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Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, March 01, 1919, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96088181/1919-03-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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lli!!li0i!l' GRANTS PASS. JOHKPH1XF, COUNTY. OREGON, ATlllOAV, MAKCH I .Hit;",;; - t . --.-'-- WHOLE NUMBER 2mt
KEPT J
B
RENEWED ITS
CLASH ,OF FACTION FOB , 81'.
I'llKMAt'V CASTS DEEP GI.OOM
OVKIt ENTIRE EMPIRE
RAILWAY SERVICE PARALYZED
ImlKtM lnt HodiOUla Protest
Against I'slng National Army to
Supprras Ifoluribniicro
. Ilorlln, Mar. 1. Central Germany
U In tba thrown of a widespread po
litical strike affecting iuriio parts of
Saxony, Thurlngia and Anhalt, and
throuRh Ita efforts unm railroad
communications Is custlng a slnlstor
hadow over the entire nation.
The workmen la Lelpslc voted, by
a. tremendous majority (or a general
strike. Today Ixilpsle Is without gas
or electricity or railroad communi
cation. The strike at Halle, which
Inrludos the railway moil, continue,
and even telephonic and telegraphic
communication Is being Interferred
with. A general strike has broken
out at Erfurt and In many other
cities In contrnl Germany.
Basel. Mar. 1. More than two-
thirds of the miners In Central Ger
many are on strike, and the strikers
-everywhere nave bogun to occupy
the railroads and poatoffleea, accord-
Ins; to Berlin advices. The govern
ment, however, hopes to reestablish
order by the use of large military
forces.
Dnsel, Mar. 1. Hugo Hasse, the
Independent socialist leader, during
the third reading of the national
army bill In the German national as
sembly at Weimar, protested against
the employment of the national
army In re-establishing order In
Germany. He accused the govern
ment of breeding violence. War Min
ister Noske, In reply, called attention
to the part played by Russian agents
In the present movement, Insisting
that It was necessary to put a stop
to their activities.
BOY STEALS FOR GIRL
BUT NERVE FAILS HIM
Great Falls, Mont., Mar. 1. Ono
of the boldest cases of cattle rustling
In the history of the state ts charged
to a boy of 18, now held by the sher
iff's office here. The lad asserts the
motive was to obtain money to set
tle hospital bill for a young girl
friend, who was seriously Injured In
nn automobile accident through, the
youth believes, his fault.
The boy, It Is chargod, roi'e Into
the country and drove IS steers off
a ranch ton mlloB from the city,
brought them to a slaughter house
here and sold them. He claimed to
he acting as nuent for n well known
rancher, It ts snld, to whom tho
check was made out. The hnv'p
heart failed him and the check was
never cashed. Tho sheriff has re
covered a portion of tho Htoclt but
the rest had boon slaughtered. The
hutchnr Is holntr held for the value of
the stock.
4444444444444444444
would kkim'm, i.ontv
V TAX ON CLOTHING 4
4 4
4 WaBhliiRtoit, Mar. 1. Tho 4
'f houso has panned ond sent to 4
4 the senate a resolution provld- 4
4 Ing repeal of tho luxury tax 4
4 clause of the war revenue) Mil -4
4 which Impound n 1 0 per "ent, Hx 4
4. aftor May 1 on higher priced 4
4 cothlng and many other nr- -
4 tides. .4
4444444 44444 4444444
IN TURMOIL
UN BtATEn FOB Hmtt Mil I M 1(11 1 pn IN DD TAKES IP PRESIDENT nil)
Jl LniLIIUI IIUUJL
Gillutt of MnxNiM-hiiMrtlM Nominated
on Hint Ballot Miule Unanimous
By Mimn's Motion
Washington, Mar. l.T-llepresenla-tlve
Frederick II. Olllett, of Massa
chusetts' was nominated on tne first
ballot by the republican conference
as the party 'candidate for speaker
In the next house of representatives.
Representative James R. Mann, of
Illinois, ran second, with Represen
tative Philip Campbell, of Kansas,
who entered the race a few days
ago after Representative Simeon D.
Fess, of Ohio, .had withdrawn, far
behind. As the republicans will
have a majority In the next house,
nomination was regarded by them as
equivalent to election.
The official vote as announced by
Representative Horace M. Towner, of
Iowa, chairman of the conference.
follows:
Glllett, 138.
