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The Athena press. (Athena, Umatilla County, Or.) 18??-1942, July 28, 1893, Image 1

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OUR JOB DEPARTMENT
THE ATHENA PRESS
Ism receipt of a lint NEW
PRESS of the latest improved
pattern, and other machinery
also modern faces of Job Type.
We GUARANTEE our work.
Is the LEADING PAPER of
the "East End" of Umatilla
county, in the very heart of
great wheat belt; is read by
everybody. Subscribe for it.
VOLUME 6.
ATHENA, UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON, JULY 28 1893.
NUMBER 36
fa"", t'"1 "MS - - - i- '
ATHENA
The SlalU.
Mail closes for Pendleton, Portland, and all
polhls east, except the Dakota, Minnesota
nd Wtswnsin, t5:SfO p. m.
For Walla Walla, Spokane and Xorth Pact
flc points at 7:15.
Mail alves from Pendleton, Portland and
the east 7:45 a.m.
From ntalla Walla, Spokane and North Pa
cific point at 8:15 p. ni.
OlHoe hours General delivery open from 8
. m. to 8 p. m. Sundays, 8 to H a. m. Money
order window open from 9 a ni. to 4 p. m.
Geo, Hansell, Postmaster.
LODGK DIRECTORY
A P. & A. M. NO. 80 MEETS THE
. First and Third Saturday Evenings
of each month. ViBitinj? bretheren cor
dially invited to visit the lodge.
10. 0. F. NO. 73, MEETS EVERY
, Friday night. Visiting Odd Fellow
in good standing always welcome.
AO. U. W. NO. 104, MEETS THE
Second and Fourth Saturdays of
each month. L. A. Githens,
Recorder.
PYTHIAN, NO. 29, MEETS EVERY
Thursday Night.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
p S, SHARP, . . ..
Physician and Surgeon.
Calls promptly answered. Offlec on Third
Street, Athena, Oregon.
TjR. CARLISLE,
" PHYSICIAN & SURGEON.
Calls promptly attended to day or night.
"Office : Main Street, Athena, Or.
. jy&'J- N. RICHARDSON, .
OPERATIVE PROSTHETIC IF.XT1ST.
A.THENA,
OREGON.
E.
DE PEAT.
IAWYEB,
Practices m all courts of the state of Oregon.
Athena, Oregon.
H.
II. HILL,
J : WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER,
I t Fifteen years experience in nil kinds of
WutCh nmkinfr nnn I'pnnli'Inir. Kntlefnnf Inn
jimranreeu.
Next to M. Finneran & Co.'s Athena, Or.
i''-, ' :
r T A, MOFFITT.
1lkVfilrflki aniI Haawn-AAn
";;r,1jlSiiSES OF WOMEN A SPECIALTY.
"" ' OfflcoVith Dr. Sharp, 3rd Street, Athena.
-Slcc)s in office.
GEO. E. BATES,
I r,rTTT a rrn f. ttttt tt?t
GENERAL JOBBER.
Estimates furnished on all kinds of wood
work. Howler hpfls and eook honsnR hnilt, on
-' hort notice. Prices reasonable. Box 40,
Athpnu. Orpo-on.
PROF. J. S. HENRY, .
INSTRUCTOR
-OS-
PIANO AND ORGAN-
Will be In Athena on Thursday's and Wed
nesdavs of eacn week hereafter. Leave cider
With F. Rozensweig, at C. W. Hollis' Athena.
J. F. FORD, Evangelist.
Of Ies Jlolncs, Iowa, writes under date of
March 23, 18H3:
S. B. Med. Mfg.. Co.,
Dufur, Oregon.
Gentlemen:
On arring home last week, I found
all well and anxiously awaiting.
Our little girl, eight and one-half
years old, who had. wasted away to
39 pounds, is now well, strong-and
"vigorous, and well fleshed up. S.
"B. Cough Cure has done its work
well. Both of the children lise
it. Your S. B. Cough Cure has
cured and kept away all hoarsness
from me. So give it to every one,
with greetings for all all. Wish
ing you prosperity, we are
Yours, Mr.& Mrs. J. F. Ford.
., If you wish to feel fresh and cheerful, and
eartv -lor the Spring's work, cleanse your
system with the Headache and Liver Cure,
by taking tnou ihree doses each week.
.. SO cents per bottle by all druggists.
Hold under a posittve guarantee by the
Pioneer Drug store.
ST. NICHOLS : : :
: SHAVING PARLORS,
NEXT TO HOTEL.
First-Class Work Guaranteed.
Laities Shampooing C. L. REEVES,
ANrnvmity. Proprietor.
TUB C J BAEEETT CO.
! i II
rar4.
DEALERS IN
SHELF and HEAVY HARDWARE.
