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Rogue River courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 19??-1918, December 01, 1918, DAILY EDITION, Image 1

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DAILY EDITION
VOL. IX., No. ST.
GRANT PASS, JOSKPHJXB OOBiITT, ORBUOX, Hl-XDAV. DECEMBER 1, 1018.
Mil OLE NCMBEK 2528.
TWO FACTIONS WISH H TIE
FIGHTING FOR WG
FULL CONTROL
Will Resume Hostilities If Uriti.h
Prisoners Are Not Hotter Treated.
Germany Mitkrw Promisee
GERMAN SOCIAL1HT8 SEIZE AM
WIKKLKSH STATIONS TO SEND
Til Kill PROPAGANDA
GOVERKMENT MOT RESPONSIBLE
Food Conditions Not Critical,
Stated by Kolf Have Enough to
Iat I'nUI Next. April
Amitterdam, Nov. 30. In response
to a threat Iby the British armistice
commissioners that hostilities will
b resumed an lew conditions under
which prisoners arriving In the al
lied lines are remedlod, the Berlin
Telegraph declares that everything
Is being done by Germany to amure
an orderly return of prisoners, and
says the regular transport of roturn-
A Ing prisoners ts now assured.
Berlin, Nov. 80. A group of In
dependont socialist democrats, close
ly Identified with the Spartacua ele
ment of Dr. Liebknocht, has seised
control of all wireless stations In
Oermany and are now transmitting
propaganda and other news, accord'
log to the Berlin Tageblatt.
Chancellor Ebert and Herr flasse,
on behalf of the government war
press, declare that the government
will not assume any responsibility
for wireless Information that Is be
ing s-nt out of Oermany.
PRESIDENT ADDRESSES
CONGRESS TOMORROW
Washington, Nov. 30. Pres
ident Wilson will address the
new session of congress Monday
afternoon, Instead of following
the usual custom of delivering
bis address on the second day
of the session.
WILL 0 RETURN HO
Ell ILI0II TO BE
RAISED III; TAXES
Huge War Revenue Bill for 1010-
1920 Win FurnUh Material for,
Long Debate la Congress
Gen. Pershing: to Return 39th, 78th and 87th Divisions in
Their Entirety Casualties Almost 30,000 More
Than Previously Given, a Total of 262,723
U. g. CASUALTY LIST
The following casualties are re-
Zurlch, Nov. 30. Pood conditions ported by the commanding general
In Germany ero bv no means critical of tho American expeditionary
and urgent, as Foreign Minister Bolf forces for publication Saturday:
would load tho world to believe, ac- Killed In action sol
cording to Information received here. Wed of wounds 166
Germany has food enough to last Died of accident
until April, if the army reserve store Died of disease HO
Is placed at the people's disposal. Wounded aeverely 28
Washington.'.' Nor. 30. General
Pershing has designated 80,000 sol
diers for early convoy to tbe United
States. General March announced.
that the units will be made public
later. 1
The 39th, 78th and 87th divisions
are Included In tbelr entirety.
General March amended the casu
alty reports from General Pershing,
giving the official total to November
26, as 262,723, exclusive of prison
ers. Killed In action, 28,363.
Died of wounds, 12,101.
Died of disease, 16,034.
Dlod from other causes. 1,980.
Missing, 14,290.
Wounded, 189,955.
The war department expects to
bring back from 152.000 to 175,000
men In December. Threo hundred
thousand monthly will be brought
over when the order Is under full
speed.
To date, 46,378 men have been
mustered out of camps In this coun
try The schedule Is the United
States calls for releasing about 1,000
men per day.
Washington, Nov. 30. Boston.
New York, Newport News, Va., and
Charleston, S. C, are the ports the
war department now plana to use
for the return of the army from
overseas. Even with this wlde dis
tribution of tbe strain on port fa
cilities and transportation, however.
and with German ship now idle In
German harbors employed on the
task, estimates show that the last
of the army could not possibly reach
the United States in less than eight
months. .
conservative calculations upon
which preparations by the depart
ment probably will be hased, fix ten
months as the minimum.
