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Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, February 05, 1919, Image 1

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A
I'OU IX., No. H'J.
SENATORS RAP
NEW BRITISH
' EMBARGO ACT
CARNEGIE PEACE ACTIVITIES
AIIHOAD (KXIUC1 AND LOYAL
TV M QUESTIONED
8ys There Arc Already IliUf Million
Men Idle In United Htatr and
Would llnr immigrants
Washington, Pub. 6. Democrats
and republicans In the si-nu'e todojr
Joined In criticising the new llrltlsh
mbargo on Import. Several of
them attacked the Carnegie' peace
foundations activities abroad, ques
tioning Its loyalty, and declared that
It ahould be dissolved.
Washington, Feb. 5. Urging the
bouse rulos committee to give right
of war for the passage of legislation
prohibiting immigration for four
years, Frank Morrison, secretary of
the American federation of labor,
aid there were now 500,000 men
.without employment In the United
Btates.
HUNS WOULD NEVER
REPUDIATE WAR DEIJT
Munich, Feb. 5. 'The one debt
which Germany will never under any
circumstances would repudiate, no
matter how hard pressed It might
become, la Ita war loan,',' said a Ba
Tarlan financier recently, lie based
bis opinion on the fact that the war
loans are so thoroughly distributed
among the peqple that a failure to
pay any on or any part of any loan
would hit hardest those who can
least afford to lose. 1
Bavaria Is a good example of the
universality of the loan holdings, for
Bo less than 1,430,000 families, or
early everyone In the former king
dom, took at least some of the nine
loans. Alt of them are' of course In
timately Interested not only In the
payment of the loan they hold, but
ta the conduct of the financial affairs
of Germany. Reports of the amounts
taken by Bavarians In three German
, loans would seem to Indicate, when
compared with the 1.430.000 total
above, that hundreds of thousands of
persons subscribed over 'and ' over
again.-
The Bavarian savings banks, with
the deposits of relatively a small di
vision of the former German empire
Invested 471.500.000 marks In the
first olght loans, and their depositors
with money not In banks subscribed
another 293.300,000 marks. The
atate Insurance agencies against sick
BOSH, the Bavarian cooperative so
' duties, and tho ordinary liisurnnro
companies, added a tytal of 90,300,
4)00 marks to the first sevon loans.
Washington, Feb. 5. Insistence
by President Wilson upon tho admin
istration's policy of naval expansion
led to the unanimous approval given
by the house naval committee to an
other three year construction pro
gram. This was disclosed today by
Chairman Padgett of the committee
when the house began consideration
of the $750,000,000 annual naval ap
propriation bill. '
Mr. Padgett told of a cablegram
aent by the president from Farts to
Secretary Daniels, saying nothing
bad occurred over there to change
the recommendations he mado in his
annual message, to congress.
The message wob brought to the
attention of the committee by ,", -tr.
Daniels. "The president was very
earnest," Representative Padgett
said, "and very Insistent that the
three year program he carried out."
MORRISON URGESQUICK ACTION
ASKS FOR HAY
IN HONGR OF REDS
Indian Itulllod to Colors 0,000
Strung and llought $30,000,000
Worth of Lilxirty UoiitU
Boise, Idaho, Feb. 5. Chief Red
Fog Sklukuska of the northern
Blackfoot Indians In a memorial ad
dressed to Governor Davis of Idaho,
asks that the fourth Saturday In Sep
tember be. set aside as an Indian
holiday, In honor of the Indian par
ticipation In the war. The plea for
the designation of an Indian day is
made on tho ground of the "contri
bution made by original Americans
to the groat composite of white clt
Isenshlp," Chief Rod Fox Insisting
that both the history and the future
of the red man deserved considera
tion. "Wo have given to tho colors In
the great war 0,000 braves," says
the petition In citation Of recent In
dian achievements, "we have bought
150,000,000 In Liberty bonds and
donated 13.000,000 to the Red Cross
mother of humanity. The Ameri
can Indian's soul has been In the
world war. We know not the hy
phen; we know not the pro-thls and
pro-that; we are 100 per cent Amer
icans. The plea of Red Fox will be pre
sented to the state legislature, now
In session.
