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Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, May 05, 1919, Image 1

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VOL. IX., No. tiW.
n.?(T8 pass, jokei-iune county, Oregon, Monday; mav s, 1010.-
WHOLE XI'MDKH 2650.
V
r
OREGON THIRD
IN GREAT RACE
' TO FILL QUOTA
!OllTLANI. WIIK'II WAH IIOMK
I .Ml TIIK HTATK HACK, WKXT
OVKK TOP KATUIOAY
IOWA AND MICH LEAD
Nation IukiiK l'X ""d i',xrtv
(iUuM HrroU I'wnt Appeal to
ntiaen to lta W Soldiers
Portland. May 4. y an oversnb
crlirtlon of I5H.175. totaled at
o'clock Saturday nlKht. Portland
had passed It quota of $M,7Rfl.32i.
with returns still coining In. The
total talon for the day had reached
the word of I2.S22.4SO, making '.p
Incomplete total of I14.S44.600.
By the closing effort of lt cam
paign, as clean and pwerfur as a
word sweep, Oregon haa ct the knot
of Ita victory loan quota and an
nounced to Iho nation that her tank
In the fifth Issue la finished. The
atata quota of 2fl. 747,550 li over
all haorlbed.
Third of the slates to fin I nil the
tak and flrat on the Pacific coast,
the atata of Oregon laya claims to be
ing the first atato In the sisterhood
to close Ita victory quota 1y popular
subscription. Iowa and Mlchlnan
which have already cloned their
quotas, are generally understood to
.fcave dona 10 through the aid of tlinlr
banks, which are aald to have under
written the allotments. But Oregon
drive haa teen a genuine appeal to
her citizens who have responded.
In view of the fact thut the Vic
tory loan campaign l two-third
over and only one-third of the sub
scriptions ruined, Carter OhiBB, secre
tary of tbe treasury, haa aent out
the following appeal from WnshlnR
ton to every atata In the union:
"The Victory Liberty loan cam
paign la two-third over, but ' sub
scriptions have been reported for lit
tle more than one-third of the loan.
"Is It eoncolvablo that the Amerl
' can people who with heart and anul
' waged the fight for freedom will
permit thla loan of victory and
thankaglvlng to fall?
"Our anna gave of 'their health, of
: their atrongth and of their Uvea that
freedom might not perish. There
are one and a half million American
) 'boys In Prance and Germany. Now
" that the war la ended It would be aa
reasonable for them to dishonor the
nation by deserting the flag -as for
the nation to dishonor Itself by de-
sorting them. Is It a lnrge thing that'
. we are now aaked to lend our money
J to pay the cost of victory Is Amer
ican monoy lost willing that , Anicrl
' can manhood? ' .' '
; "lot everyone of the millions who
; have bought Liberty bonds 'buy Vlc-
'.M tory notes and success Is sure."
M
GREECE WILL NEVER
F
Xanthl, Greece, May 6. Greece Is
Indebted to the United States for
many things, but she probably will
remember longest the aid given by
American Red CroBS to the 60,000
or more refugees' -who 'have boon
coming back from 'Bulgaria and Asia
Minor over every 'road and mountain
pass. Unable through Us own a son
des to care ifor this Immense number
of homeless and destitute people, the
Greek government left the task' to
America's big; relief organisation
King Alexander (Premier Venlzelos
and the Greek government have a!
roady testified , their gratitude for
this assistance which -was mads pos
Ible through the generosity of the
"American people. '
II ROBBERS GET
AWAY WITH $7,000
Hold l p WnolioiiKal, Wuoli., lliuik
('iixliler, Hut ldy AlMtant
Have 50,000 lit Bonds
WuahoiiKul, WuHii., May 5. Two
umsked men . robbed the Clarke
County Hunk here of $7,000 In allver
and currency at 9:30 o'clock thin
morning. They em aped In a imull
automobile, -with an Oregon number.
The robbiira forced the cashier
und two young women assistants to
hold up tbelr hand and also cover
ed a patron who enter the bank.
Thuy look nionuy from the aafe but
overlooked S50, 000 In Liberty bonda
Just taken from the aufu, because
Mia Kutbryn Kep, assistant and
daughter of the manager of the
hunk, barked K'.ilt a desk and
concealed the bonda.
Waaliougal, Wanti., May 5. It la
reported here that the two rubbers
rounded by ahrdlu rmfwy vbgkqJIT
left their automobile and have been
surrounded by a posse on the Hill
ranch, near Broad Prairie.
OF HOME INDUSTRIES
At the Chamber" of Commerce
luncheon today, which waa composed
entirely of Oregon products, Presi
dent Dram well announced the band
organization meeting for' tonight
and Invited all who cared to to be
present. He then called on A. O.
