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Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, February 07, 1919, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96088181/1919-02-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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fAliltifl
Brow
, VOL. IX., No. Ml.
GRANTS PASS, JOSEPHINE COUNTY. OREGON, FRIDAV, FEBRUARY V7, 1010.
WHOLE NUMBER MM,
1 11 lilt! it
Ml MM MB
3
" h
. I)
LYNCH MAKtS' oALt HHIIibb utN 4
AN APPEAL FOR FROMJWCITIES
r rvr rn i n
ruKintK hiu
. . .
overnmont's Offering at Vancouver
Like Dig IbuJUtr l'roMTty Kept
Under Heavy Guard
THANKS BANKERS FOR PART IN
WAR AND URGES Til EM TO
STAY UNTIL FINISH
BOLSHEVISM PRESENT MEHACE
"It Una ItUMtia by Uie Tliroat, While
Aniiruliy Bit on Throne With
' lUoody Sword, Bays Lynch
Bun Francisco, Feb. 7. Vaccinate
the nation with thrift aa a prophylac
tle against "Bolshevism" U the ap
peal of Governor James K. Lynch
Of the Federal Reserve bank In a let
tar sent yesterday to all bankers of
the Twolttb Federal Reserve district
thanking them (or their aid during
the war and urging continued sup
port until the "Job Is finished."
"Ware are generally followed by
pestilence," wrote Governor Lynch.
"Spanish Influence, starting In Eu
rope, raged a year before we gave It
much attention. Working westward
It attacked our physical health and
thousands of our people died. . .
"There' Is another pestilence rag
ing la Europe which Is menace to
our financial and national health. It
la called 'Bolshevism.' It has Rus
ala by the throat. Anarchy sits on
the throne with a bloody sword In
one hand and a flaming torch In
the other. The disease Is also work'
lng westward. Already It Is knock
ing at bur doors. No quarantine will
keep It out. Our Bbst remedy Is the
war savings stamp. Let us vaccin
ate the whole nation with thrift.
"It la fundamental that no man
. will seek 'to overthrow the govern
ment that owes him money. Banks
ahoulrt encourage the sale of war
savings stamps. As the heritage of
war let us permanently secure to the
American people the blessings of
thrift."
Every section of the United States
and Canada' la represented dally In
the bids that are pouring In to be
considered by the sales board of the
United States Spruce Production cor
poration In its sate of property val
ued at 110.000,000.
Offices of the rales board In the
Yeon building at Portland, Oregon,
art constantly filled with represen
tatlves of big firms and with Individ
uals who themselves wish to bid on
this or that piece of machinery or
equipment or some of the material
most of which Is now assembled at
Vancouver, Wash., at which placj
the sale will occur.
No bids will be received after Feb
ruary 15.
Never In the history of the coun
try has there been such an array of
property assembled In one place as
that which Is now stored In and near
the corporation's big cut-up plant at
Vancouver. Crowds of prospective
purchasers are being shown through
the yards dally. To Inspect the pro
perty permit from headquarters Is
necessary, as It Is all kept -under
constant armed guard.
TIW1E IS NOW AT HAND TO
HWMERIANII
, ; . ' t :i r.
HERO OF 1877 DIES
QUIETLY AT HOME
During Nea Pearca Indian War Made
Ride That Ranked With Famous
Ride of Paul Revere'
Laborers Given Until 8 o'Clock Tomorrow to Call
"Sympathetic Strike" Workmen Wavering at Tacoma
Walkout at Butte Trouble at San Francisco
Seattle, Wash., Feb,
Hanson has served notice on
strike committee that unless
.7. Mayor . San Francisco, Feb. 7. Major
the .General John Morrison, command'
the lng the western department of the
sympathetic strike Is called off 'by
8 o'clock tomorrow he will take steps
to operate all essential Industries
and place the city under control of
the federal government.
army, has gone to Seattle to take
charge of the strike situation there
and at Tacoma.