FARM IMPLEMENTS, THRESHERS,
fiaMOWERS, RAKES, IIARROWS, sss
GANG PLOWS, MACHINE REPAIRS.
Main Street, - - - - - Athena, Oregon
MILLER -THE EUSTEER
THE
LEADING FURNITURE DEALER
CALLS SPECIAL
Lira of Waif Paper
I am the onlyjdealer in Athena that buys direct
from the manufacturer, and that manufacturer,, Wm.
Campbell, of New York, is independent of the Nation
al wall Paper Combination. I buy my paper to the
best advantage to myself and I sell to the best ad
vantage of my customers, I have the largest line of
wall paper in the county and it ranges, in price all
the way from 15c double roll, to 65c for the best gilt
paper made. A fine line of undertaxing goods con
stantly on hand, and I am prepared to do embalming.
S
ii.
STORE ON MAIN STREET, ATHENA,, ORE.
Chas. H.
IMPORTERS OF
HARDWARE, IRON, STEEL,
VFIRi5(:irachiN!LRt..
FRONT, FIRST AND VINE STS., PORTLAND, OR.
DUUuLlL MOWERS
To the many superior point that
. characterized the old reliable
Buckeye
Mowers have n added many
featnrea including a power balance for
lifting the cutter bar. ete.
DODD'S K2 2 STEEL HEflDER
Myiis eld principles aid sew Imsiovemsnts, especially adapted to Oreacn, Wasninzton anil Mano.
HAND '& SELF- fWk ' ' " FULL CIRCLE'
DUMP HORSE ftr': ALL STEEL
ii i v nmro "nK"
si
HAY LOADERS
ADRIANCE REAR DISCHARGE BINDER
The lightest, best balanced, most economical Binder made.
BUCKEYE STEEL FRAME BINDER.
SCHUTTLER FARM & MARKET WAGONS,
)
4V-
XAfo r
an, , .MHI
SCNO FOR 1893
J. H. CLARK,
ft
.4,M,M if wiif" V
i s P!"v
ATTENTION TO HIS
ItlLLEE
Dodd 4 Co
liCW'-TS
t , 40
HAY PRESSES
HAY TEDDERS
lUmm STAR TRACTION ENGINE.
THE NEW STAR VIBRATOR
An Entirely Mew Machine built on near
and aueeeiiful principle!.
FINE CARRIAGES, PHAETOSS.
TCP BUGGIES. CARTS. ETC..
FARMERS CARRIAGE
KOUimiS AND FINE ROAD WAGONS.
CATALOGUE FREE,
Mng'r, Athena, Or.
PURCHASES SILVER.
Director Preston's Action Up
held hy Carlisle.
SAME POLICY WILL BE PURSUED
A. 0. U. W. Grand Lodge Adjourns
V . Sorry That She Spoke.
. Washington, July 22. Secre
tary Carlisle this morning author
ized the Associated rresa to state
that he fully approves the policy
pursued in his absence by Acting
Mint Director Prestorun purchas-ing-iilver,
but that the same policy
will govern silver purchases in the
immediate future. This state
ment will set at rest the, rumors
that the secretary would on his re
turn reverse the policy, of the
treasury in purchasing silver.
Preston was intrusted by Secre
tary Carlisle with entire discretion
in purchasing silver when he left
on his vacation. This morning,
with the approval of Secretary
Carlisle, he refused to purchase
100,000 ounces.of silver at 70 cents,
the London price being about 69.
This lot was part of a lot offered
yesterdav at 73, and was declined,
and a counter offer was made of
71$," which the holder refused to
accept. . This morning he offered
the stated 100,000 ounces at 70
cents, but Preston told the offerer
he only purchased silver on silver
days Mondays, Wednesdays and
Fridays. The total silver pur
chased so far this month is about
1,800,000 ounces, besides some
local purchases which may bring
the total up to 2,000,000 ounces.
It is not expected that the total of
4,500,000 ounces will be purchased
this month, but this is not worry
ing the treasury officials, as Secre
tary Carlisle holds, with Preston,
that the law does not require the
treasury to, purchase that amount
in case it is not offered within the
market price, .
Grand Lodge Adjourns.
The 15th annual meeting of the
grand lodge of Oregon came to a
cloee Friday evening in the A. 0.
U. ,W. temple. The installation
of officers was the special work of
yesterday aiternoon, after the vari
ous committee reports had" been
read. "'K . .'
The installation ceremonies were
conducted by Past Grand Master
D. Solis Cohen, assisted by Past
Grand Masters T. A. Stephens and
G.'E. Nottage. The special com
mittee appointed ' for the purpose
of presenting suitable resolutions
and preparing a testimonial to the
retiring grand master presented a
6et of resolutions expressive of the
high esteem in which he is held by
his brother members. John J.
