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Rogue River courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 19??-1918, December 15, 1918, DAILY EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96088180/1918-12-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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DAILY EDITION
VOL. IX, No. 4)0
GRANTS PAHS, JOBKI'IIINB COUNTY, OREGON, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1918. '
WHOLE Xl'MBER 2540
fit
DEMOCRATIC
FUTURE FOR
Alt GERMANY
SELECTED A LOSER
WanlMl Complete HoiaraUon From
lOtigliind and Arc Accused of
Plotting Willi Germany
IMV.UUAN I'ltKMIhit HKKMH TO
UK BADLY Ol'T OK VliAVK
IN ROYAL PALACE
LEADER IS CALLED AN IDEALIST
Ibxwlved Cormipomli-iit Whllo Bcl-
ed on Omch With Wife, Wlw
InlrJirlN HuggrMlona
Munich, Doc. 14. "If democracy
pre da to all classes, at I believe
probable, Germany will become the
mom democratic country In the
'world," aald Kurt Eisner, the llav
arlan Premier, In concluding an In
formal call the correspondent made
today, a he hoard hi wlfo's Insist
ont voice outMlde tho door, remind
Ing him that It waa time to go to l"n
theater.
The llavarlan loader la an Ideal
Int. His opponents any Eisner him
tHilf probably, jvould bo the only per
eoa In tho -world to deny the allega
tlon. Ilia friend, call blm "the
greatest man In Germany," but hli
enemies, who are apparently Increas
ing In navnrla, declare that he It
"an Unpractical and dreaming Ideal
1st."
The aorlalliit loader appear al
moat Incongruous In hla office amid
the surroundings of the former royal
regime. Eisner Is ihort and Block y,
The fore part or hla hoad la almost
(bald, but a ahook of Iron-gray hair
hangs far "below hla collar. Ho ha
huge red whiskers, allnhtly shot
with gray. Ho dresses simply.
Mra. Rlsner la the constant com
panlon ot hnr husband. She la very
ftronll In stature, and locks tiny be
Ido him. She norma In atrann
surrounding, aa, In a plain gown
tthe flits about tho hugo building
with pulnttnga of former kings nnd
diplomats In gorgeous uniforms star
Ing from the high walla.
I'remler Klancr received the cor
respondent the first time whllo he
lounged ungraeefiitly on a com
'which ttroancd under hla weight. His
wife ant alongside and Interjected
suggestions horo nnd there.
ENGLISH FLEET NOISY
s
London, Nov. 30 (Correspond
cnee of Associated Press) A vast
chorua of air en whistles from a thou
and fighting ships spilt the air
when tho HrltlHh Orand Fleet recelV'
cd the news of the signing ot th
armUtlce. First the thirty-mile lin
of vesalus sprang Into light.- Thon
suddenly, the great fleet ot battlo
tmlpa, cruisers, torpedo destroyers
mine-layers and patrols united in one
tinge, synchronized dlapson that
startled the hearers for a radius ot
hundred miles. The tremendous
sound .re-ochocd amongst the 'hills on
both shores, awesome In Its inten
elty.
A hundred soarchltghts, which tor
four years had resolutely watched
the Bkles, or peered steadfastly along
dark waters for enomy craft, merrily
criss-crossed about tho sky. Flares
were lit, star shells fired, and here
nd there some of the 'greater ships
were fortunate In a fireworks dlS'
Play.
For sixty minutes the Fleet threw
oft all reserve and let Itself go. At
nine o'clock the sirens suddenly si
lenced, the lights snapped out nnd
the Orand Fleet was again -waiting
nd watching and ready, and scarce
ly had the last sounds died away
than from the Admiral's ships there
wore winking at the masthead the
orders for further duty.
HE Si
PRESIDENTIAL PARTY NOW
HAILED BY DENSE THRONG
Dublin, Due. 14. The collapse of
Germany Is expected In somo quar
ters In Ireland to exert a strong In
fluence on the election of members
of parliament which takes place to
morrow. Aa John Dillon, the Irish
Nationalist leadvr put It, the German
collapao showed the Sinn Felners
that they "backed the wrong horse."
The Sinn Felners contested the
nationalist seats In' parliament on a
program of com plots separation from
ivngiana. Tneir candidates were
pledged to refuse to attend the Brit
Inn parliament If elected. For the
most part the Sinn Fein candidates
are at present In English prisons held
on a charge of being concerned tn a
German plot.
