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Rogue River courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 19??-1918, December 29, 1918, DAILY EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96088180/1918-12-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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u,vr.U,oJOre.U"r.ry
X,
DAILY EDITION
VOL. IX., No. HO.
O RANTS PASS, JOSEPHINE) COCKTY, OREGON, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1018.
WHOLE NUMBER 2831.
mmsmm
Li
0 GEORGE
HOLDS A LEAD
E
U KXI'KXTKO T) HAVK OVER.
WHELMING MAJORITY IN TUB
HOl'BH OK XMMON8
SINN FEK ELECT ONLY 26
AwiiUth, Konuor Ijnwlrr of the l.H
crnl Party, r'fUI Hull ITom
Fife, Scotland
London, Ioc. 28. All Indications
re that Premier Lloyd George and
hi government will have an over
whelming majority In the new house
of commoni.
Lloyd GeoTgo was re-elected to
hi aent In parliament from Wale.
Herbert Asqulth, former premier and
leader of the Liberal party, haa been
defeated for hi seat In the house
of commoni from Fife, Scotland.
Kettirna thna far how the coali
tion ITnlonlat elected 127, the coall
tlon Liberal 56, Unionists five Lib
eral two, Ibor 23, Irish National
1st one, Sinn Fein 26, and tho In
dependent! one.
London, Ic. 28. router will
appear In every parish In lrolund to
day, announcing that the Irish re
public haa come Into being, ay the
Express. The central Sinn Fein
eounrll haa been re-established In
Dublin and call ltaolf the Irish par
liament. . . . '
London, Doc. 28. It 1 probable
that the Lnhorltea will be tho second
tronKOHl imrty In the houae of
commoni, aa the Sinn Polnners will
refrain from atUMidunco,. but the a-
borltea lost two of their strongest
leaders In Arthur Ilemlereon and
Philip Snowden, who were defeated.
Tho rosultB thus far are: Coall
tlonists, 396; non-Coiillllon, 144.
FAMOUS U. 8. ATHLETE
IS KILLED IN AtVIIKNT
Paris. Dec. 28. A 2.000-foot fall
killed Captain II obey linker, famous
A merit un flyer. It waa learned here
today. Me fell at the Tours aero
drome, whero ho was waltlug to
proceed home.
Hobcy linker wus ono of tho most
renownnd athletes ever developed In
the United Slates,
Wll HOLD IB IS
UoUo, Idaho, Due. 28. It Is tho
general opinion among employers
tli it t. women who havo buon taking
tho plures of men In tduho during!
tbe war will rotatn these positions.
William T. Wallace, managor of the;
Idulio Power company In an Inter
view on this subject says that he
feels women can till many positions
bettor than men, in his company, and
Jho has proved his contentions dur
ing the war. He docs not think
many women will loso their positions
particularly If they were Indoor
ones.
Women proved so sucessful , In
the box factory in tho noise 'Payette
company, that they will bo rotalned.
Women have occupied innny . posi
tions In tho maclilno shops ot the
Oregon Short Line, and a large num
ber will he retained. Women were
also employed In the canneries, those
will be retained. Having few fac
tories, most ot tho women of Idaho
tiave been employed as elevatdr op
orators, clerks ana some few as
printers. In many Instances they
'have been said to hare given equal
satisfaction with men. In but one
ease on record 'have they received
equat pay witn men, that is in a
"Boise print shop.
IK THE HONS
SOUNDS
WARNING
TO
Cardinal Gibbon Hay Ho Doe Not
t'var lbur Situation Nor Spread
ing of Doctrine
Cardinal Gibbon, of Baltimore, In
statement on Chrlitma eve, ex-
prened hi view with regard to the
Immediate future of America In the
following word:
'Tear a to the labor situation,
foara about tho spread of socialism
and kindred doctrine do not trouble
me. The only apprehension I might
bave wVmld be with regard to the
consolidation of control of the great
ptibllo Interest of the country In
the authorities of the government
Itself. Those Interests are vast and
wide reaching and control the well-
being of million of men, such Inter
eat a the railroads and the tele
graph a well a other. I should
be sorry to see these things put un
der the direction of any federal ad
ministration. The men employed In
these Industrie and utilities would
form the preponderating interest In
any administration and would tend
to porpetuatlon of power. I believe
In a division of power and think It
best for the country."
