OCR Interpretation


Rogue River courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 19??-1918, November 19, 1918, DAILY EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Oregon Libraries; Eugene, OR

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96088180/1918-11-19/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE TWO

r AGS TWO
DAILY ROGOB aUYKB OOdUUI
Tt i:SI).V, NOVKMIIKH 1, 101.
Mill ROGUE M COURIER
Pobllsoea Dally Except Saturday
a. C VOORHIES. Pub. and Propr.
etatar4 at postofflcs. Oranta Pass,
Or aa second elaaa mall mattar.
ADVERTISING RATES
tHsplay apace, per Inch 16a
i Local-personal column, per Una 10c
Headers, par line Be
DAILY COURIER
By man or carrier, per year..$.00
By mall or carrier. ?-r month- .60
WEEKLY COPRIER
9f mall, per year
.11.60
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESo
The Associated Preaa la exclnarrely
titled to the use (or republication
af all news dleeatohea credited to K
er not otherwise credited 1b this
?aper and also the local news pub
lished herein.
All rights of republication ot spe-
elal dispatches herein are also
reserved.
TTESDAT, NOVEMBER 10, 1018.
OREGON WKATHEB
4 Rain In west portion; lair
-f In east portion; gentle easterly
4 winds. 4
4 4 4 4 4
CARING FOR OCR WOCNDED
The United States government Is
resolved to do its beet to restore
every wounded American soldier and
sailor to health, strength, and self
supporting activity.
Until his discharge from the hos
pital all the medical and surgical
treatment necessary to restore him
to health is under the Jurisdiction
of the military or naval authorities.
according to the branch ot the ser
vice he Is in. The vocational train
ing, the reeducation and rehabilia-
tion necessary to restore him to self
supporting activity, Is under the Jur
isdiction of the Federal Board for
Vocational Education.
If he needs an artificial limb or
mechanical appliance the govern
ment will supply It free, will keep it
in repair, and renew it when neces
sary. If after discharge he again
needs' medical treatment on account
of his disability the government will
supply It free. While he is In the
hospital and while in training after
wards the soldier or sailor will re
ceive compensation as if In service
and his family or dependents will
receive their allotment.
A wounded soldier or sailor, al
though his disability does not pre
vent him from returning to employ
ment without training, can take a
course of vocational, training free of
cost and the compensation provided
by the war-risk Insurance act will
be paid to him and the training will
be free, but no allotment will be
paid to his family.
Every Liberty bond holder who
holds his bond is keeping up a part
of this great work of restoring to
health, strength, and usefulness the
men who have suffered for their
country. , ' 1
Says Samuel Gompers, president
of the American Federation of la
bor: "The American working people
will not be forced back by all the
Bourbons In the United States."
Gompers was referring to the ques
tion Intimated by some, that after
the war Is over lower wages and
longer hours will be necessary. As
head of all organized labor in the
"United States, Gompers is a power
o be reckoned with.
. While many ot the returning sol
diers will want the chance to carve
a farm . out of Uncle Sam's domain,
It Is a safe bet that the majority of
them will prefer a good, man's sized
Job at reasonable wages. And It Is
s; duty of our government to see
V7
HOSIERY
IXR MEX. WOMEN" AXI) C1IIL
1HEX EVKUV PAIR Gl'AKAX
TEED, IT is LEFT TO VOl. IF WEAR IS
NOT SATISFACTORY RETURN TO
US FOR ANOTHER PAIR,
Kinney &Truax
that those boys who want their old
jobs back when tlrey lay aside their
shooting irons, get them.
As usual, Josephine county went
over the top in the drive for money.
Yesterday afternoon, before time
was up, George E. Lundburg an
nounced that the county had more
than raised Its quota in the United
War Work campaign.
Nothing is more disconcerting
than to "have the flu In your midst."
Have you seen the "movies" since
the "flu ban" was banished t
4444444444444444
4 U. 8. CASUALTY LIST 4
4444444444 44444444
The following casualties are re
ported by the commanding general
of the American expeditionary
forces for today:
Killed in action 217
Missing In action 40
Died of wounds 69
Died of accident . '. 2
Died of disease 401
Wounded severely 99
Wounded, degree undetermined 247
Wounded slightly 266
Prisoners . 48
Total 1.489
Killed In action Leslie A. Lev
ins, Elkton; Robert G. Little, Ore
gon City.
