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The times-herald. [volume] (Burns, Harney County, Or.) 1896-1929, July 04, 1914, Image 1

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CITY OF BURNS
mt
COUNTY OF HARNEY
The Biggetl City In The Biggest
The Biggest County In The State
County In The State Of Oregon I
T G?
Of Oregon, Beat In The West I
VOL. XXVII
BURNS, HARNEY COUNTY, OREGON, JULY 4, 1914
NO. 34
-it iMpxir I n
Jwfy'Jw WW'VJ
LROAD EXTEND TO
HARNEY
tumor That Contract is Let for Forty-
five Miles West From Riverside.
This Would Complete Road to Dog
Mountain and Give Impetus to The
Development of Big Country
The Times-Herald has late ad
vices to the effect that the con
tract has been let for another 45
miles of railroad west from
Riverside and that it is to be
built at once. This would bring
the road into this Valley, in fact
it would likely bring it to Dor
Mountain, the original objective j
point.
This is the persistent rumor at
! Juntura and along the line of
road from Vale in. Should this
be done it would transform this
hie i-iinnf rv in the immediate fu
ture and brinar in a larsre number
I of paople who would at once be-1
gin active development of the
lwuuirops
It is logical to expect this as
there is certainly nothing in
bringing the road into the canyon I
and stopping at Riverside. It
would be of little or no benefit to
the people of this big agricultural
ootinn na if is not nrotitable to
raise produce and haul that dis-
tance even if the roads were ol
the best. The Times-Herald un- ot some ol our oest larm lanos.
derstands the road to Riverside
is an impossible one so far as Market Report.
hauling loads is concerned, there
fore the road could not expect ! Receipts for last week at the
anything of tonnage from the Portland Union Stock Yards have
big Harney country, nor can the been cattle. 1663; calves, 169;
country be expected to develop' sheep,, 6640; hogs. 8771.
'as a tonnage producing section i Cattle liquidation large this
Until the railroad is within reach ( week, Monday having about 1200
q the farmer. 'bead. Prices held firm for the
fjiis news isn't verified by any first half, but eased off toward
one jn authority but men of the close, especially on medium
standing are responsible for the Rrade stuff which comprised the
report. Should ll oe a iuci nar-
ney county will take on new life
and much activity may be ex
pected in the immediate future.
P. L. S. Starts Injunction
Suit on Adjudication.
suit instituted, in the Ignited
Sjtates District Court by the Pa
cific Live Stock Co., naming the
State Water Board, C. B. McCon
nell, K. and U Cole, Harney Val
Uv Improvement Co., Silvies
Riyer Irrigation Co., William
Hanley Co., R. R. Sitz, Fred
FRIEND OF THE PRODUCER
Burns Meat Market
and
Packing Plant
BACON, HAMS and LARD
Fresh Meats. Poultry
Borne Products for Home Consumer
SPCIAL INDUCEMENTS OFFERED
TQ SREEP MEN AND WW QBDEB8
For
Use
spiw
It Is prepared to meet tie demand of Dainty
Women for a preparation that will overcome all
odora of peraplratlon. It Is the last touch In a
finished toilette.
REXALL DRUG STORE
REED RROS. Props.
The Burns
MRS. ETTA CUMMINS, Prop.
Beat Surgical Room and Equipment
H (he flfnte ntlde of Portland,
Nice Rooms, Good Care and Com
fort for Patients-Reasonable Terms
Graduated Nurse in Charge
VALLEY NOW
Otley and M. B. Hayes as defen
dants, will likely result in a fur
ther delay of the adjudication of
the rights of the water of bilvies
River. The matter comes up in
Portland on August 3 for consid
eration and the injunction is
sought on the ground that unless
it is granted the complianant will
suffer irreparable injury.
The writer has not seen a copy
of the complaint but understands
the complainant will attack the
constitutionality of the law and
try to show the Board has no right
to adjudicate the water rights o
f
streams. In view of former
suits of a similar nature it would
seem the Board has such riKht
and while it will delay the matter
the rights will yet be determined
and the people finally know iust
what they are entitled to. It
surely is to be regretted that this
is to be delayed as the endless
litigation and uncertainty has
caused much expense in the past
and has prevented development
m0t (,t the weeK S receipts.
Best light fed steers 17.60 to
$7.66. grass $7.25 to $7.40; cows
$6.50 to $6.65 with few choice
tops at $7.00; bulls $4.00 to $5.00.