Daly made a presentation speech,
and Mr. Hawthorne was tendered
an elegant silver set of four pieces.
On each piece was engraved the
monogram of Mr. Hawthorne. Be
fore adjourning, the law was
amended so as to fix the term of
office of financiers and receivers at
one year in lodges meeting week-
Sorry That She Spoke.
The Roseburg Review, in speak
ing of Judge Burnett's decision in
regard to the location of the Sold
ier's Home, says:
''The injunction against the lo
cation of the Soldier's Home at
Roseburg has been made perpetual.
This was expected when the mat
ter was brought before a judge re
siding in Salem, where the ruling
passion is to 'hog' everything in
sight. But this decision does not
end the fight, it merely opens it in
good shape. Roseburg secured the
location of the home here by an
honest, ernest, effort and proposes to
leave no stone unturned to win the
suit. As soon as the supreme court
passes on the question, if the ad
verse.there will be on theinjunction,
placed on every institution of the
state outside the city limits of Sa
lem. Already funds enough have
been pledged to fight this thing to
the bitter end, and extra session of
the legislature, a constitutional con
vention, and the removal of the
state capitol may noon become an in
teresting question to consider. The
building of the branch asylum in
Eastern Oregon, of which it wag
claimed there was a great necessity,
is affected by the Salem injunction
suit; that is one reason why East
ern Oregon will stand together in
this matter.
The Dalles Chronicle beleves that
Salem has overreached herself this
time and that she has awakened a
revengeful antagonin that will
not ptop short of depriving her of
every institution within her
clutchef. .
In the years to come, when Sa
lem is a wart on the face of nature,
she may reflect upon the life and
destiny of a hog. She has sown
the seeds of her own desolulion and
only a few church bells will be left
to toll her funeral knell, boon the
empty cerridors of her capitol
building will echo only the dismal
hooting of the owl.
The Sherman Law.
Here i3 a summary of the great
ly talked of Sherman law:
Section 1 provides that the Sec
retary of the treasury shall pur
chase 4,5000,000 ounces of silver
bullion a month or as much as
may be offered at the market price,
not to exceed $1 for 371.25 grains
of pure silver and pay for the same
in treasury notes.
section 2 provides that the
treasury notes issued in payment
for silver shall be redeemed on de
mand in gold or silver coin, at the
discretion of the secretary, that
these notes be legal tender for all
public and private debts except
when otherwise stipulated . in the
contract, and may be used by a
bank as a part of its reserve.
, Section 3 provides that 2,000,000
ounces of silver bullion should be
coined into dollars every month
until July 1, 1991 and after that
as" much as might be necessary for
the redemption of the treasury
notes.
Section 4 applies to the lo.ws re
gulating mintage to the silver
purchased as aforesaid.
Section 5 repeals the coinage
section of the Bland act.
Section 6 relates to the redemp
tion of notes issued by national
banks which are directed to be re
deemed from the general cash in
the treasury.
Section 7 declares when the act
should go into effect.
Section 2 also declared it to bo
the established policy of the Uni
ted States to maintain a parity be
ween gold and silver.
DRAGGED BY THE TRAIN.
Revolting Suicide of a Prisoner in Ne
vada. From the Reno, sevndn Gazette.
' "The overland , train recently
picked up two persons at Palli
sade, a convict for the state prison
in charge of Deputy Sheriff Allar,
There were several passengers in
the smoking-car, and at the Hum
boldt House Dan Staples got on,
going to Lovelocks. He has
charge of some cattle feeding there,
and had his leather riata with
him,, which he threw down near the
door when he entered the car. Al
most every one seemed to be ac:
quainted with every one else, and
during a general ' conversation
among trainmen, newsboys,.' pas
sengers and all, the prisoner asked
permission to step out on' the plat
form. ,
As the train was flying along at
a rapid rate nothing was thought
of it and but little attention was
paid to his movements. As he
passed through the car he picked
up Staple's ropes and stepping out
on the platform, tied one end to
the rail, slipped the noose over his
head and threw himself off. A boy
who saw him fall says he bounced
like a ball; when the slack in the
fifty-foot rope tvas taken up it
jerked him along like a blown-wp
bladder, only touching the giound
at long intervals and then flying
again into the air, raising a- dust
and leaving more or less of his
clothing every time. Some ladies
in the rear car, saw the bundle
bounding along near the platform
of their car and .when they finally
discovered that it was a living man
they were so horrified at the spec
tacle presented that it was" some
time before they gave the alarm.
The train was rolling down
Ornea hill at full Hpeed, and the
effect of dragging a poor wretch
over the ground by a leather rope
fastened , around his neck can bo
better imagined than described.