SHIPPlNGaOCOMOTIVES
New York, Deo. 28 Tbe shipment
of American built steam locomotives
weighing 73 ton each and aasebled
all but the smoke stack and tho ten
dor so that they could move away
under their own steam within a few
hours after their arrival In France
was among the accomplishments ot
the United States army transport
force under stress ot wur and haa
since boon continued.
Moro than four hundred ot these
loi-omotlvos were so shipped from
New York In a few mouths, it was
learned here with the lifting ot the
war censorship regulations, and
these we ro In addition to 1,200 which
were shipped In suctions nine' to a
locomotive packed In cases. The
ships used to transport tbo locomo
tives, complete, were of a special
type with three holds, each hold
moasuring CO by 102 foot entered
by hutches 3D feot wldo and 4 2
feet long.
Into ouch of the three holds was
placed 12 locomotives 36 to a ship.
I-or u bod or flooring on which they
rested fiir the voyage, was . used
moro thun 3,000 tons ot steel mils.
Tho locomotives when In position
were braced with heavy wooden
beams and the apace between the
boilers to the lovol of the top ot the
steam dome packed solid with high
ly compressed baled hay.
On this hay another flooring was
laid, and on this floor was placed
the lenders the smoko stuck, with
moro baled hny or other light cargo,
packed In tno space where coal is to
be carried. On top qf the tenders
was packed still more cargo to the
dock level, and during the "rush
days" the above dock space tilled
with crated airplanes. When com
pletely loaded with tho 36 locomo
tives and other cargo, each vessel
was carrying a dead weight of 14,
000 tons In addition to ship ma
chinery, bunker coal and crew sup
plies. -
OLD INDIAN FIGHTER
IS
Ashland, Ore., Dec. 28. Captain
Ivan D. Applegate, ootogenarlan who
served in the Indian wars and one
of the first Indian agents of Klanv
ath county, was probably fatally
burned today. His ntghtrobe caught
fire while standing In front of his
fireplace at his home early this
morning.
POWERS
VILHA MAY FAL
I
F
BOLSHEVIKS
POLISH CHIEF OP STAFF SHOWS
FIG HTI NO FltONT DEM AX IM4
PASSAGE FOR TltOOI'M
POLES ASK ALLIES FOB HELP
lloljthoviki Murdering Thoae Who
OpMHM Them Lenlne Raining an
Army of 3,000,000
London, Dee. 28. Vllna, the capi
tal ot Lithuania, Is threatened by an
advance ot. Bolshevist troops, ac
cording to Warsaw dispatch.
The Polish chief of staff has de
manded a free passage for his troop
trains over the lines now In German
hands, from the Polish frontier to
Vllna.
II the reply I unfavorable, the
Poles will begin to march Into LI
thuanla. The Poles have asked the
allies to send officer to accompany
the troops.
Russia Is striving desperately to
form some sort of a stable govern
ment, but progress is slow, with the
Bolshevlkl murdering all who op
pose them. The situation has set
tied down to almost a civil war, and
the latest reports would Indicate
that some decisive battles may soon
bo fought. Lenlne has announced
hit Intention ot raising an army of
3,000.000 soldiers by spring. Many
or the returning soldiers are said
to Ira Joining the ranks of his army,
through fear.
l.IOO.OOO YANK TROOPS
NAMED FOR DEMOBILIZATION
Washington, Dec. 28, Over
1.100,000 American soldiers at home
and abroad have been designated tor
demobilization since the armistice
waa signed, General March announced.
MO HANDS 0
ARMED BOLSHEVIKS WHIP THE PEOPLE
IN LINE AGITATORS HUH M YORK
tandon, Dec, 28. The Bolshovik
government In Russia is described
by a man who recently returned from
that couutry as "a carpetbag govern
ment of tho most flagrant sort."
Theoretically, ho says, the Bolshevik
government Is popular and supposed
to represent the will of the working
masses throughout Russia. In prac
tice local SovlotB have been bowled
over whenever they failed to satisfy
Moscow officials, and outsiders have
been placed In control. A large pro
portion .of the traveling commissars
who go about Russia on armored
trains to keep tho local Soviets In
line are declared to be agitators!
from New York and London.
Tho government Is described as
analogous to such a rule as might be
Imagined to originate with work -
men ot New York and Chicago.
Carrying out the analogy, .such a
government would recognize the po
litical rights of nobody but work
men In New Orleans and San Fran
cisco. , It would overthrow by arms
any government In Seattle or San
Antonio which did not reflect Its own
views and would deny the ballot to
all persons possessed of property.