Washington, Nov. 30. The .senate
finance committee today completed
revision of the war revenue bill, de
signed to raise $6,000,000,000 in
taxes in 1919 and about $4,000,000,
000 In 1920. The measure is virtu
ally written to meet changed condi
tions attending the end of the war,
and now goes to the printer and will
be reported to the senate next week.
probably on Thursday.
Senate debate. Senator Simmons
aid today, may begin the following
Saturday or Monday.
With republicans lined up solidly
opposition to Inclusion of 1920
tax rates In the hill, it was conceded
that discussion In . the senate will
delay the measure and many sen
ators expressed doubt that It can be
enacted before March 3, the date of
the ending of the 65th congress.
In
Since October euoh stores have not Wounded, degree undetermined
been touched.
74
Wounded slightly ...... 135
Missing in action ..... 811
PREDICT INFLUENZA
FOR NEXT TWO YEARS
Total 1.213
Oregon
Killed In action Robert Bracken,
Weston; Albert W. Tlndale, Port
land; Lester C. Reese (mechanic),
Newburg; Martin Hartlee, Grande
Ronde.
Died of wounds Fred Ehlen, Au
rora; Guy C. Weese, lAntone.
Missing In action James B. El-
fort, Portland.
The following casualties are re
ported by the commanding general
Chicago,' Nov. 30. Plans for com-
batting another Influenza epldvmlr
which Is expected to sweop the coun-
try in 1919 will be considered by
health authorities from all parts of
the United States, Canada and South
America at the 46th annual conven-
tion of the Amorlcan Public Health of the American expeditionary
Modntlnn -which onnns hero Decern- forces for publication Sunday
bor 9. Killed In action ..... - 717
Members of the assqclatlon ssy Died of wounds 289
that all the Influenza epidemics Died of accident 12
since 1729 have been recurrent for Died of disease 727
from two to three years after the Wounded severely 64
Initial AhthM. e Vnr ltil PAAfinn Wounded, degree undetermined 102
leading authorities feel convinced
that tho visitation of 1918 will be
ropoated In 1919 and probably In
1920. Also It Is pointed out that In
previous epidemics the second and
third outbreaks have been more vir
ulent and attended Iby a higher mor
tality rate than were the Initial man
Ifettatlona.
Wounded slightly .....
Missing In action
251
875
SEAT AT PEACE TABLE
San Francisco, Nov. 80. Demand
that women be given a place at the
poace tame is maae in a can iur o
woman's reconstruction conference
In Chicago December 1, recently re
ceived here from Miss Florence M.
King, president of the Women's As
sociation of Commerce.
"Suffrage, a seat at the peace
table, and food production are the
three big things to be discussed at
the coming conference," said Miss
KIns's message. "History shows
that all former wars have ended
with the gate left open for more
war. This, surely will be overcome
if womon who provide the men who
made the war have a say in the peace
negotiations."
CLEAN BILL OF HEALTH
AT GOAT I
P
San Francisco, Nov. 30. Not one
of the 4,000 men at the United States
naval training station at Terba Bue-
na (Goat Island ( contracted lnflu-
enza during the epidemic in Califor
nia. Quarantine was established
September 22 and lasted exactly two
months. Every person coming Into
the naval station -was isolated seven
days. Special sprays were used toy
the men dally. Anti-Influenza vac
cines were made by the naval phy
sicians on the Island.
200 SUBS OIT OF TOTAIj OF
8(10 ARB? 81'NIC BY ALLIES
New Rocelle, Nov. 80. Mrs. Beth
Fairbanks won an interlocutory de- Falls City.-
cree of divorce from Douglas Fair-
hanks. She was awarded the cus
tody of the son. Testimony referred
to an "unknown woman" correepon
dent.
Total ,.3,027
Oregon
Killed In action Sergeant George
F. McCarthy, Portland; Jasper B.
Knox, Salina; Harry C. Beeson (me
chanic), Enterprise; August W.
Idndqulst, Enterprise; Robert R.
Whltted. Allegheny; George H. Ottet
London, Nov. 30: It Is announced
that approximately 200 Oerman sub
marines were destroyed during the
war. The total nhmber of all types
built by tbe Germans hj estimated to
have been 360,:
GIRLS. IN NIGHTIES.
By
Died of wounds Harry Thomp
son, Rloniana; Jonn a. Maurer, cu-
gene.
