
cessary 'to garrison all the enemy
countries until they have fulfilled
11 the peace terms Imposed on
them. Nobody knows how long that
will take. . : ' ' '''. ;
: It may be several months before
any f our -troope" Teach home. - It
Secretary Baker has given the
plain warning that it will be many
months before the last man is out of
khaki and back at a productive task.
The general staff plans are so ad
justed that there will be to sudden
glutting of the labor market with a
resultant "hard times" era.
alt-
Paris, Nov. 11. The German
uation Is as follows:
In Prussia the emperor has gone
and the socialist government In an
undetermined form la In power. In
Bavaria and Wurtemburg republics
have been proclaimed.
The royal family In Oldenburg has
fled and a revolution Is reported. ' A
republic has been formed at Scheles-
wig and Holsteln and many towns
are in the hands of the revolution-
lets. Kiel and other ports are in
the power of the revolutionist naval
units.
New York, Nov. 11. Demoblllza
tion of the American forces In
France will require two years after
peace is declared, according to a
statement made today by General T.
Coleman Dupont, juBt returned from
a two months' visit to the western
front.
Declaring his views were a reflec
tion of official opinion among allied
forces, he asked Americans to accus
tom themselves to long demobllia
tion as they had to long war.
"One of the generals asked me,"
he said, "to tell the people at home
that our boys have a year's work
ahead of them in removing the
barbed wire the Huns' have strung
across France."
Asserting that the Civil war had
"turned thousands of men back Into
civil life weakened and purpose
less," General Dupont said the seven
war work agencies should, be sup
ported generously In their approach
ing campaign. He declared that
"statesmanlike plans are being laid
OBITUARY
Jamea Brace Meikle
James Bruce Meikle was born
February 14, 1889, at Omaha, Neb.,
and died november 6, 1918, at Dor
rls, Cal. At 8 years of age his par
ents moved to' Seattle, where James
spent his boyhood days and received
bis training, graduating from that
city's high school. Afterwards he
atended college at Pomona, Cal
Mr. Meikle has held several respon
sible positions as an accountant of
ability. At the time of his death was
head mill-wright and foreman for
the Evans Creek Lumber company.
In the year 1911 he was united in
marriage to Miss Florence May Kes-
terson. To this union three chil
dren were born, one son who died In
infancy, Montea -May, and Florence
Virginia, with their mother survive
the untimely death of a kind and lov
ing father and husband.
Our classified ads brine results
Do You Need a New Tire?
GOODYEAR, RACTNE, GOODRICH, FEDERAL, FISK, PEXXSYL-
. VAXIA, WIRE-GRIP.
EVERY TIRE GUARANTEED
80x3 H from 910.65 to $320
C. L, HOBART CO.
W4
ATTENTION!
TRUCK, TRACTOR AM) At.
TOMOBILE OWNERS v
We have In our employ one of
the best acetylene welders on
the coast. All kinds of heavy
machinery and aluminum
crank cases welded. We weld
anything.
AU kinds of lathe work turned
oat.
. PRICES REASONABLE
Phoae loo
Crater Lake Miter Co.
mhdford, Oregon
(MTS
pi)
We will win this war
Nothing else really matter until we do I
Urn
Be patient here Oar Boy are getting
over there!
JOB PRISTING KEATIY DONE AT THE COURIER OFFICE'
Coal is $80 a ton in your
boy's village this winter
TDERHAPS he is billeted in a barn, or even a hen
coop. There is snow on the ground, and the mud
freezes hard to his boots. In all the village there is just
one place where he can dry and warm his hut
You are thinking about your own coal problem,
here at home. But what would you do if there was
only one place in town -where you could find a fire?.
That s your boy's fuel problem for the coming months.
Are you going to keep the hut fires burning?
UNITED WAR WORK CAMPAIGN
. Coasted , ROGl'H JOYKft JiAJI 1WAJV8. QOMPAJVY.
-i '"VI.
,4 j n'.fl.l

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