XTnder such a government New York
and Chicago politicians would be
sent with armed trains to overthrow
Soviets In St. lanis and Detroit
whloh failed to obey the mandate
of. the .central governing board.. Da
kota ywheat farmers and Texas cot
ton growers would be forced to sur
render their products to armed cru
ders at -whatever price the central
Soviet officials chose to pay. Sank
i
GEN. MING KAISER AND HlflDY
W HB SJ BBBBBBJ Bf W BJ MBJ
LAYS DOWN NEW
. ...
IE FOR UN
HERETOFORE GIVEN A FREE
REIGN, GERMAN'S GET TASTE
OP OWN MEDICINE
TO CHECK JIBUSE OF PRIVILEGE
Uoclie Mum Carry Identification
Card and Give I'p All Weapon
and Ammunition
Coblenz, Dee. 28. Rule tor the
guidance ot tbe inhabitant of the
regions now occupied by the Ameri
can troops have been Issued by Gen
eral Pershing. Hitherto General
Pershing has not interfered in local
affairs.
The Germans bad come to believe
that such conditions would continue,
and while there has been no serious
incident, General Pershing believed
it best to check, any tendency to
ward abuse.
Each inhabitant mast carry his
Identification card and give notice
ot changing his habitation. Weapons
and ammunition must be surrender
ed. Crowds are forbidden, and a mil
Itary court will deal with anyone at
tacking or Impeding the soldiers.
SENATOR JONES TAKES
TRIP IN AN AIRPLANE
Washington, Dec. 28. Senator
Jones of Washington, started to New
York today In an army airplane,
piloted by Lieutenant Logg.
Minneola, New York, Dec 28.
Senator Jone has completed his
trip. He will fly back to Washing
ton Monday,
Honolulu, Dec. 28. A Toklo cable
to the Nippu J1J1 here says that the
Japanese war department has a
nounced that half ot the Japanese
troops in Siberia will be withdrawn
soon.
and Industries of all sorts would be
nationalized. Titles to farm land
and city property would vest In the
government.
Workmen, the travelor. Bays, com
pose less than 10 per cent ot the
population of Russia. Consequently,
tho assumption ot spokesmen ot rad
ical labor circles to sociallzo Russia
was more chimerical than it would
be in a highly Industrialized country.
Russia Is an unorganized primitive
agricultural country; 90 per cent of
Its peasants possess property which
falls within the confiscation lines
us defined by Lenlne. Siberia and
other undeveloped farming sections
of R' sslan domain offer exceptional
opportunities to Industrious settlers'
'and there every man stands or falls
according to his own industry and
merit. Such districts, It Is stated,
feel no need for efforts at socializa
tion and were the first to resent the
domination of representatives ot the
Lenlne government. ' !
Insults offered by the traveling
commissars and tholr armed bands
have aroused the antagonism of
Christian organizations, Including
the Russian orthodox church. It is
asserted that few ot .the agitators
from America are American cltltens.
Almost without exception they .are
said to be anxious to return to the
United States. They .are dissatis
fied with (Bolshevik Russia and,-after
denouncing the United. States in
public speeches confess . In private
that they would rather live In Amer
ica than anywhere else. -
RAH LIKE RABBITS
Both lived far Ilehlnd Front Lines
and Ran for Holes at First
Warning of Airplane
Spa, Belgium, Dec. 28. The for
mer headquarters of the kaiser and
his general staff la dicclosing some
extraordinarily queer fact these
days about tbe men who engineered
the world war. Take for one, Hin
denburg, Germany's superman, about
whom reams bave been written dis
closing, him as a fearless Napoleon.
Aa a matter of fact be spent & great
deal of time in -a wonderfully con
structed "funk hole" or dugout un
derneath the grounds of his villa
here.
Spa Is so far from where battle
lines used to be that it was almost
a day's journey in a fast motor ear
to get within sound of the big guns.
The kaiser, too, bad a similar hid
Ing place at Neubols, near a comic
opera trench system about which be
Is said to have paraded for the bene
fit ot the motion pictures. At each
ot their villas, there were delicate
electrical instruments which would
set up furious bussing whenever an
airplane approached anywhere near.
At the first sound from this con
trivance Hlndenburg and the kaiser
used to run to shelter. It is reported.
People who worked about Hinden
burg's establishment said that he
was continually running for cover.
ARLINGTON, WASH, MAN
UP FOB WHITE SLAVERY
Portland, Ore., Dec. 28. Glen A.