Seattle, Feb. 7. On orders, of
Mayor Hanson the municipal street
car made a trip to Ballard and re
turn' without hindrance. 'Detectives
accompanied the car. . Regular car
service Is to be resumed aa fast as
crews can be obtained. The mayor
issued a proclamation guaranteeing
absolute protection, and' asking the
people to go about their business as
usual.
E
Washington, Feb. 7. The sailing
of five more transports from France
with 5,700 men, mostly former na
ttonal guard units, has been an
nounced by the war department.
The- transport Mercury Is due at
Newport News February 16 with the
69th regiment coast artillery com
plete, bound tor Oregon. About
three hundred Oregon men are In
the regiment and the rest are from
the Pacific coast. They went from
Fort Stevens.
STATE L
WILL VISIT COLLEGE
Oregon Agricultural College, Cor-
vallls, Feb. 7. Preparations are be
ing made to entertain the state leg
islators Saturday. The visitors will
arrived by speclnl train In the morn
ing and will find the college In full
operation, arrangements having been
made for classes scheduled the fol
lowing Monday to be held that day.
SPECIAL ELECTION 4
HE H Klil) IN JUNE 4
4
Salem, Ore., Feb. 7. Gover- 4
nor Withycombe will call, a 4
special session of the leglala- 4 of a strike of 1,200 military prison-
trire as soon as the reconstruc- 'ers in the army prUon at Fort Leav-
tlon commission prepares a pro- 4 .enworth, Kan., Secretary of War
gram. The legislature will re- 4 Baker has teen compelled to head
ter the program to the elector- 4 itheir complaints of gross Injustice
4
4
4
4
4
4
GERMAN WoSfEN APPLY .
. , TO YANKS FOR A JOIi
Coblens, Feb. 7. Three' hundred
Gorman women factory . workers,
many of them widows of soldiers, ap
plied recently to the Third American
army headquarters In Coblens for
employment, contending that ' with
the ending of the war they had been
thrown out of work. The question
of employing the womon as members
of American uniforms was taken un
der consideration.
WILL TALK
PEACE WITH THE REDS
Paris,'- Feb. 7. William Allen
"White, of Emporia,' Kan. and Pro
lessor George Davis Herron . have
been appointed American dolegates
to the Marmara conference with the
Russian factions. '
Seattle, Wash., Feb. 7. The1 po
lice reported that no disorders oc
curred during the' early morning
hours. All troops sent from Camp
Lewis have arrived.
There are no .signs of a break In
the opposing Interests and the union
leaders are looking to Charles E,
Pies tor the first move. No attempt
to operate the street cars baa been
made. ' ,
Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 6. The
"We have 1.B00 police and 1.600 "
regulars from Camp Lewis," aald the " w,lB
mayor, "and will get the services. It nt" they return to work and submit
necessary, of every-aoldler In .the"""r Merey ma
Pacific northwest to protect life, bus
iness and property. The time has
come to show our Americanism and
anarchists in this community shall
not rule Its aafflrs."
Tacoma, Wash., Feb.. 7. The
president of the street carmen's un
ion and manager of the Tacoma
Railway Power company have con
ferred and declare, that street cars
hall be run as soon as they can
guarantee , ample protection from
"mob violence."
' It Is reported that "Paddy" Mor
ris and half a dozen other active pro
moters of the general strike left In
automobiles when the troops arrived
last night. . - j ,
3. W. Slaught, director of public
lty of the corporation,! said Charles
E. Pies, director general, made this
statement ' before departing for
Washington late today.
Slaught said the director' general
waa firm and would not recede from
the stand he had taken, aa published
in Pacific coast newspapers.
Pies, according to Slaught, said he
would call a conference Immediately
upon the men's return, to work, but
until they did so he would have no
dealings with them.
Tacoma, Feb. 7. Some of the
unions here hare returned to work
(Continued-on page 1.)
Til PRISONERS D
EDAM
DEAL--CLAIU objectors aae favored
OLDORDERHAS
GUN
E
ASMS
CHANCELLOR
Missoula, Mont., Feb. 7. In the
death of William C. Murphy, who
passed away recently In Seattle,
Wash., Montana lost one of her early
day heroes. In August 1877, Mr.