Died of disease Lee Parish, Mer
rill; Gale Moore, Portland.
Wounded severely Elmer 1
Phelps, Gresham.
Wounded slightly Elton Hewitt,
Salem; Oustaf B. Nelson, Astoria;
La-wrenoe C. Smith, Baker,
Missing In action lieutenant T.
F. Bloomfiold. Gladstone; Mareello
Gaszola, (Hillsdale; Rocoo Galluccl,
Portland; Jacob A. Hollock, Merlin;
night Laurel F. Boyd, Wallowa; John J,
Albert Matson,
Escaping with only their
clothes by cutting the screen on the purnee, Newport;
sleeping porch, 13 girls, and the ma- uregon uuy.
of the glrU' dormitory of the
tron
Eugene Bible university; were forced
out In the frosty, air early Friday
morning, when the building was des
troyed by fire, says the Eugene
Guard. Nothing was saved except
the light wearing apparel that the
young ladles grabbed as they made
a hasty exit from the building.
The dormitory Is a 14 -room struc
ture, newly furnished throughout,
and -was located In City Outlook ad
dltlon In the southeastern part of
the city. The loss Is estimated at
albout 110,000. with only small In
urance on the building.
CHILE. ORDERS PART
OF ARMY MOBILIZED
Buenos ' Aires, Nov. 80.
Demonstrations at Antofagasta
have assumed such a serious
character that the Chilean gov-
ernment has sent the; cruiser
Captlan Prat to that port with
troops. ' According to reports -f
from Santiago, the First and
Second army divisions have
been ordered mobilised.
TENNESSEE WANT McADOO
TO ItCN FOR PRESIDENT
Morrison, Tenn., Nov. 30 "Thank
you, but X hope you will not see me
as president."
So replied William G. McAdoo to
admirers here today rwhen tbey ex
pressed.' the hope that he' would be
president of; the United. States when
he next visited MorVlstown.
The director-general and hla.party
spent two hours, inspecting, railroad
facilities
BDCHE ATTACHtB0r.18SFT0THElR DEAD
TO KILL EMEHY STRETCHER-BEARERS
With the iBritlsh-Amerlcan Armies
Nov. 1. (Correspondence of thev As
sociated Press) German . deviltry
seemed to know no bounds in the
last days of the fighting on the Brit
ish front after the HIndenburg line
had been shattered. They attached
grenades to the bodies of dead Huns
left behind 1n the German retreat, so
that when the (bodies were lifted the
grenades exploded, killing or wound
ing the bearers. -
Near the town of Le Cateau, a
number of Australian stretcher-bearers
were killed by these grenades in
attempting to remove some German
dead from the field In front of an
American machine gun position,
Thereafter no Australian would put
hand on a dead German. In some
eases the bodies were dragged to
their burial places by means of a
long Tope which allowed the stretcher-bearers
to keep out of range of
any exploding, hand grenades.
' The Americans, on the other hand
hit upon the plan of making the Ger
man prisoners bury their own dead.
In one Instance a 43oche prisoner
f
LASJDAT
DESPITE FORMER ASSURANCES
LOXDOX HEARS THAT KAISER
SIGNED OX FRIDAY . j
OWADHU
says mm
signed PAPER
T
London, Nov. 30. The war cor
respondent of the British wireless
service at headquarters In France
says that when the. German dele
gates came to see Marshal Foch with
regard to the armistice, the marshal.
as well as the British high command;
knew perfectly veil that a few days
more "the marshal put It at , 10
days at the most"1 -"would have seen
the surrender of the entire Gorman
army Into his hands and the culmin
ation of the greatest victory, of all
ages.
"The marshal," says the corres
pondent, "renounced that great vic
tory deliberately and with his eyes
open (because continuation of the
struggle must have- cost a certain
number of French and British lives
and he .could not have it on his con
science to sacrifice one life after it
was In his power to make peace on
terms of victory."'
A Copenhagen correspondent says
that at 6 o'clock., yesterday morning
two squadrons of British warships
passed the Skaw, Denmark, steaming
slowly southward. There were 22
ships, including destroyers, cruisers
mine sweepers and transports.