Died ot wounds Millard M.
Gates, HUIsboro.
Died of disease Charles W.
Cross, Union; Philip R. Trefren,
Butte Falls.
Wounded severely Marcus W.
Haines, Elkton.
The commander in chief of the
American Expeditionary Forces, in
the name of the president has award
ed the distinguished service cross to
Private, 1st Class, Gilbert W. Wil
cox, Company . D, 4th Engineers,
"For extraordinary heroism in ac
tion on the Vesle river, near Vllle
Savoy, France, August 11, 1918.
Private Wilcox volunteered to go In
to Vllle Savoy at a time when it
was under a heavy bombardment, to
rescue a wounded officer." Home
address: Mrs. Nathan Wilcox, moth
er, route 1, Box 193, Linton, Ore.
Y
IS A MIS SIZED 1
American Advance Zone, France,
Oct. 20 ( Correspond enc of the As
sociated Press). 'Bread for the
Yankee foldler in France is baked,
not in "ne dainty one-pound liavi
used at 'ion't, but in .oives thai
welg'.i 12 ji'b.'ds each. 1'iey are no
big is to b lnconvealeai and the
size njrf If tfing cbangsd to a uni
form square loaf of four pounds.
All the baking is on a huge scale.
Asked, for the recipe by which Am
erican bread has attained- its super
iority among all the allied armlet,
the chief baker gave it as follows:
Flour, 160 pounds; sugar, salt,
yeast, lard and water, 56 pounds; to
tal 216 pounds. He did not define
the amount of the various ingredi
ents, possibly from fear of giving
information to the bakers of the Ger
man army.
The huge quantities ot dought al
ways on hand "aging" or rising un
der the Influence of the yeast look
like a giant battery of snow balls.
Each dough Is' a huge mass weigh
ing 480 pounds which two men
handle with difficulty. Over it the
soldiers bend, naked to the waist,
kneedlng and mixing. Then the
huge mass rolls along to the next
table, where it Is drawn Into long
thick strings, which the soldiers'
deftly chop oft in 12-pound loaves,)
never varying an ounce, ready for
the ovens.
There la but one standard of army
bread, for officers and men alike,
and General Pershing eats, exactly
the same kind ot a 4-pound loaf as
the soldiers In the ranks. In fact, the
American army bread is so superior
to the civilian bread commonly on
sale in Franc, that Jt is regarded
as a great luxury, officers and men
are beselged by civilians to get them
some of the fine, white American
bread, and American officers at ho
tels are the envy of other guests for
the army bread they are able to eat.
It was suggested to the head ba
ker that tradition gave women the
first place as bread makers, and be
waa asked if women could not be
utilised in making this army bread,
thus relieving 2,000 men for service
on the fighting lines.
"Women couldn't last one day in
this kind of hard work," he said.
"This is bread making by the ton,
and by millions ot loaves, and It
takes physical strength to handle
the huge quantities of material. It
would be Impossible for women and
It Is the hardest kind ot work for
men."
NOTICE
I will be In Portland until Janu
ary 1st, for the Johns Manvllle Co.
My office will be handled by Miss
Galbraith, who is both competent
and reliable. Any courtesies ex
tended her will be appreciated by me.
L. A. LAUNER,
19 190 Church 8t., Portland, Ore,
NOTICE TO AUTOMOBILE OWNERS
We have taken over the Maxwell
Garage and would appreciate a part
of your trade. Drop in and let us
treat you as' you would like to be
treated.
G. W. TAVIS, and
18tf E. A. ADAMS.
SOLDIER LETTERS
lU-rt lreliy at the Front
France, Oct. 12.
Dvar Folks:
Iforo't a letter from your son, the
vet. We have had out baptism of
Nrt. beon through the big battle and
received a citation for gallantry
from Gen. lYralilnR. Had quite a
few hardships but we aro all right
now fcollng fine, back from the
front lines ratting up a bit. I can't
toll you much about the battle except
that It sure was all I ever dreamed
that h Is so long as Fritzles artil
lery lasts.