Murphy made a ride that ranks with
Paul Kevere's in the memories of
pioneers of the treasure state.
The Nez Perc Indians, 'under
Chief Joseph, were threatening a
raid down Cedar gulch, where placer
miners were working and had cross
ed over the mountains from Idaho In
great force. Mr. Murphy, who was
at the time In Cedar gulch, took- the
gold the miners had panned $40,
000 worth In all and rode horse
back to Missoula, where he deposit
ed It in a bank.
He then galloped on to Deer
Lodge to arouse the country. The
entire ride of 160 miles he made
without rest, except to change horses,
eating In the saddle. As a result.
the settlers rose and the Indians
were met with a. force formidable
enough to hold them until the army
could act
Mr. Murphy was 72 years of age
at the time of his death. ' He was a
pioneer' merchant 'and an Intimate
business associated of the late Mar-
GERMAN PEOPLE NOW DETER
MINED TO RULE THEMSELVES,
BATS EBERT AT WEIMAR
SOCIALISTS TO RULE CABINtT
Allied Premiers Dissatisfied With
Affairs and Are Framing Stiff er
Terms for the Hans -
caa Daly.
'.t-.u
1
ONLY A FEW DAYS KORE-
TO BUY NITRATE SUPPLY
Oregon Agricultural College... Cor
vallts, Feb. 7. The time limit tor
buying agricultural nitrate haa been
extended by the federal government
to February 15. Farmers wanting
to participate In the federal supply
may do so through their county
agents or other authorized agency
only. ..The price Is $81 a ton plus
freight charges from San Francisco.
Connty agents or farm bureau heads
should be notified early to Insure
getting the orders tilled. '
Weimar. Feb. 7. The ofd order
in Germany has gone beyond recall
and the people are now determined
to rule themselves, declared Chancel
lor. Frederick Ebert, In calling the
national assembly together at this
place. The chancellor said: "We wlU
call on the old spirit of Weimar. We
will be an empire of Justice, of
truth." ., , ; .'-. '
The process of temporarily remov
ing the German seat of government
to Weimar from Berlin was begun
yesterday. .
The present government considers
Its mandates expire with the eonven-,
tag of the censUtneat assembly and
its first task, will be to move the m.' ".
mediate appointment of a new coal
ltlon government, In the organiza
tion of which party interests will be
eliminated. . ' ..... .. '
, The majority socialists will hold x :
the first party . caucus . Tuesday
morning. The German democratic
faction will hold Us party meeting at
Erfurt, near here. .
It. Is believed that the new pro-'
visional cabinet will be made up of .
majority socialists, democrats and
clericals. '
' , :;" i
Paris, Feb 7. The allied pre
miers will meet today: to fix .- new :
terms to-be .imposed upon Germany,
whose tactics of obstruction and re
erimatlon are reported to hare
reached a climax at Weimar when
Chancellor Ebert threatened . that '
Germany Would break, off negotia
tions with the allies. .
ANOTHER OREGON MAN
OUT OF GERMAN PRISON
Washington, Feb. 7. As a result
ate at a special election to be 4 In trials by court martial during the
held not later than June.
war.
"BLUE RIBBON" ORDER;
So grave was the situation for a
few days that General Leonard Wood
commander of the central depart
ment, rushed troops to Leavenworth
to guard against any outbreak.
Colonel Sedgwick Rice finally ef
fected a truce with the striking
prisoners pending a submission of
their grievances to Washington. He
arrived in" the . capital Wednesday
(Bv and conferred with Secretary Baker,
grievances. The committee stated
that all appeals to the military au
thorities to right the Injustice from
which they suffered had proved un
availing and that their only recourse
was the refusal to obey orders, what
ever -the punishment might be.
There was no violence In connec
tion with this mutiny and before or
dering troops to compel the prison
ers to work,' Colonel Rice asked the
kommlttee If the prisoners would
agree to obey orders pending his
presentation of their grievances to
Secretary Baker. The strikers later
went' back to work while Colonel
Rice enme to Washington.