When the fleet passed through
Aalek toay, It met steamers with
British war- prisoners aboard on
their way from Copenhagen to Eng
land. Marines and. soldiers cheered
each other as the warships passed
the repatriating Teasels at a distance
of a few meters. -
Wilhelm Expresses Hope that New
"Regent' Win Be Able to Protect
Germany Against the Enemy
London, Nov. 30. Former Em
peror William signed his abdication
yesterday-at Amerongen, Holland,
according to a dispatch to the Wolff
Bureau of Berlin from Copenhagen.
The abdication decree i expressed
the hope that "the new regent"
would he able to protect the German
people against anarchy, starvation
and foreign supremacy.
The use of the word "regent" Is -
commented upon here as possibly
significant.
(The English have always assert
ed that there has never been any
proof that the kaiser abdicated his
throne, and the late news from the
Wolff Bureau at Berlin Is not offi
cial. Berlin "offlclaUy" announced
on November 9, two days before the1
armistice -was signed, that the kaiser
had abdicated, and on the same date
Prince Maxlmtlllan announced that
the kaiser and the crown prince had
renounced their thrones. ' It Is be
lieved that the English do not pat
any more faith In this latter state
ment than In the assertions made on
November 9.) . .
THE PEACE DELEGATES
Washington, Nov. 30. Pres-
ldent Wilson, Secretary Lan-
sing, former Ambassador Henry
White, Colonel House and Gen- -f .
eral Bliss will be the American ,
representatives at the peace
conference. . '
CALIFORNIA GIVES 137,083.
TO THE V. Si SERVICE
was summarily shot because he re
fused to remove the body of one of
his dead companions. An examina
tion of the body later led to the dis
covery that it was rained. The Ger
man was aware of this fact and re
fused to touch It.
In one small town evacuated by
the Germans, many of the beds were
found to be mined. An American
officer, tired and worn by a long and
hard fighting, sought rest on
lounge In a room .previously occupied
by a 'German officer. The rounge
hlew up and he was Instantly killed:
Another officer picked up a pair
of field glasses left by the Germans
and was adjusting the focus-, when
the glasses exploded In his hand and
blew away a part of his face.
The Huns had become adept In
the nefarious .business of making in
fernal machines, mines and time
fuses, and there was scarcely an area
where the electrical and engineering
experts of. the allies did not find
some new form of thetr fiendish In
Sacramento, Nov.- SO. California
furnished the nation- a total of 137,'
033 men- lor service in. the- army.
navy and marine corps, (between the
time the national' guard of the state
was ordered mobilized, March 26,
1917, and the signing of the armis
tice, according-to-figures made pub
lic today by Adjutant General J. J.
Borree.
JAPS CHOOSE DELEGATE
FOR PEACE CONFERENCE
Washington,. Nov. SO. An official
dispatch from Japan announces that
Marquis KinmochI Salonjl, former
premier,, has been re-designated to
head the Japanese delegation to the
peace conference. Viscount Kato,
first reported as replacing Salonjl,
will not be a member of the party.
ALL BREWING IX V. 8.
4- WILL STOP TONIGHT
'.
-f Washington, Nov. 80. The
f brewing of beer and other malt
tbererages stops at midnight to-
V night throughout the entire -f
country.
f -f
OF
E FEET
Phoenlxv Ariz Nor. 80. The
drilling, of the first of wells that tap
an underground reservoir of . 200,000
acre feet of water, which, hydrolo
gists say, lies under the Salt River
valley, has been started' by the Salt
River Valley- Waters-. Users associa
tion. Three, well rigs have been set
up In the . vicinity of Mesa and the .
other two are to be started soon.
The Salt River valley farmers
voted last August to spend $500,000
for the construction of from 40 to
60-pumping plants to. develop water
to be; used. as. an. auxiliary to the
supply from the Roosevelt reservoir.
The wells are expected to serve a
double purpose, supplying water for'
irrigation and serving as a drainage
system to carry off the underground .
flow that has threatened to submerge .
parts of the rich valley land.
SOON FINISH DUTIES
' New York, Nov.- 29. The sugar
divisions of the' food administration
throughout the country will begin
demobilizing about December 15, In,
anticipation of the arrival of Cuba's
sugar crop In January. Restrictions
will be modified next week.'
genuity.

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