GERMAN PACTIONS . '.-
FIGHT AT BRUM EN
f
4- Copenhagen, Feb. 5. Ger-
man government troops entered 4
Bremen after bombarding the 4
4 city. The Spartarans retreated 4
4 from the city, but other armed 4
4 Spsrtacans are'oa thel way to 4
4' Bremen to take a hand in the 4
4 fight.' Many people are report-' 4
4 ed killed. 4
FRENCH FORCES SEIZE
DYE WORKS ON RHINE
Berlin, Feb. 5 The French forces
of occupation, according to a special
dispatch to the Vosslche Zeltung
from Frankfort-on-the-Maln, have
take possesion of the Hochter Dye
and Chemical Works and French
chemists are working with German
chemists In putting out dyes and cer
tain chemicals to be exported to al
lied countries.
MRS. ROOSEVELT SAILS
TO VISIT SON'S GRAVE
New York, Feb. B. Mrs. Theodore
Roosovelt, widow of the former pres
ident, suited today for France to vIbU
Quentin's grave. .
STRENGTH OF WIS
Washington, Fob.' 5. The total
strength of the United States army
on November 11 was 3,703,1173 In
cluding tho marine corps.
Tim war department table shows
that on July 1st the allied "rifle
strength" exceeded the Germans' for
the first time: "Rifle strength"
'means mon standing In the trenches
; ready to go over the top with the
! bayonet. ( Tho allied total was
,1,550,000, and the Germans 1,412,
1 000. On November 1, when the ene
my's reserves were gone, the allies
had a rifle strength' of 1,485,000, or
over two to one.
TRUSTS PASSES HOUSE
Salom, Ore.; Feb. 5. 'Representa
tive Sheldon's bill, aimed at the al
leged paving trust, passed the house
unanimously yesterday. The bill
forbids the highway commission' to
exact maintenance guarantees in ex
cess fff one year.
GRANTS PASS, JOKEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY B, 19l.
ALBERS FOUND
GUILTY ON TWO
OF 7
MAXIMUM PENALTY OS ' EACH
COUNT 910,000 FINE AND SO
YEARS IMPRISONMENT
JURY ARGUED : THREE HOURS
Judge Grant 30 Days Stay and New
Trial Asked Albert Out on 9 10,
OOO Bonds
Portland. Ore., Feb. 5. Henry
Albers was found guilty on two of
the seven counts today for sedition.
The maximum penalty on each count
s 110,000 tine and 20 years. The
jury deliberated about three hours
then brought In a sealed verdict last
night which was read at court to
day. The Judge has granted SO days
stay. New trial Is asked.
Albers was released on 110,000
bonds, the same as previously- asked.
GERMANY LOOKS TO FOOD
SHORTAGE IN THE SPRING
With the American Army of Oc
cupation, Feb. 5. German newspa
pers In the American occupied area
recently have warned the people of
a food shortage before spring. The
Germans are urged to economize In
food as they did day after day during
the war.
, The weekly allowance of food for
the civilians of Coblens aa fixed by
the German civil authorities la virtu
ally the same aa while the war was
In progress. The present price for
milk, which la allotted to infanta
and invalids. Is 87 marks a quart. m
TO GET BACK TO U.S.
Coblens, Feb. 5. When the cor
respondent entered one of the head
quarters offices today, the captain
was Just completing what appeared
to have been an Interesting lecture
to a German civilian. i
COUNTS
-just take my up," ne said, "and'out develops Into a state-wide strike,
stay right here In Germany where
you belong. They are laying for you
fellows back In the states and you
are a lot safer right here."
The auditor, clicked his heels, sa
luted and retired.
"What's the matter with the
bird?" asked the correspondent and
the captain explained.
"He's another of those .damned
Bodies that we call 'American citi
zens tor convenience.' We have had
about 'a dozen wanting passports to
the United States. They were born
in Germany, went to the United
States and took out citizenship pa
pers and then, according to their
stories, either Just happened to be
over here when the war started or
were forced to return and Join
the 'German army. Some fought for
four'jears.
"Now they know that hard times
are ahead of Germany and wiut to
go back to America, where It Is soft
picking. I suppose they will even
send American money over to help
pay the Indemnity.
"There are others who merely 'ORTH WILL SOON
took theli first papers and quit right j HAVE I,OXG HAYS'
there without a thought ot becoming ,
citizens. It was, merely convenient! Fort Yukon, Alaska. Dee. 21 (By
for them to be able to say they had mali)' Today Is the shortest day of
applied for citizenship. They also
say they love the United States bet
ter than Germany, but don't you be
lieve It. You; don't' hear of any re
fusing to turn their machine guns
on American troops. .