Clark, niunuuer of the Associated
Industrie of Oregon, who spoke on
the wolt being accomplished by the
organization he represents. He
gave many fui'U about the vastnees
of Oregon Industries which were new
to Ms hearers, and named many ar
ticles being manufactured In Oregon
which have a national sale. By the
use of strikingly orlglnnl compari
son lie drove home the Important
points of hlrf address.
Mr. Clark aald In substance:
"Tlio effort of the Associated In
dustries of Oregon la to create good
will for the products of Oregon's fac
tories. M-.iny people do not know
Hint Oregon leads aU western state
In the manufacture of furniture,
flour and cereals, woonna, macca-
rnnl and other, paste, fruit jilcoa
candles and crackors, and many, of
these linos are now being a IvrnlseJ
and distributed In every state in the
union. They received thU nvignl
tlon only upon the basis of quality
and service, and all that Is aaked of
the products Is an even break from
the Oregon consumer. The govern
(Continued on page S.)
iifuutiim
First Lieutenant Nell Allen, billet
lug officer at Brost, 'France, has
been iputtlng nils newspaper exper
ienre to good advantage and a tew
months ago established and ihas since
beon conducting the "Pohtanezen
Ditt'kboard," the official newspaper
of Camp Pontanezen, Brest, France.
On the first dozen Issues he cleaned
up a neat rum as profit. . Lieutenant
Allen is now an authorized corre
spondent for the United Press and
has made a trip to Paris for that or
ganization. , Lieutenant Allen secured his
newspaper experience on the Daily
Courier and on the Stanford Quad,
on whioh hfi was editor for several
years. ; ' , 1
f HKC. HAKKIl KKTl HXS 4
' , ' :. .: I
New York, May 5. The U.
f 8. trana-port George Washing- 4
f ton, .with Secretary Baker and
f K.00G troops ' aboard, arrived
here today. :,
f
mm
FOR RED ARMY
OF 100.000
DKKPKItATH EFFORT TO HOLD
m.VUUV MEN W LINE TO
FIGHT ADVANCING AltMY
COMMUNISTS ARE DEFIANT
Roumanians and Serbians In Move
ment to Encircle Hungarian Cap
lti 4'ufnmunlntM Iao Munich
Vienna, May 5. The political sit
uation In Budapest remains unchang
ed. The Hungarian communist gov
ernment denies that it has acceded
to- the demands of the Czech, Rou
manian end 8erbo-French troops, In
volving the surrender of Hungarian
territory.
The Budapest soviet government
is making a lost effort to build a red
army which It la roughly eetlmated
will nuntber 100.000 officers and
man. Many of these soldiers are
huugry and It la said that probably
one-third are willing to tight.
Vienna, May S. It Is stated In al
lied circles that the commander of
the Czech, Serbian and Roumanian
troops have decided not to occupy
Budapest, confining their operations
to an encirclement of the Hungarian
capital.
Vienna, May - 6. 'Alexis Bolgar,
representative of the Hungarian so
viet government, on returning to
Vienna today from Budapest, found
the Hungarian legation occupied by
counter-revolutionary forces. Bol
gar waa refused admission to the.
legation.
It ia stated that the officers found
large sums of money in gold and
English notes and also stocks and
bonds at the legation.
(Continued on Page 2)
WIFE OF HAN SHE
Seattle, Wash., May 5. Love for
the husband of another woman, and
her determination to possess that
man which resulted In the deliberate
poisoning and death of the wife, Is
the charge against Ruth Garrison,
1 8 years old Seattle girl, who now
will battle for 'her own life In the
courts. Her case Is said to be one of
the most remarkable In the crime
annals of the state for, according-to
the confession the police say she
made, this slip of girl arranged
and calculated the doom of her ri
val with all the care and cold blood
edness of any of the famons poison
ers known to history. Her trial be
gan here today, with crowds throng
ing the courthouse.