The Nationalist party In moat In
stances fought for their seats but
few, notably flwlft and MacNell
retired from the contests with the
remarks that Ireland was thankless
toward her politicians.
The Nationalist program for Ire
land remains constitutional action In
parliament but they added to this
promise to lay their case for self-
dotcrmlnatlon before President Wil
son. They also promised to try to
secure the future position of Ire
land In the world-rearrangement ex
pected to follow the peace conference
at Versailles. This attitude encour
aged some to hope for cooperation
between the Sinn Folners and the
Natlonallata; but It haa been pointed
out that their differences In princi
ple are fundamental.
Whichever form the Irish demands
eventually take the problem of Ul
ster, which has boon praotlcally the
sole obstacle to an Irish settlement
will still romsln. Even If the pesce
conference ever dealt with the Irish
question this obstacle would have
to be faced. There Is a home-rule
act now on the statute hook. It was
postponed till the end of the war
subject to en arrangement with Ul-
Hihr. So arrangement has been
made, noth the Sinn Felners and
the Nationalists are now agreed that
no arrangement shall be made and
nun i re inn ci muse ne treated as a
unit.
Tho unionists as a party expected
to profit by the conflict between the
Nationalist sections and had candi
dates In constituencies In which thev
would tinder narmal conditions -have
no chance. Some of the Unionists
prophesied that their party would
make a clean swe ep of the National
ists and that Ireland would he repre
sented at Westminster by S5 or more
Unionists and the rest of the mem
bers, Sinn Felners, remaining away.
U.S. Executive Lands in Paris at 10 A. M. Dines with
French Officials and makes Speech
of Cordial Welcome
On Board the George Washington,
Dec. 12, In final conferences be
fore leaving the ship today, the
provident made clear his position on
vital questions affecting the peace
conference in order that his Ideas
should be well defined before meet
ing with the entente premiers.
A remarkable farewell demonstra
tion for the president was held on
the ship last evening. At the con
clusion of the showing ot motion
pictures, a chorus of bluejackets en
tered the main salon and sang "God
Be With You Until We Meet Again."
The president apparently was
deeply affected as the sailors sang
the verses of the song, their melod
ious voices ringing through the ship.
As the solemn notes of the famous
old song were concluded, the orches-
ALLIES ATTEMPT TO
PREVENT CRUELTIES
Washington, Dec. 14. A state
ment by the national council ot
Seagrec, as the provisional govern
ment ot the Jugo-Slav territory. Bays
the allies, especially the United
States, have taken Immediate stops
to prevent bloodshed by the Italian
army of occupation and the Jugo
slav population ot Dalmatla, Flume
and Zadar. The statement claims
the Italians have violated the arm
stlce provisions In several manners.
ALLIES TO INVESTIGATE
OF
washlnton, Dec. 14. Amorlca and
the allies have agreed to send
mission to Poland to investigate al
legod atrocities.
AT COBLENZ BRIDGEHEAD
Washington, Dec. 14. General
Porhlng today announced that the
United States army ot occupation
had crossed the Rhine and occupied
Cobleni bridgehead.
GRANTS PASS MAN MUM-
ItKH NEW ORGANIZATION 4
Portland, Ore., Dec. 14.
Charles Hall, of Marshflold,
has been elected president ot
the new Oregon Chamber., of
Commerce Vice presidents
are, J. N. Burgos, Pendloton;
F. S. Dram well, Grants Pass;
Emery Olmstead, Portland.
tra struck up "Auld Lang Syne,"
which the ship's company Joined.
in
nORE TROOPS FOR BOLSHEVIK
EMM AND GERMANS
mm
Fifty-First Coast Artillery U Largest
Unit Mentioned for Immediate
Demobilization
wasnington, Dec. l. General lIxe EXTENDING FROM GULP
Pershing has designated 6,000 morel ftP m, lvn
Brest, Dec. 14. President Wilson
landed in France at S:24 o'clock
Friday afternoon amid a demonstra
tion of popular and national sympa
thy such as rarely. It ever, has been
accorded the head of a forelga gov
ernment visiting France. The pres
ident left Brest at 4 o'clock for Fur
ls, where the heart ot France will
acclaim him tomorrow at the na
tion's guest.