Swine run not of large volume
for the last week in June, Mar
ket holding steady at 8c. at the
week's close. Outlook good and
uymg demand above the aver
age Sheep house continues to hold
strong. Receipts of sheep and
lambs good, and prices steady
with last week. Top yearlings
selling around $5.00, two year
,.i,)u a 7fi ewes 4.25. lambs
$;.)0
Uiun V "-" "" ' . T . ..
Mutton trade in excellent
shape.
Dainty Body
Purity
Rexall Nice
Hospital
Dog Mountain Sunday
School Picnic and Dinner
(Communicated)
The Sunday School patron of
Dog Mountain will give a picnic
dinner at the oil well on Sunday,
July 12, dinner at 60 centa per
plate.
This is to be a gathering of joy
all Harney County. Every-body
wants to see the big drill, every
one wants to see and talk over
the prospect of the grandest un
dertaking old Harney has ever
seen. The best speakers and the
best singers and the beat looks,
of the county will be present
We especially invite Messrs F.
Davey, J. Byrd, H. Levens, Cap.
Gowan. Wm. Hanley and C. A.
Haines to address the crowd.
And Band Boys, won't you
come and make the grand old
mountain resound with sweet
strains "Yankee Doodle!" And
the candidate for office that don't
show his sneaking face don't get
my come on.
This in a way will be a grand
old reunion, bigger than a dance,
bigger than the Fourth, bigger
than Christmas, in fact bigger
than anything but the grand old
valley itself and its glorious pros
pects. We want every old pio
neer and Indian fighter to be pre
sent and behold this country aa
it is today and tell us of it as it
was years ago. Grease up your
hack, crank up your automobile,
put on your glad rags and come
along.
Pat Finds Big Harney
Country is Prosperous
The Juntura Times says: The
writer has just returned from a
trip of some six hundred miles
through the southern end of this
and Harney county, and wish to
say that we found conditions in
every part of the country we vis-
ted in a most flourishing condi
tion. Sheep men are feeling
good about the prices they ob
tained for their wool, and join
with the cattle and horse men in
saying that this is the best grass
year they have ever seen since
coming to the country. The trip
was made by automobile, leaving
Ontario on June 5th, in company
with J. W. McCulloch, who acted
as chauffeur of u own car, go
ing out through Skull Springs,
Barron Valley, Cord and Alber-
son. thence south to the Nevada
line and back via Catlow Valley,
the P Ranch and Burns. On
every hand one can see evidence
of improvement and an increased
area of cultivated lands. Catlow
Valley is settling up with a pro
gressive class of people who are
making good in raising crops un
dry land,, f he lower end of the
famous P Ranch will soon be un
der a complete system of Irriga
tion aa Mr. Hanley is having
canals and ditches built that will
carry water out of his forty mile
drainage ditch and deposit it on
lands that are now covered wtyh
sage brush. Several large wp-
structjon pamps aye now Ufl the
ground and rapid progress ia be
ing made. This perhaps the
cream of the entire Eastern Ore
gon country, ana ww ne me
granary and meat producing sec
tion of the state. Uota of new
land is being put under cultlva
tion in Harney Valley, and crops
are looking fine.
Surprising Cur of Stomach TrOttfe1,
When you have trouble with
your stomach or chronic consti
pation, don't imagine that your
case in beyond help Just because
your doctor fails to give you re.
lief. Mrs. G. Stengle, Plalnfleld,
N. J-, writes, "For over a month
past I have been troubled with
my stomach. Everything I ate
upset it terribly. One of Cham-,
berlain's advertising bopkjeta
dame to mu, Afr wftdiag a
few of the letter from people
Who had been cured by Chamber.
Iain's Tablets, 1 deoided to try
them. I have taken nearly three
fourths of a package of them
and can now eat almost every
thing that I want" Fur sa.le by
all dealers,
The Clay Clemens wwrnill it
now at its new location and is
prepared to fill any order with
rough or dressed lumber, also fir
lumber; buck teeth and any
special order given prompt at
tention. 82.
STATE AND FEDERAL IN
VESTIGATION OF RABBIT
State Fish and Game Commission Will
Have Aid From the Government in
Work of Ridding Country of Pests.
Rabbits, Gophers That are Menace
To Farmer to
E. W. Nelson, of the United
States biological survey, notified
William I.. Finley, of the state
fish and game commission, yes
terday that the $6000 item rec
ommended by Senator Chamber
lain was still included in the agri
cultural appropriations bill when
it came out from the conference
committee, says the Journal.
This $6000 will be used in co
operative work by the state game
department and the biological
survey and will incidentally put
Oregon on record as being the
only state, with the exception
of North Dakota, that has
given the federal government
material assistance and entered
into cooperative work of this
kind. It. was largely through
the efforts of Mr. Finley that the
appropriation was made.