"Of course, we have nothing to do
with passports here, but we don't
tell the Boone soldiers that without
first telling them the welcome that
awaits them in the states it they go."
SEATTLE MAY
BE IN TURMOIL
BY TOMORROW
LITTLE HOPE OF KEEPING BO,-
OOO UNION MEN AND WOMEN
FROM WALKING OUT
MAY CLASH OVER LIGHTS
Faint Ray of Hope Gleaned From
Statement That Strike May Be
Only 24-Hour Duration
Seattle, Wash., Feb. 6. Little it
any hope for averting a general
strike tomorrow of 40,000 or 50,000
union workers Is held out. No esti
mate of how many thousands of un
organized workers will be thrown
out of work. '
Regarding the question of wheth
er the city will have lights, Mayor
Hansen said yesterday that the city
would be lighted, but the electrical
workers union leaders said that all
lights would be shut off. Including
the hospital lights.
Seattle, Wash.,- Feb. 6. The cen
tral labor council meets tonight to
approve a general strike date. . It
Is rumored that the men may make
the strike a 14-hour walkout only.
but union leaders refused to com'
ment on the matter.
Seattle, Feb. 6. Seattle labor
unions, defeated so far In their at
tempt to secure a general strike in
Tacoma' and other points, and 'with
their own membership here divided,
announced today through their
strike conference eommivtee that all
was lot readiness for the strike In Se
attle at 10 a. m. Thursday. This
strike, Involving an estimated 65,-
000 workers, including 25,000 metal
trade workers already out in ship
yards and contract shops, is said by
labor leaders to be the first general
strike ever held on the Pacific coast,
it. not in the country.
Support for the strikers came yes
terday In the announcement of the
Seattle Timberworkers onion that
3,000 lumber workers employed In
and about half of Seattle sawmills,
lumber camps and shingle . mills,
would Quit work Thursday. Mills
tn(i lumber camps outside of Seattle
imay not. he affected unless the walk-
it was said.
DEMPSKY IS OFFERED $25,000
TO FIGHT JESS W1LLARD
New Tork, Feb. 5. Tex Rickard,
who - has Jess Wlllard, heavyweight
champion pugilist under contract to
defend his championship title this
year, said here today:
I expect to meet Jack Dempsey's
manager, Jack Kearns, this evening,
and will offer him $25,000, and one
third of the moving picture privi
leges It he signs the contract to meetdustry In Montana would be the ea
Wlllard for the title.
"I will have the right to name the
referee of the contest, but I positive
ly will not act as referee myself,
"I have not the : slightest idea
where the bout will take place."
LONDON STRIKE NOT OVER
London, Feb. 5. There Is no Im
provement In the strike situation
here 'today.
, the year. Up here In the snowbound
and icebound country beyond . the
Arctlo Circle that fact would not
be known, however, were It not for
the almanacs, tor the sun has not
been, seen for days. '
Fort Yukon Is In the country, of
six months' night and six months'
day, Six months from now the sun
will remain above the horizon the
entire 24 hours ot the longest day.
U.0FD.T0RECEIVE
in
Ways and Means Committee Tenta
tively Votes $100,000 for Wom
an's Building at Eugene '
Salem, Ore., Feb. 6. The bouse
contmlttee on salaries has recom
mended that the salary of supreme
Judges In Oregon be Increased from
14,600 to 15,250. The sum original
ly requested was 16,000.
The ways and means committee
tentatively voted to allow tha Tint.
versity of Oregon f 23 5,000, includ
ing 100,000 for a woman's build
ing. This latter sum is conditional
on the same amount being raised by
the university. '
New Fish Code -Salem,
Ore., Feb. 5. A new fish
and game code for Oregon has been
Introduced In the house by Dr. Earl
C. McFarland, representative from
Multnomah county. It makes many
additions to the protected list of
game birds and some slight changes
In the open season dates. In general
the measure Is Intended to tighten
up on hunters' rights and afford
more protection for birds and game,
ARMISTICE KILLED
Butte, Mont, Feb. 5. Signing of
the armistice November 11. 1(18,
automatically ended the manganese
Industry in Montana aa it made pos
sible the release of snipping for the
importation of -this - product, from
Brazil and Cuba at a lower figure
per ton than it could be produced In
this atate.