Mann, (9.
Campboll, IS.
Scattering,' 5: 4 for Represent
tlve John J. Each, of Wisconsin, and
1 for Representative Frank W. Mon
de)!, of Wyoming.
Immediately after the ballot was
announced the election of Glllett
was made unanimous on motion of
Mann.
LICENSE TAX WILL DO
Salem, Ore., Mar. 1. Thanks to
Den Sheldon, of Jackson county, the
peojile of Oregon will pay a sum for
their automobile licenses substantial
ly less than the scale set forth In
the new state motor code as origin
ally adopted by the senate Thursday
afternoon. When the bill was re
turned to the house for concurrence
In amendments, Sheldon took a de
termined stand that the senate had
Increaaed fees beyond reason, and
lined up the' house In a refusal to
concur. A conference committee,
composed jointly of members of the
house and senate, was then appoint
ed and finally compromised upon an
appreciable reduced scale.
As the code now standB, motor
vehicle licenses In the state are In
creased approximately from 100 to
ir,0 per cent. The Increase will not
bo sharply felt, however, as the code
provides that motor vehicles will In
the future be exempted from the
personal tax heretofore assessed by
the various counties.
The final agreement on the ached
tile for motor cars follows:
All. steam, gasoline and hydro
carbon operated vehicles (except
motor trucks having a rated max)
mum load carrying capacity one ton
and over and up to and Including 23
horse power) $15 In excess of 23
horsepower and Including 26 horse
power, 332; In excess of 26 horse
power and Including 30 horse pow
er, 328; In excess of 80 horse power
and Including 36 horse power, 336;
In excess of 36 and Including 40
horse power, 348; In excess of 40
horse power, ,356.
WOODROW GIVES OREGON
SENATOR COLD RECEPTION
WiiHhlnRton, Mar. 1. President
WllHon and Senator CRnraberlaln of
Oregon, chairman of the senate mili
tary committee, met Frldny for the
firHt, time Blnce tholr controversy of
more than a'yonr aw when the pres
ident wrote a letter sharply crltl
eliiliiB tho senator for his Now Yorlt
speoch In which lio snld certain gov
ernment bureaus "had almost cens
ed to function."
Senator Chamberlain called to pny
Ms respects to the president, who
was nt the', capital conferring with
nnntors and representatives, ''
'The president shook Chamber
lain's hand once and the smile on
his face disappeared. Gravely bow
ing, the president .released Mr.
Chamberlain's hand, and without
si'onUlns turned to greet another
senate. ,
THE GREAT
General March MakeVPctlic
jleadsj)eath &t-W American Forces, Second Reg
ulars Reciev'e Most Distinguished Service Crosses
Washington, Mar. t 1. Battle
deaths during the war among all the
participants, as far as statistics are
available, show that 7,354,000 men
met death during the world,' war,
General March announced today.
This represents the men only killed
In action or who died of wounds'.
Russia leads the list with 1.700.-
000, Germany 1s second with 1,600,
000, the United 8U)tes last wth 10,
000. France lost 1,885,000. Eng
land 800,000, and Italy 460,000. ,
General March announced that of
a total or 3,918 distinguished ser
vice crosses awarded for gallantry
DEBT JEWELL SENDS .
There Is- on display in Geo. Cal
houn's window,- 603 O street, a col
lection of German war relics sent
V Dwlght Jewell to Miss Clara Cal
houn for safe' keeping until he re
turns home. The collection- Includes
two officers helmets of patent leath
er with dull finish ornaments. T,hee
are new and have never been worn.
There' are also a belt with buckle, a
pipe of typical design, a small silver
locket with leaves on .which are pho
to scenes, a pair of "goggles with
steel coll springs Instead of rubber
cord, shoulder straps, buttons, leath
er case for identification cards, a
furlough badge with a photo of the
kaiser, and one of the famous Iron
crosses, -which the kaiser lavished
on his fighting men. This cross is
edged with silver and suspended
from a ribbon of black and white.
Dwlght Jewell ts a member of the
37th engineers,. 1st Bat., and Is In
the army of occupation.