1 Iluth Garrison, on March 18 last.
Invited Mrs. Grace Glats Storrs, 28
years old, to luncheon with her In
the tea room or a department store
and, according to the confession the
Garrison girl is said to have made,
placed poison in a cocktail designed
for her guest ibetore the latter's ar
rival. Death came to Mrs. Storrs In
the emergency hospital of the store,
' Douglas M. Storrs, the dead wom
an's husband, an automobile me
chanic of Okanogan, Wash., surren
dered soon after, claiming he knew
nothing of the case, bejng in Okan
ogan at the time. He was arrested
on a felony charge. iMlss Garrison
Is said to have confessed she visited
him at Okanogan where she register
ed s Mrs. Storrs. :' '
Miss Garrison's attorneys, Thomas
M. Askren and A. R. mien, entered
the girl's plea of ''not guilty." ' They
asserted the girl was Insane "When
she poisoned Mrs. Storrs' but later,
they claimed, regained her sanity. (
"What's the matter? Are you
RUTH GARRISON
RAIL DEFICIT
FORWOVER
$400,000,000
81CII PKKIIt?riOJf IS MADE ANT)
TAXPAVE118 WILL HAVE TO
MAKK IP DIFFERENCE
CONGRESS -TO DISPOSE OF R. R
91,000,000,000 In Additional Wage
Said to He llurden That May
Never Be I led need
Washington, May 5. Preliminary
figures on March earnings of all rail
roads controlled by the United
States railroad administration Indi
cate earnings In round figures of
$10,000,000. For the first three
months of 1919 the earnings will, In
round' figures, aggregate $42,000,
000 as against requirements to pay
the standard return of $70, 000, 000
Allowing for final adjustments wnen
all detail figures are in for the first
quarter there Is In sight a positive
deficit of $125,000,000 for this per
iod as between the real earnings and
the amount guaranteed to tbe own
ers of the various properties. "
. Halt billion dollars deficit tor
the year, as thus indicated, will un
doubtedly be favorably affected by
the better trafflo' conditions which
always prevail In the second six
months of the year, yet it Is impos
sible to expect too much from Ira'
proved tratTiCcondltions during the
last half of 1919. Allowing proper
offset for improvement in business
there will be a deficit for the year
of from $350,000,000 to $400,000,-
000 unless a modem miracle is per
formed. With congress soon to assemble
In another effort to determine the
fate of the railroads there is increas
tng Indications that another increase
in freight rates is Inevitable. Those
(Continued on page 3.)
LOVED, IS ON TRIAL
111?" witnesses said Miss Garrison
asked Mrs. Storrs as the latter sat
across the table from her dytng from
the effects of the fatal cocktail. Al
though the .police thought possibly
Mrs. Storrs took her own life, they
held Miss Garrison for a few hours
after the death of Mrs. Storrs but
later released her. After the autopsy
disclosed the manner of death, Miss
Garrison again was taken into cus
tody at 1:30 o'clock on the morn
ing of March 19 at tbe home ot her
uncle J. D. Esary, president of the
Island Transportation company.
Miss Garrison at first denied she
knew anything about, the cause ot
Mrs. Storrs' death. All day ot the
19th ehe held to the point but later
took the police to the drug store
where -she bad purchased the poison
and told them in detail ot her' ac
tions on the day of the death.
"I was crazy," she Is reported to
have said. VI acted on an Impulse
that came to me the morning before
I lunched with 'Mrs. Storrs." . The
girl shed no tears. "It is too late
for that now," she Is stated to have
satd. tMles Garrison's one expressed
hope was to be permitted to . see
Storrs.
' "I love htm with all my iheart arid
soul," she -said. "Will they let me
see him? Will he still care for met
were her constant questions.
1 Storrs was not allowed to see Miss
Garrison. He stated however, that
he intended to do all he could to
help her. ' He did not appear anxious
to see the girl nor did he express any
desire to attend his wife's funeral.
1 Scores ot sympathetic letters have
been received by Miss Garrison while
friends have aent her candy . ! and
. flowers during her detention.
ACCUSED OF POISONING
mm MTS
WILL BE AWARDED
Hid to lie Opened for 103.24 Miles
of Oregon Highway Nexton
Mountain Among the Jobs
Contracts for 105.24 miles of road
work will be let Tuesday by the state
highway commission, providing the
prices of the contractors are light.
These contracts will about complete
me program lor the current year.
Bids are asked for 56.74 miles of
grading and macadamizing and-tor
48 miles of paving. The work is
scattered along the Pacific highway,
tbe Columbia river highway and the
old Oregon trail. 1 '
When these contracts are let, tbe
Pacific highway will be practically
all under contract, for ' 86.44 per
cent of the mileage to be let T aes-
day is on .the Pacific highway.
Tbe longest job Is for paving 14.8
miles in Jackson county, pn the Pa
cific highway, from Green Springs
mountain road to tbe California line.
Among the other contracts to be
let are the followng:
Benton will receive 3.24 miles;
Clackamas, 6.8 miles; Douglas, 21.-
35 miles; Gilliam, 12.3 miles; Jack
son, 32.8 miles; ione. io. miles;
Union, 6.5 miles, and Washington,
4.3 miles. - '
Jackson county will tare well. In
addition to the 14.8 miles from
Green Springs mountain road to tbe
California line, which will be paved
there Is grading and paving job of
5.8 miles from Ashland to the Green
Springs mountain and 12.2 miles of
grading and paving on the Gold Hill-
Josephine county line section.