"Only another wart) and we hope
mere win never De another one,
said one of the chief engineers of
the Anaconda Copper Mining Com
pany," can revive the industry in
Montana. The outlook Is hopeless
although jthe Anaconda company, at
the request ot the government con
structed a terro manganese plant at
Great Falls at a cost of 750.000.
This plant produced approximately
1,350 tons of manganese, which car
ried manganese content of 80 per
cent, 10 per cent iron and 4 per cent
slllcla. It was especially desirable
for steel manufacturing becaus ot
Its concentrated manganese, but not
a pound had ye been sold when the
armistice was signed, consequently
we still have it on our hands."
ijurazu ana Cuba can deliver, on
the wharves of Baltimore manganese
tor $12.50 a ton whereas its cost of
production to Montana producers is
approximately $10 a ton to which
must be added the freight rate to
Pittsburg of $11 a short ton
"It is impossible to think ot a tar
iff large enough to make profitable
domestic production of manganese
said the Anaconda engineer. "The
only thing which could revive the In
tabllshment of steel .manufacturing
in Great Falls, ' so as to eliminate
freight rates. It is questionable if
manganese production could be de
veloped to an extent large enough to
warrant this."
Coblenz, Feb. 6. tfhree Germans
have been convicted during the last
three days of circulating enemy pro
paganda among the American troops
in the occupied area.'
A shopkeeper offered to sell watch
fobs with the American and German
flags crossed upon It. Postcards
were confiscated, showing a beauti
ful German woman with tiny Ameri
can, British and French soldiers
dactng at the end ot strings, to her
caprlo. :.. ..
WHOLE NUMHEIt 2583.
PEOPLE WORTH
MORE TO STATE
THAN ARE BIRDS
SUCH IS THE ARGUMENT PUT UP
AT SALEM IN MALHEUR IRRI
GATION PROJECT
BILL TO MAKE UKE RESERVE
Attractive Colored Girl From Port
land Lobbies for Intereste of
Her Race
-''
Salem, Ore., Feb. 5. Proponents
of a big. irrigation project planned
for eastern Oregon, with . Malheur
lake as a bssls, have promised to
give lively opposition to the bill by
Representative McFarland, of Port
land, proposing to give Malheur lake
to the United States government for
a bird reserve. This action was re
commended by Governor -Wlthy-
combe' In his message to the legisla
ture, i
That people are of more ralue
than birds will be the plea of the Ir
rigstlonlsta, who claim their project
would reclaim the Malheur lake
country for farms for men and wom
en and should take precedence over
any game and sporting project. They
declare that the bird reserve bill
would kill the Irrigation scheme.
Salem, Feb. 6. A new lobbyist
has appeared at the legislature, la
the person ot an attractive colored
girl, editor of the, Portland Advocate.
She came to Salem in the Interests
of Representative Coffey's-bill for
bidding discrimination against ne-.
groes In theaters, restaurants, places
of amusement and public gatherings.
OVER MILLION IN '
CONTRACTS ARB LET
- ; ' ''
Portland, Ore., Feb. 5. The
highway commission has award-
-f ed contracts 'on eight projects
f- to cost over a million dollars,
including work In Douglas,
Benton and Jackson counties.
' The . commission will expert-
ment with camps for discharged
soldiers only. The first will he
In Morrow county. Contractors
are to favor returned fighters,
and work -for thousands will be
provided. - , -f
ONE ON THE JUDGE
Oklahoma, Okla., Feb. 5. "Morn-
In', Judge." '.
"Drunk again. Twice In
two
weekB." ,
"Not guilty. Same drunk." ,
Fred Stuckey paid $19.
it
L
WAS DULY REGISTERED
Vladivostok, Dec. 23. Japanese
military records undoubtedly contain
the name of an American ' general ,
connected with tho American expe-'
dltlonary force which does not ap- '
pear on the American fcrmy roll. A '
group ot American engineers were
returning from Harbin recently la a
special .car, A Japanese officer push
ed his way Into the car and demand- .
ed to knew who the occupants were.
One ot the engineers answered that
the car contained 21' American offi
cers. .'
"Who Is the senior officer?" pur
sued the Japanese. --. ,
"That's enough began the
engineer. -
"General Enough?" interrupted V
the officer.' ';"'""""'.'
"Yes, General Enough," said the
engineer. : . ;
The Information was duly noted
iu me Japanese officer's notebook.
Fl! '

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