The prisoners also were aggrieved
by the recent act of the secretary of
war by, which 125 conscientious ob
jectors were released. These object-
Washington, Feb. 7 Eller Storms
of Boring, Ore., has arrived in
France from a German prison, the
war department announces.
Paris, Feb. 7. The question of
the demolition of the ring of antlqu-
4 TOTAL V. S. ARMY 4
4 CASUALTIES TO DATE 4
Killed in action (Including
381 at sea) - 31,186
Died of wounds ...... 12,978
Died of disease 19,045
Died from accident and oth
er causes 2,757
Wounded In action . 159,279
Missing In action (includ
ing prisoners) 11,183
Total to date
.236,428
Nonana, Alaska, Jan. 2.
mall). ,The epidemic of Spanish in- Judge Advocate General Crowder and
fluenza In Nenana and. Fairbanks is In..,ect0. 0aneral chamberlain. The
apt to go down In Alaska history as matter was scheduled to be brought ors Tiad been confined for their re
the "blue ribbon". period, by reason t0 tn8 ftttenlIon ot congress today ! fusel In any way to aid the govern
or on oraer oy ine imunc ueiwwi u- ,,th th. .,.. of tmmndlata ln-'mont In fha nrnaannMon nf tha war
thorltles. This hoa compelled every ,,, i j -,r,-m. tk.. i.. , i . k.
the hat or coat a . . . w ala a rnaaA a An .nv o-nrir tIon would be useless.
i ii t ii nf . t . Alio rvuuri annuo y vuiuiirji uiid i v mj w
piece of blue ribbon, lettered Health ym alarmlng conditions at the of a civilian nature. The striking ' already been brought up before
me council, it aaies uses, irom
1884.' The plan however would have
to be referred to parliament by the
municipal council after It's adoption.
Louis Dausset, an alderman .of
ate fortifications which surrounds
Paris will be brought up before the
municipal council during the course
of the next few' months. This ,1s
not as a result ot the armistice or
because the league of. nations which
is expected to put an end to wars
forever or because of the fact that
with modern artillery the fortitlca-
The matter
HENRY FORD NEAR DISLOYALTY
Washington, Feb. 7. Henry Ford
came to the verge of disloyalty, It he
did not go over It,' Elthu Root today
told the Bpeclal house committee
that Is investigating the activities of
the National Security League. ,
The attempt to defeat Jeanette
Rankin for re-election to congress
was a public service, Root stated.
Department," for which a fee . ot Uavenworth mlutarT prlson u re. ! prisoners asserted that the recalclt-
'""- " ' piete with concrete proof of the bar-rants had objected because they were
a I' .n f VA DarU nd. unfairness of the present opposed to he principles on which
and persons falling to wear a ribbon tAm..mtrA.nn , m,( Itfc I, , ,ti,. o,..m
Were subject to arrest and quaran- . . . ' . I , . .
tine confinement. ;lno f- p,nBoners retU8M 10 . . tV V, i i X! . . , .V
The fees tor the' ribbons have or 0D8y Pr,Bon auinoruies on me u
w .... . ,i-. ground that they , were vthe victims '. nd pronounced them "treas-
i of official persecution and unduly se-"aol objectors."
trans to Nenana and Fairbanks and'6 tor comparatively trlt-
of iAranflnln travelnra. ; Vnt a.llu ""os
single case of Influenza has develop
ed Tiers or In Fairbanks.
What further angered the prison
ers was the fact that, the objectors
not only were released, - but were
The striking prisoners sent a com
mlttee to Colonel Rice to state their paid $400 to $500 each.
the city of Paris is sponsor for the
project. He argues that the bene
fits to be derived are a closer, easier
contact with the Paris suburbs, elim
ination of the necessity of entering
or tearing Paris through the various
gates - and the freeing of valuable
land for building purposes, ' ''
CALLS FORTH A STRIKE
Berlin, Feb. 7. The whole city ot
Dusseldort Is in the grip ot a general
strike as retaliation. against Sparta-,
can terrorism. The executive coun
cil of the Communist government
had threatened to call a general
strike of all the . bourgeolse classes .
It their demands are not granted.

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