Among the problems waiting
to be solved and on which inteli
gent action can now be taken,
Mr, Finley states, are several of
first importance to the homestead
er. There is the extermination
of jackrabbits in the eastern
counties, the determination of
the species of gopher that is a
menace to the farmer's fields. In
the past year Tillamook county
hus paid out in bounties $4000
for gophers.
An examination of the crops of
pheasants killed in the grain lit Ids
has shown their food to consist
principally of insects and in only
one instance was any grain found
and that proved to be barley from
the previous year's crop. So it
may be that the pheasant is be
ing wrongly accused and that his
work is beneficial, not destructive
There is also the census of bird
life to be taken and by which it
ia determined to what extent
game and song birds increase
under federal protection as given
by the migrajory bird law re
cently put into effect By mak
ing close observations on specifi
ed areas for a number of years
it is believed that a close census
can be secured. It is found that
the best time to make a count on
any area is shortly before and
after sunrise, in the mating sea
son, as at that time all the male
birds are in full song and can be
easily located.
At the present there is a party
of federal and state scientists
camped on the McKenzie river
engaged in ru,akjng a thorough ll
survey pi fa una,! lifw of the Wil-
lu,..tw, ualUu roirinn I .ni.r
similar surveys will be made on
the ooast and in other parts of
the state, the work finally result
ing in a complete hiologleal sur
vey of Oregon.
UTIST KVEIOPMEKT LEAGUE NOTES '
(Prom Om Portland Oorrcapondcnt
The fostering iu agricultural
deVchiumeut was indorsed as the
most important work of Oregon
communities at the annual con
vention of the State Bankers
Association, at Medford, and at
that of the Retail Merchants'
Association at IaGrande. Rcso
lutioiis were adopted by both or
ganlsatlons urging bankers and
business men 10 pom MW
efforts to rmg experienced far -
mers into the state, help them to
locate on lands at reasonable
pnees and assist the farmers
now new jo an IWiaw M'
psntf. .w umtou '' -
per, ounuing anu rauroau con
struction is more than counter- j
oaianceu in wregon ,n ui? wm -
ion of the bankers and merchants,
by success m agricultural lines.
Good crop prospects were report-
eo rrom every couniy in me
state.
Cove, In Union County, will
hold a cherry fair on July 10. A
Norwegian family, the Stack
lands, has led in building up a
great cherry industry at an alti
ude of 3,000 feet in the foothilt
be Exterminated
of the Blue Mountains. At this
high altitude cherries, while not
so large or lucious as some raised
on lower levels, have remarkable
keeping qualities and the output
will be disposed on in carloads in
the Eastern markets.
O. M. Plummer. general man
ager of the Pacific International
Livestock Exposition, announces
that the National Duroc-Jersey
Record Association, of Peoria,
111., has appropriated 126 for the
livestock show to be held in Port
land this fall, thus placing this
event in the ranks with the other
large stock shows of the United
States, a recognition which has
not heretofore been made.
That the population of Oregon
is increasing very rapidly is indi
cated by the fact that an unusual
number of commodities have
found it necessary to erect new
school buildings to relieve con
gestion. New schools arc being
built at Amity, Molalla, Newport,
Astoria and Vida, and in addition,
several large school buildings will
be erected in Portland before the
end of the year.
Within the last week " carloads
of Oregon woul were shipped
from Madras to Boston. The
shipment aggregated 290,000
pounds and was sold at prices
somewhat in advance of those of
last year.
Farmers Should Know
Their Insect Enemies
Oregon farmers must learn to
know their insect enemies before
they can combat them so success
fully as to stop the enormous leak
due to their ravages. The infor
mation and material that will en
able them to identify the most
common and destructive pests
are easily within their reach and
may be had by Bimply writing
for a copy of the Biennial Crop
Pest Keport. issued by the Ore
gon Station. A condensed edi
tion of this report has also been
issued by the Extension division
of the Agricultural College and
may be obtained by writing for
"Insect Pests of Truck and Gar
den Crops," to Extension Divis
ion. O. A. C, Corvallis.
"In my work as school agricul
turist." says a member of the
N tension, "I was able by means
of the Biennial Report to Identify
und control every insect and dis
ease pesunaiauacKcu ourscnooi
gardens and the home gardens.
Descriptions are plainly written
and the various stages of the
insects accurately shown by pho
tographs. Many of these views
are printed in the natural colors
of the pests, and by reading the
descriptions and studying the
pictures any farmer in Oregon
can soon learn just what pest is
attacking his crops.