WENATCHEE APPI.K SHIPMENTS
Wenatchee, Wash., Mar. 1. Ship
ments of 9,400 cars of apples' and
other fruits were made from the
Wenatchee district along the Great
Northern railroad during the last
summer and tall, which Is 2,000 In
excess of any previous, year, accord
ing to J. M. Gruber, vice president
and general manager of the Great
Northern, who recently made a tour
of Inspection of the Hue through the
district.
BARRED FROM THEIR NATIVE SHORE
Fi4f& tt
, Three 'officers ot Iho RrltlxlKiili- senicc. hut . Aim-rlcmsM hy Mhii, have
been burred from landing on their native shore by a peculiar ruling. Lieut
Edward Rutlles of Brooklyn, Llout. R. R. Knnpp of Brooklyn iiml,t!lent. V. L.
Hnlgbt of Chicago arrived nt Boston on the transport Slelltu.' Beemise of a
rullug which bam all but returning American troops from landing, the three
Americans must 'return to their starting point nt Brest.-1 --
WORLD WAR
Staggering figures--Russia
to Americans, 664, or more than
double the number given any other
division, went to the .Second Regu
lars'. The First division was next,
and the Third division was third.
Washington, Mar. 1. A cable'
gram from the military attache at
Rome announces that the 332nd
American Infantry has been ordered
concentrated at Genoa. Tbey have
heretofore been divided between Cat
taro, Flume and Trieste. General
March said that no orders had yet
been Issued for the regiment's re
turn to the United States.
L.
TEAMS PLAY TONIGHT
There promises to be an exciting
game of basket ball tonight at the
Central school when Roseburg girls
will meet Grants Pass girls, la the
first out of town game of the season
tor the Grants Pass team. - ;
The Roseburg girls arrived this
morning . from Medford where they
played last evening; the score be
ing 17 to 16 tn favor of the Rose
burg team. At Ashland the previous
night the Roseburg team won by a
score of 18 to 15. -i-
The Roseburg players are Maxlne
Sykes, eaptaln; Rose Brlscome, Lu
cile Myers, -Ruth Burnett and Teka
Haynes,' and they' are accompanied
by Vernlta Kohlhagen, manager;
Ruth Ann Wilson, chaperone; and
E. E. Thornton, of the faculty. '
The Grants Pass players are Cath
erine Baker, captain; Murial Myers,
Mildred Taylor, Vernetta Qulnlan,
Lynetta Qulnlan and Thelma Robln-
The Grants Pass team and mem
bers of the high school and faculty
entertained the Roseburg team at
lunch at the Oxford today.
SEATTLE STRIKERS WEAKENING
Seattle, Wash., Mar. 1. Striking
shipyard laborers' representatives
went Into conference today to con
sider a referendum vote on the ques
tion of returning to work but they
may defer action until the meeting
at Tacoma tomorrow. '
AT PEACE LEAGUE
Assert Proposed Plan of Wilson
and Toft Would Strike Down
.Constitutional Principles
Washington, . Mar. 1. Senator
Knox, of Pennsylvania, assailed the
league of nations as striking down
American constitutional ' prlnclplesr
and proposed a new world organiza
tion which he said "would preserve
the Monroe Doctrine and aave Amer
ica from the results of European In
trigue and aggression."
Washington, -Mar. - 1. Senator
Hardwlck, of Georgia, democrat.
has also attacked the league of na
tions plan, saying "it would require
conscription of our sons to police
the world."
Washington, Mar. - 1. Senator
Lodge Issued a call today for a con
ference of republican senators to
consider whether concerted action
will be taken In an effort to force
an extra session by opposition to the
Victory loan bill.
MORE RIOTS EXPECTED
London, Mar. 1. Further revolu
tionary movements In Germany are
Imminent according to- a -report
from Holland. -Chancellor Scheide-
mann Is reported to have resigned.
2,500 TROOPS .NEARLY.
-lew York, Mar, 1. The transport
Sobral which arrived today ' from
France, nearly capsized while dock
lng when orer 2,500 troops massed
themselves on the starboard side-to
greet their relatives and friends,
who were on barges alongside. The
ship listed to 15 degrees. The cap
tain threatened to have the ' fire
hose turned on the troops when they
showed foluctance to go to the port
side. -The pumps were set working
and the ship righted. .,.
FRENCH TROOPS DRAWN
BACK ACROSS THE RHINE
- London, Mar. 1 , French . troops
unexpectedly evacuated' Mannheim
Wednesday,' according to a Berlin
dispatch forwarded by the central
news correspondent at Copenhagen
They also withdrew from the Karl
sruhe and Rhetngan to the left bank
of the Rhine, the message adds.