The landingof the president was
not only a remarkable spectacle.
with a notable naval pageant for its
background, but also marked the
first entry of an American president
Into personal contact with Kur.ipo
and Its affairs.
men for early return, the largest
unit being the 51st Coast Artillery.
General March announces demob
ilization In the United States now
proceeding at the rate of 15.003
daily. It U expected that the rate
will reach 30,000 daily soon.
TO DSIPER
RIVER, 400 MILES
DESTROY EVEHYTHI8G IS PATH
Advance Reported to Have Begun
November 11 Genua Sol
diers Joining the Rank
Washington, D. C, Dec. 14.-
Summarlzlng the record of the 91st
division, Paclflo coast. General Foch I
said It Joined the British la Flanders I
early In October, and on November I
1 advanced six kilometers on the Paris, Dec. 14. (Berne dispatches
Scheldt line against intense rifle say that the Bolshevlkl troops are
and machine gun fire; did patrol marching toward Central Europe on
duty on November 3d and 4th; was I a 400-mlIe front, from the Gulf of
withdrawn to rest billets on the Finland to the Dnlper river. The
6th. I advance began November 11, Ger-
General If arch said 140,000 men I man soldiers Joining the Bolshevlkl.
of the various division have now They were destroying everything la
been designated by General Persh-I their pan and capturing much ma-
mg ror return. Thirty-two thousand I teriaL
actually have sailed.
IS
EXTENDED TILL 1.17
Copenhagen, Dec. 14. The Ger
man armistice has been extended un
til 5 o'clock on the morning ot Jan
uary 17, according to a Treves dis
patch.
Copenhagen, Dec. J. 4 In extenJ
Ing the armistice the allies naified
Germany that they reserved tht right
to occupy the neutral zone cast ot
the Rhine from the Cologne bridge
head to the Dutch frontier, A Treve3
dispatch says.
Coblenz. by Courier
Tuesday, Dec. 10. A bottle thrown many Inquires.
from a window by a woman at an
American soldier has teen the only
overt act ot hostility reported since
the Americans have entered Coblenz.
The incident was regarded as being
so trivial that-R Iras left to the local
police to deal with the woman. There
has developed, however, within the
past 24 hours, an unmistakable air
of Independence on the part of the uopennagen,
people, reflecting their
that the Americans
BARRETT PAYS GLOWING TRIBUTE TO1
U. S. MARINES-LOSSES WERE HEAVY
Washington, Dec. 14. The first
complete list of nlarlno rnlts serv
ing with the Amerlcc:i army In
France was made public today by
Major General Barnett, commandant
ot the marine corps, in his annual
report to the secretary ot the navy.
With the list ot organization num
bers. General Barnett gives some
ot the congratulatory messages from
French and American officers pur
suing the great work of the marines
and commenting warmly upon the
magnificent courage and morale ot
the men among whom the casualty
rate was tremendous. .
Following are the marine units in
France: The 5th, 6th and 13th
regiments, the 1st machine gun bat
talion, the 1st, 2nd and 3rd replace
ment battalions, the 3rd, 4th, 5th
and Cth separate battalions, 1st nnd
2nd casual replacement battalions,
1st separate machine gun battalion
and part ot the 11th regiment. The
total up to date ot the report was
540 officers and 21,323 men.
Between April 1 and September 1,
1918, the marine casualties totalled
23 per cent ot their gross strength
Forty-four officers and 1,116 en
listed men were killed in action and
76 officers and 2,832 men were
wounded. .
"Only 25 men are known to be In I
the hands ot the enemy," General!
Barnett said. "It Is considered that
this constitutes a most remarkable
testimonial to the magnificent mor
ale and Individual courage of the
men." -
Attention Is also called to the re
markable records made by fresh
troops who -were thrown Into action
against veteran enemy forces after
only seven weeks ot training. ' Their
steadiness under fire, the report said
"Is eloquent ot the tine material
from which the corps Is drawing Its
men."
The marine corps also organized
a regiment of heavy artillery to man
7-Inch naval guns, provided with the
caterpillar tractors and mounts, and
built up its own aviation servloe, 80
student filers being graduated each
month, In the closing days of the
war, from the school at Boston.
Despite the great expansion ot the
corps and the reduced training per
iod, the marines maintained their
record for marksmanship, 67 per
cent ot the entire organization qua!
ifylng as marksmen, sharpshooters
and expert riflemen.