' 'Both disease and insect reme
dies are given in connection with
the story of the pests, so that
control becomes merely a uiaUi-v
f making appiicatioft cording
to directions. found it beat to
take up the study of one pest at
J a me wew nard ureB8ea
I fly devoting a few minutes each
1 aayfor few daya reading
, about t and comparlng it with
the nitrations, i neVer failed
to ,earn 1(J ldentity and iife hia.
tory. Control measures folowed.
1 au a matter of course
"Identlfleatlon of one or more
I peals is an exceueni exercise lor
, wnt.twhOT meetings, school
raUiea Rnd aimihr KatherinK8 in
which Hv teacneni meet tWj
Bohuol patron,.
Christian Science services Sun
days Ham., Wednesdays at 8
p m. Reading room open from 2
to 5 Wednesday and Saturday
afternoons. First door east of
stairway, Hissner Bldg. Cordial
invitation extended to all.
Dunkard Colony to Locate
Homes in Central Oregon
The names of more than 800
families who are interested in
Central Oregon and may come
there to locate were secured last
week at Seattle during the na
tional convention of the Dunkard
Church by I. W. Gray, agent for
the Oregon and Western Coloniza
tion company, says a Portland
paper.
Mr. Gray returned from Seat
tle yesterday, and in Portland
on his way home to Redmond he
reported that he had achieved
great success in his campaign to
interest the thrifty and prosper
ous Dunkards, whose religion
does not permit them to take up
the bankruptcy law.
Most of the delegates to the
convention were middle aged or
elderly people and Mr. Gray says
that it would be a hard thing to
induce them to leave their pros
perous eastern homes, but he
found them anxious to make pro
vision for the rising generation.
Many of these people expressed
to Mr. Gray their desire to send
the young people to the great
western country.
To the 800 whose names and
addresses were secured, and who
are located in nearly every state
of the union with the middle
western states predominating,
literature descriptive of the Cen
tral Oregon country, and particu
larly of the military road grant
lands that form a narrow belt
across the entire state in an east
erly and westerly direction, will
be sent at once.
Stock Men Meet at
Boise and Talk Shop
The executive officers of the
Oregon Cattle & Horse Raisers
Association met in Boise last
week and explained to the rais
ers of Idaho the objects of the
organization and as a result it is
likely the scope of its activities
will be enlarged. The Capital
says of the meeting in part:
For the benefit of Idaho cattle
and horse raisers present, Mr.
Correal, tbe secretary, told of the
work being done by Gerry Snow,
brand inspector of the associa
tion, and located at the Portland
stock yards, whose duty it is to
inspect the brands of all cattle
and horses arriving and if the
shippers cannot show bills of
sale or that they are in legiti
mate possession of the animals,
possession is taken by the inspec
tor, the animal is sold on the
market and the money goes to
the executive board of the asso
ciation and the ownership of the
animal established and the money
turned over to the owner. It
was reported that the brand in
spector had saved the association
members a goodly sum of money
since taking the position.
The next annual session of the
association is to be held at Prine
ville at which time a new name
for the association is to be chos
en. I'auin of Stomach Trouble.
Sedentary habits, lack of out
door exercise, insufficient masti
cation of food constipation, a tor
pid liver, worry and anxiety.
overeating, partaking of food and
drink not suited to your age and
occupation. Correct your habits
and take Chamberlain's Tablets
and you will soon be well again.
For sale by all Iteajers.
Special Hosiery Offer
Uuamntred Ww Kin lln-n r For
Man and Women
Lrdlct' Special Offer
I oi Limited TtaM Only
Six pair ol our llni'vl :i. value IiuIivh'
guaranteed liove in Mark, tan v.r wkiite
oolora with written guimnHn, K.rSI ml
and 10c (or oohn, elv-
si'txtii OKr'KK r"K MKN
I oi a limit'"! Hum only, all uatn of
our Uiuwt Sftc value (Guaranteed lloaeany
ruloi with written guarantee and a ir
of our well known Men' I'aradiae (Gar
ter for one dollar, aud 10c veuU for
poatage, etc.
Yon know tlieac lione ; tlmy ntoodtlm
teal when all otliera failed, limy give
real foot comfui t. They have no aaiua
to iip They nuver Ihtouio looae and
baggy in the ahape la knit In, not puna
od lu. They are Guaranteed, lor tlne
neaa, for atyle. for lupuriorUy of mater
ial aud wurkiu.auahli, ahaolutaly itain-Ii-hm
a.nd to wear aU month without
I.oIm or a now pair free.