A Mannheim dispatch under date
of February 37- said -entente troops
were ' to occupy the : Mannheim
bridgehead at noon February 26. No
announcement of the actual occupa
tion,' however, had been received.
The occupation was apparently "plan
ned because of disorders in Mann
helm. 1020 CENSrS BILL PASSED
Washington, Mar. 1. -Final action
was taken last night in the senate
on the bill providing for the dectn
nlal census of 1920. -
The conference report on the
measure recently adopted by the
house was approved by the senate
and now goes to President Wilson.
WILL ANSWER QUESTIONS
CONCERNING THE. OIST
Seattle, Mar. 1. Lieutenant Col
in V. Dyment, Red Cross searcher
with the 91st division will establish
headquarters here, probably late In
March, and will write to -Mie rela
tives of the 1,200 or more men of
the division who were killed or
wounded, It was announced here to
day by the northwest division of the
Red, Cross.
Lieutenant Dyment, the Red Cross
announced, has detailed Information
regarding every casualty In the 9 1st.
Lieutenant Dyment Is on leave ot ab
sence from his duties as head of the
University of Washington depart
ment of Journalism.
DENT DID
NOT D
THIRD TERM
MERELY REMARKED- THAT HE
YEARNED TO RETIRE FROM
OFFICE AND WRITE
If Republicans Fall to Endorse Peace
League, Democrats .Will Be Free
To Go Their Own Way '
Washington, Mar., ,-1. Regarding
reports that President Wilson told
democratic committeemen,"" 'wco
lunched with him yesterday, that he
would not accept the nomination tor
a third term, it wa stated at the
White House that the subject was
not discussed. The president mere
ly remarked that he yearned to get
back to 'writing and Intended com
piling a history. Some gained, the
impression that the president meant
to retire to private life after his
term. ..
It is also said that the president
evinced a deep feeling against op
ponents to the league of nations.' He
thought it should be -. an American
and not a partisan issue, but If the
republican state committees should
reject the proposal: to endorse. the
league, the 'democratic state com;
mittees would be free to act Inde
pendently. . . , . .
" -n t...
SPOKANE PAINTEBS' ' ""-
WANT HIGHER WAGE
' - ' '' ; i.i.r.i:
Spokane. .Wash., Mar. . l. About
100 union painters struck for an in
crease from f6 to 7 a day.
ARE WOMEN TAKING ;uU - -THE
"SMOKES" FROM MEN
- ;: .-ii ; ' Kr f-i ?
. -London, - Mar. , 1. -London - has
been suffering lately from a scarcity
of tobacco, 'notably of cigarettes. '
This, according to John Pearson,
president - of '-the national union -of
retail tobacconists, is due to the fact
that the shipping control only per
mitted 10,000 tons, of tobacco ,,
month to come Into the country,
while more people smoked than' formerly.'-
There were more women
smokers, he said.-.---
HONS NOUGHT DOWN'
32
Coblenz, Mar.' 1 Twenty-two Am
erican observation - balloons' 'Vefe
destroyed In the war, most of them '
by German aviators. One fatality,
resulted, the balloonist's parachute
catching fire from sparks from the
burning balloon, Sach balloon cost
38,000, and i the expense tor infla
tion was about $360 for gas.
Anti-aircraft guns used to protect .
observation balloons accounted for
four German aviators. In each case
the enemy Hying machine being
brought down after the aviator had
set fire to the American balloon by
incendiary bullets.
AID SOCIETY STOPS DIVORCES
New York,, Mar. 1. The Legal
Aid society ot New York prevented
2,800- or more divorces In 1918, ac
cording to the annual report made
public -here today by Charles E.
Hughes, president of the society.
444. 4 444-44444 4 444
4 ARE FIGHTING FISH 4
4 RILL TO THE IfAST 4
4 ' 4
4 Salem. Ore., Mar. 1. Gover- 4
4 nor Wlthycombe ha3 received 4
4 numerous protests against hts 4
I 4 signing the Rogue River fish- 4
4 ing bill and the bill prohibiting 4
4 Injunctions against labor or- 4
4 grfnlzatlons. - 4
44444444 4 4444444
i .

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