General Barnett recommended
that the permanent peace strength
ot the corps be raised to 31,500.
New construction recommended by
the commandant Includes facilities
at Philadelphia to cost 1450,000, ad
dltional mess halls and quarters at
Paris Island, 3. C, to cost $1,648
300, adequate water rorka at Quan
tlco, Va., and 'barracks at the New
York navy yard.
Quantlco should be the east coast
base and San Diego the west coast
base ot the corps, General.. Barnett
says, should It become necessary to
concentrate these troops at their
own depots In order to devote the
space they now occupy to Industrial
I activities of the navy yards.
POLICE JOIN STRIKE;
CI TV IS TERRORIZED
HUNS JOSTLE YANKS.
WONT TSE RED CROSS
FINDS IN GERMANY
Washington, Dec. 14. The Ameri
can Red Cross will nse no Dart ot
Its -war relief fund for the benefit
of the people of the central powers.
That announcement was made today
by George E. Scott, general manager
to Nancy. I of the organization, in response to
Dec. 14. General
conviction Foch announced today in behalf ot
are going to Herbert Hoover, that two and a halt
deal with them much more delicately mHion tons cargo space now lying
than have the French or British with ,n German harbors must be placed
the people north and south of the under control ot the allies to supply
city.
Instead ot cringing or even saow-
lng deep respect the population ad
opted an atitude today that found
expression in Jostling American sol
dlers on the street and In sneers and
laughs which were only vaguely con'
cealed.
Germany 'with foodstuffs.
TO
A
T
Washington, Dec. 14. Captain
Lester, of the U. S. secret service,
testified in the brewery Investigation
that German Lutheran 'pastors were
instructed to preach pro-German
sermons 'before the United States en
tered the war. Soma nastont whn
Christiana, Dec. 14.-HNorwegianJ,olned the .rmv later anfl continue
leaaers in science, poiiucs ana nus- BUC- DreachInlt are now ln tha At
lnsss,. have formed a society for the IanU penitentiary. Other Lutheran
purpose oi enrolling isorway in me m,n8ter8 were wholly loyal.
league ui uaiiuua ouni upon a uein-
ocratlo base, Prof. F. Nansen, the
famous Arctic explorer and scientist,
has been elected president of the so
ciety. In his Introductory address,
Prof. Nansen says:
"The dream of a fraternity ot na
tions has suddenly come within
sight. It is the goal ot which one
ot the world's greatest statesmen.
President Woodrow Wilson, is aim'
ing. . The reason why America is
WILSON MAKFS IDFAS
CLEAR ON QUESTIONS
Paris, Dec. H. President Wilson
and party arrived ln Paris at 10:15
thta morn 1 Tver . TianA thinn feaflA
now aMe to make this Utopian dream Lhe preaidellt. Rnd he WBg greeted
with yolleya and cheering. The roar
nf Wt1 AATY1 A .fWim frTia float laff mrk
"i -I.,", y :? , IT IU " oubt of the cordiality ot France'.
end,"
of
Montreal, Dec. 14. Montreal waa
quiet today after a night of disorder
growing out of the strlck ot --00
city employee for higher pay.
With all policemen and fireman
Joining the strikers, the olty. was
helpless 'for a time last night from
the depredations ot gangs of hood
lums, who looted stores, Invaded the
atres, robbed citizens and assaulted
volunteer firemen and private detec
tives.
BY NEW PRESIDENT
welcome to the chief executive
the United States.
President Wilson was greeted by
President and Madam Polncalre,
Clemenceau and other officials and
afterward President and Mrs. Wilson
were driven t6 the residence of
Prince Murat where they reside dur
ing their stay In Paris. French troops
lined the entiVe length of the route.
At a luncheon given by President
Amsterdam. Dec. 14. Konstantln Polncalre, President Wilson made a
Fehrenbach, president of the relch- speech in which he said: "It is Terr
stag, haa convoked a meeting of the delightful to tlnd myself In France
reichstag, according 'to Berlin re- and feel the quick contact of sympa-
Ports. thy and unaffected frlendshln be
t-ween representatives of the United
Chicago, Deo. 14. Football has States and FraneeV He talked ot
claimed nine Uvea this season, three the war and Ideals of the . United
less than last year and nine lees than States, and drank a health to his
ln 1916. I hosts and the -nronnerttT at Fnnn.
0

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