Don't delay end in your order before
offer expire. (Jive rorrect aite.
KVKKWKAK HOSIERY COMPANY
Dayton, Ohio
PROGRAM AT EXPERI
MENT FARM SUNDAY
Visitors' Day at Demonstration Station.
Prof. Scudder and Possibly French
of O. A. C. to Make Addresses and
Inspection of Crops. Large Crowd
Should Greet The Agriculturists
There is a disposition upon the
part of the citizens of this city
not to allow anything to conflict
with the big Visitor's Day pro
gram to be held at the Experi
ment Station tomorrow after
noon, therefore there will be no
baseball game as had been con
templated by the boys. It is a
matter of regret that Prof. Het-
zcl, director of the extension
work, cannot be present as it had
been arranged. Prof. Hetzel
writes that he is threatened with
a nervous breakdown and his
physician will not permit his tak
ing any active work at this par
ticular time. He was to have
delivered the oration in Burns
today but had to cancel this also.
Prof. Scudder of the O. A. C.
will be present and will address j
the people as will also others. It '
is to be a gathering to listen and '
observe, a trip over the farm is a
part of the program and The
Times-Herald feels confident that
nope will regret the trip who go
and see what has been done on
the demonstration farm. It will
be a matter of education not only
to the farmer but everv individ
ual there, as we are all interest
ed in agriculture.
In view of the weather condi
tions that have prevailed during
the growing season this vear the
crops on the Station farm will be
a revelation to manv who have
not been out. The work accom
plished by this station has done
much for the advancement of
agriculture in Harney county and
it is yet in its infancy so far as
the real benefits are concerned.
That it means the success of pro
fitable farming in this big coun
try all admit. The fanner no
longer needs to be in doubt as to
his future in the line of agricul
ture as this experiment station is
where things are tried out and
the man who follows the advice
and watches the success or fail
ure of the various crops there is
THE FRENCH HOTEL
DAVID NEWMAN, Prop.
Strictly First
Service, Fine
Commercial
Sample Room li Connection, Reasonable Rates
BLUE MT.
Daily line, Burns
8CHEDULE:
LEAVE ARRIVE
llurna bam Canyon City 6:30 p m
Canyon City. 7am Prairie City 10 a m
I'rairie City 2:30 p in
Canyon City 7 pm Burn 12 noon
Fare, Burns-Prairie City, - - $ 6.00
Round Trip, . - - 11.00
Express Rates 2 1-2 Cents, Prairie to Burns
PLEASANT, SCENIC ROUTE ALL THE WA Y
L. WOLDENBERC.IProp.
llll
THE
WELCOME PHARMACY
la The Place to Trade!
-WHY-
First: Promptness, accuracy and fau dealing.
Secend: We carry a well assorted stock of Drugs, Chemi
cals and Druggist Sundries. .
Third: We guarantee every article we sell to be just as
represented or your money refunded.
If you are a customer of ours you know this. If not, be
come one and be convinced.
J. C. Welcome. Jr.
going to make a success on his
own land.
This meeting is preliminary, or
rather just an extra, and has
been arranged merely to help
the farmer who can come and
see and listen. Prof. Scudder is
to be here on other business in
connection with the work and it
is also possible H. T. French,
leader of the field work of the
Extension service will also be
present. This is not the "Round
up" suggested heretofore but is
a meeting that will bring results
and help to stimulate interest in
the big all day meeting that is
planned for the latter part of this
month or the first of next.
The Times-Herald hopes to see
not only every farmer who can
possibly come there tomorrow,
but also hopes to see every auto
mobile in Burns out there with a
load of town people who should
see what is being done. Every
one is sure of a welcome and
they will be given an opportunity
to go over the farm.
A Good Investment.
W. D. Magli. a well known
merchant of Whitemound, Wis.,
bought a stock of Chamberlain's
medicine so as to be able to sup
ply them to his customers. After
receiving them he was himself
taken sick and says that one
small bottle of Chamberlain's
Colic, Cholera and Diarrhoea
Remedy was worth more to him
than the cost of his entire stock
of these medicines. For sale by
all dealers.
E. H. Brent, the John Day
piano man, who came over Mon
day, bringing Dr. Carl over, re
ports that the races at John Day
were going fine.
Dr. Geo. G. Carl is prepared
for special attention to all dis
eases of eye, ear and nose. Eyes,
tested and glasses fatted. 50tf .
Class. Splendid
Accomodations.
Headquarters
STAGE CO.
and Prairie City

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