In Josephine county' there is 7.6
miles t grading on the Sexton
mountain section, calling for excava
ting 118,000 cubic yards of earth.
Douglas county will have both ma
cadam and grading. There Is a one-
miles section from Comstock to Pass
Creek to be graded and macadamiz
ed; 3.25 miles Qf grading and ma
cadamizing between Drain and Le
ona; a section ot 1.2 miles ot grad
ing and macadam from Oakland
south; grading and macadam tor
miles between Winchester and Rose-
burg; 6.7 miles ot grading and ma
cadam from iRoseburg ' to Dilla'd,
and 7.2 miles of grading and maca
dam from Jacques place v to ' Johns
place.
FIRST OF 50,000
SAIL FOR FRANCE
4-.
4-
New York, May 6. The first
contingent, consisting ot 1,000
men, ot the 50,000 troops vol
unteering to relieve an" equal
number ot doubhboys now with
the army of occupation will sail
from here tomorrow. .' ;
4-
4-
444444444
OREGON CLAIMS THE
Washington, May 6. A " dispute
has developed between Oregon and
other states which have passed their
loan quotas. Edward Cookingham,
chairman of the Oregon campaign
telegraphed Secretary Glass that
Oregon oversubscribed by popular
subscription and that he understood
Iowa and Michigan made records
because their banks guaranteed the
bonds. , ' - '
Oregon claims to be the first to
raise her quota from -popular sub
scriptions. ' The treasury depart
ment is investigating. '
4 BOLSHEVIKI FLOTILLA
4 DEFEATED BY .ALLIES
4 ,. .
4
4'
4
4
Archangel, May 5. -The bol
shevtkl flotilla on the . Dvina
again attacked the allied posi
tions near the Junction 'with the
4' Vaga river Friday, but were
4 driven" off by the allied ' land
4 batteries, which outranged the
4 enemy's guns. '4
44444444444444'4444
BELGIUM WILL
SIGN AND ITALY
ILL RETURN
PLUCKT LITTLE NATION WILL
PLACE FATE IX HANDS OF
"BIG THREE"
AT
Hungarian Soviet Government In
dign-.nl Over Tans of Affairs,
While Budapest Is In Panic
44444 444444444444
Paris, May 6. It is officially 4
4 announced here today that the 4
4 treaty will be handed the Ger- 4
4 mans on Wednesday afternoon. 4
444444444444444
London, May 5. Belgium will
sign the peace treaty .despite the
feeling at Brussels that the financial
and economical territorial aspects of
the pact are unsatisfactory. At the
meeting of the crown council held
at Brussels Sunday It was decided to
sign.-, - -
The printed draft of the treaty
will be completed and presented to
the Germans Wednesday. It is be
lieved that some arrangement - for
Italy to participate in the Versailles
ceremony will be reached. . . ...
Austria's delegation to the confer
ence is reported to have met at Vien
na and will probably reach Paris
soon after the Germans have receiv
ed the treaty.- The decision to sum-,
mon the -Austrlans is expected , to
have some Influence on. the return
ot the Italians; also the fact that
Italy would be without voice in the
disposition of Germany's colonies.
The organization of the league ot
nations will be perfected today) -
Finnish troops that occupied Pot-
rograd and Red Guards.
The soviet government of Hungary
is Indignant at the seisure' of the
Hungarian legation t "Vienna-'- -by
counter revolutionary forces and de
mands that German-Austria take lm-,
mediate action to arrest those In
volved. " ' ' ' ' '" ' ' , " ' ' '
Meantime Budapest is In a panic
over the menace to that city-from the
approach of tbe Czechs, Serbian and
Roumanian troops. , , . ,. .. ,..
Paris, May 6. Premier Orlando
and Foreign Minister Sonnlno are to
return to Paris tonight, according td
reports received here;-7-"! -'-M '-
SEAPLANE FLIGHT
DELAYED BY RRE
New York. May 5. Fire at the
naval air station at Rockaway Beach
today damaged the vnaval seaplanes
NC-1 and NC-4, which were to start
tomorrow on the first leg of the
trans-Atlantic night. The blaze
started from an electric spark, Ignit
ing gasoline. The start will be made
tomorrow, nevertheless.
Washington, May 5.- Roger C.
Tredwell, Amerlcan consul arrested
by the Russian bolshevik! last Octo
ber, haa arrived at Stockholm. -
. . , - j
San Francisco, May 5. The con
victions and sentence ot Hulet Wells,
Sam Sadler, Morris Pass and' Joe
Pass, of Seattle, tor conspiracy' to
overthrow the act declaring war on
Germany were upheld hy the federal
circuit court ot appeals here.- The
men were sentenced 'for two years
for Issuing a circular, as members ot
the "no conscription league."

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