Campbell, of Arlington, Wash., baa
been sentenced to three years on
McNeill's bland lor white slavery,
under the Mann act. The complain
ing witness was a 17-year-old girl
a ward of Campbell's.
U.S.
GRAB TRADE IN SOUTH
New York, Dec. 28. United
States manufacturers and exporters
have Increased their trade in Brazil
and other South American coun
tries by more than 160 per cent
since the beginning of the war, ac
cording to J. W. Sanger, trade com'
mlssloner of the 'United States, gojr
ernment bureau ot foreign and do
mestic commerce, who recently re
turned from a survey of the. bus
iness opportunltiea south of the
equator. .
"Imagine ten large stores in one
big city and one ot these stores do
ing more business than all the other
nine combined," declared Mr. San
ger, "and that will give you some
Idea of the position we are In today.
It is an amazing record. We are
now. selling South American . coun
tries more than half ot everything
they import. Our total export trade
is now counted In billions of dol
lars."
0. s.
IT.
St. Ignatius. Mont., Dec. 28. En
gineers of the United State rechv
matlon service have arrived here to
investigate the storage possibilities
of Placid lake in the heart ot the
Mission range ot mountains, for
proposed Irrigation project of 20,-
000 acres between Missoula and Hu-
son. '
One ot the schemes of water sup
ply for this project Is to tap the
Blackfoot river above Bonner, bring
ing the water down through MIbbou
la to DeSmet. Other sources of sup
ply will be storage reservoirs in the
mountains.
'.Congress has appropriated f 100,
000 for investigation . and prelimi
nary, surveys looking toward recla
mation of land for returning soldiers.
WILSON SAYS
UNITED POWER
MUST PREVAIL
ADDRESSES . ENGLAND'S MOST
DISTINGUISHED CITIZEN'S AT
FAMOUS GUILD HALL
PRESIDENT IS 62 YEARS OLD
"Must No Longer Be Balance
of
Power Which Might Unsettle
Peace of tbe World"
London, De3. 28, Speaking In
tbe biatorio Guild hall at a gather
ing of England' most distinguished
statesmen. President Wilson reaf
firmed the principle that there must
no longer be a balance of power
which might unsettle the peace ot
the world, but that the future most
produce a concert of power which
would preserve It.
London, Dec 28. King George
called at the president's apartments
at 10 o'clock this morning and wish
ed him many nappy returns. The
president is 62 years of age today.
THE REAL ESTATE
DEALS TRANSACTED
George W. Pott recently purcha
ed the A. F. Melenlus tract of land
near New Hope. Mr. Potts and fam
ily are now living on the place.
Elmer G. Morey has purchased
one acre of land with a five-room
house on North Tenth street from
Mrs. N. P. Clements.
E. D. Stephens, of Gait, Cal.. ha
purchased a 200 acre farm of,E. H.
Wise, near Holland. There are
about 80 acres ot this farm in culti
vation and under irrigation and it
is now planted to clover and alfalfa.
Mr. Stephenson and wife have moved
onto the land and expect to make
their future home there.
The above, sales were all made by
Isaac iBest of this city.
BATTLEFIELDS DOTTED
Behind the Lines In France, Nov.
27. (Correspondence of the Associ
ated" Press.) This land of recent
battles is a queer land now. ' Over
the shell torn villages and blasted
woods, the pitted fields and the ruin
of all that once was. Is a strange
quiet. The winter sky is lacking In
airplanes and reat flocks of crows
have taken their place.
A few villagers have crept back
to see what remains of their homes
and holdings, but they are few and
probably the winter will have passed
before reclamation and reconstruc
tion are undertaken on a large scale.
Along the roads repaired and re-
bridged for the allies' advance Into
German territory, long camion
trains move slowly and always south
ward. They travel leisurely now,
for the need of hurry Is gone. They
bring back the salvage of battlefields,
all" the things that go to make war,
abandoned or captured.
Truck load after truck load ot
rifles and shells, ot water bottles
and haversacks, cartridges, machine
guns, bayonets and trench knives
and pistols, mess . kits, . overcoats,
capstan endless catalogue of para
phernalia are brought In. The battle
zone is still full of It all, In heaps
and racks, wulttng salvage.
. Albany, Ore., Dec. 38 J. E. Balch
an Albany, brakeman, ,wlll probably
recoverthough he fell 40 feet off a
railroad trestle near Summit shortly
after midnight last night. He was
unconscious four hours.

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