We had open fighting, and no
trenches to bother us, suited us fine.
The Germans were "sitting pretty"
behind their trenches with rabbit
pens, chicken yards, gardens and
tine dugouts. Can't tell snythlng
about the French people It will be
cut out. We don't go roaming
around over this country as some
people seem to think. We had fruit,
cakes, etc. from the German duiwiln
we took, fine turklsh clears nnd a lot
ot those kind of things.
I was too tired when we stopped
to got any souvenirs to carry back,
will get something lutcr. We were
there with U the trimmings you
read about tanks, heavies ano? our
"stove pipes" (3-Inch mortars). We
get our newspapers by airplane, they
drop oft bundles, makes It pretty
nice tor us. Can probably tell you
about what's left of a French village
after Frltzle gots through. His
heavies don't leave much of anything
In, a village but a pile of stone; this
is generally where Fritzle Is strong,
makes a great hit on ruining a vil
lage. Everything is quiet back here now
just distant drum fire. Met a man
from home yeaterday, Lamphere the
painter and paper hanger, he is In
the same regiment as I am.
It Is fine fall weather over here
sunny days and frost at night. We
have not picked up any cooties yet
as we have had no trench fighting.
I don't really want any either. I see
by the home papers that the "Y" Is
starting another big drive at home,
that's tine stuff.
Grace, I can tell you how we sleep
while In battle, just gt In behind a
hill and level off a place about 4 feet
wide then put down a slicker and
three or four ot us crawl In, pull up
another slicker and then some brush
on top and go to sleep. Wake up
when the big guns quit. Guess I
will quit now and go eat.
BERT.
BERT PRESLEY,
Hdq. Co. 363rd Inf.,
A. P. O. 776,
American Ex. Forces.
Do You Need a New Tire?
GOODYEAR, RACfrTE, GOODRICH. FEDERAL, FIBK, PENNSYL
VANIA, WIltE-GRIP.
: BVKRY TIRE GUARANTEED
S0x3K from 910.es to $32.80
C. L. HOB ART CO.
The Youths Companion
is worth more to
family life today
than ever before
THE COMPANION gtas the crate
amount of everything worth reading,
aa abundance of Fiction, of Entertain
ment, of Informing Reading, of Fact
and Humor, beeidea the Special Pages
for each on of every uMe. It appeals
to the families with highest ideals.
OFFER No. 1
New Subacribers to The Youth's
Companion will receive:
S2 WEEKLY ISSUES 119 ) An for
1919 Cempaaioe Hea
CaWarFra 1 U
,00
OFFER No. 2 '
THE TOUTS"! COMPANION 1 AD foe
KeCAU'S MACAZME $1.00 )
Check your choice and aend this coupon with your
remittance to the rUBllgtlEIS OF THIS tUtM,
or to The Yotrth'a Companion, Boaton, Maae.
SUBSCRIPTIONS RECEIVED AT THIS OFFICE
I Hla&6M0THEa fcgt I
1 5Jlw'irYV'7r
it nw
Vft
with
nqng
UncIeSam!
l5 In the
- New
The Perfect Tobacco for Pipe end Cigarette
Our Government needs tin for war purposes.
Thus the new "Tea-Foil" Package of Tuxedo
tobacco renders a timely and a double service: it
saves tin and has many advantages:
Soft and pliable.
Decreases in size as tobacco is used.
Tobacco does not cake in this package.
No digging it out with the finger.
Keeps the tobacco in perfect condition. .
Costs you less than tin.
10c a package.
Try Tuxedo in the new
Tea-1
Foil" Package today.
The Tobacco
? . Guaranteed by
1? . 1 o
Grants Pass & Crescent City Stage Co.
W. T. Hreun. I'ropr.
II. UlUiliiiM, Autui
Big Pierce Arrow Cars
Easy Riding
Office Old Obwrvor IIIIc. Corner Seventh and O treetsPhone B6
Teloplione JKMM nnd
JOB PRIIfllllG NEATH DONE JIT THE COURtER OfRCE
Mir a

xml | txt