The dust and dirt was soon tinged
with red, and the mass began to
assume a darker shade as the
blood came through, the stained
and collected soil enveloping the
now thorou'gly demoralized
body. The terrible strain, com
bined with the severe beating soon
began to tell, and there was a
lengthening and drawing out visi
ble. The whole frame was limp
as a rag, and it looked as if every
bone was broken. The train was
finally stopped and the battered
and bruised body which by this
time had . become unrecegnizable
and almost torn from the head,
was gathered up and taken on the
platform. The cruel rope had cut
the flesh and could not be worked
loose for a time."
' Two men are reported travel
ing through the country up the
valley selling life' memberships in
an aheged mercantile concern,
which ' guarantees to the mem
bers price on all goods from ten to
fifty per cent, or more below the
ruling prices in the places where
they do thfir trading. The mem
bership fee is 10. and "it is report
that quite a number of farmers
have been victimized.
RIGHT TO BOYCOTT.
Decision Bearing Upon Capi
tal and Labor Alike. ;
THE LIMIT OF LABOR UNIONS
A Proposed Shut Down Burned His
Houses What Does it Mean.
St. Paul, Minn., July 20 The
supreme court of the state handed
down today an important decision,
whicii has a wide bearing on labor
and capital alike. The Northwest
ern Lumbermen's Association has
a rule providing that no member
shall sell goods at any place at
prices lower than the retail deal
ers. The Bohn Manufacturing
Company, one of its members, was
accused of violating the rule and
was notified by Secretary Hollis,
that a circular of warning of the
fact would be sent to all members.
Bohn secured an injunction re
straining the secretary on the
ground that such a boycott would
seriously injure his business. The
lower court's order was today re
versed by the supreme court on
the ground tha t the Bohn company,
being a member of the association,
should have conformed to its rules.
The supreme court holds anyone,
unless under contract obligations,
or unless his employment charges
him with some public duty, has
the right to refute to work - for or
deal with any man or class of men
he sees fit, and this right, which
one man may exercise singly, any
number of men may exercise joint
ly. In the opinion, which is very
lengthy, Judge Mitchell reviews
the history of the caso and says
it presents one phase of the sub
ject which is likely to be one of the
most important and difficult which
will confront the courts during the
next quarter of a century. He
adds: ' " " . ' .
"This is an age of associations
and labor unions. . Confined to
their proper limits they are not
only lawful but laudable! Carried
beyond these limits they are liable
to become dangerous agencies for
wrong and oppression. Beyond
what limits these combinations
cannot go without interfering with
legal right of others, is the prob
lem which the courts will doubtless
bo frequently called to pass up
on." : ,
. PROPOSED SHUT DOWN'
It Will Throw About 8,000 People
Out of Employment.
New Yohk, July 19. A special
to the Tribune from Boston says:
The directors of the Amoskeag
Mills at Manchester, N. II , today
decided to shut down the entire
during. August. This throws 8,
000 people out of employment and
takes out of circulation in this
city $50,000 in wages. The Man
chester mills have not followed
suit; but it is not known how long
it will be before they will. The
Amory corporation are understood
to be better off, their being good
demand for their goods. In an
interview Mr. Straw and directors
of the Amoskeag company stated
that the congestion of the market
was the reason for the shut down.
The Amoskeag corporation is the
largest single cotton manufactur
ing concern in the world and its
proposed action has produced the
utmost depression in Manchester,
as it furnishes in a large measure
the financial life for this city of
50,000. Its pay roll amounts to
$2,400,000, per annum.
A FEMALECRUSOE."
A Story of the Lost Woman of San
Nicolas.
The recent earthquake and elec
trical disturbances at San Nicolas
island, near Santa Barbara, has re
vived interest in the sturv of the
old Indian woman who led a Cru
soe life on the island for many
years and who waa finally removed
to Santa Barbara only to die from
the effects of unaccustomed civiliza
tion. The following sketch of this
female Crusoe is from "Santa Bar
bara and Around There" by Ed
ward Roberts:
On the smallest island was en
acted the tragedy of the "Lost
Woman of San Nicolas," which at
San4a Barbara is a familiar tale.
The story begins with the removal
of a number of Indians from Sun
Nicolas in 1830. Juft as they
were embarking one of the women
discovered that her child had been
left behind. Returning for it, she
was abandoned by her companions,
who were obliged by a coining
storm to set sail for the mainland.
It was intended to return oon as
the weather permitted, but years
passed away and the woman in
time was forgotten and left to her
fate. :
: Twenty ' years later a hunter
named George Nidever of Santa
Barbara, visited the island for ot
ters, j While there he determined
to look for the woman. After
careful search he found three huts
made of whale-ribs and brush, and
from where they stood extended
an open plain in the center of
which Nidever saw the object of
his journey. The woman's dress
was made of skins and feathers, and
her hair hung in tanged masses
from' her bare head. When dis
covered, she was cutting blubber
from a seal which she had killed,
but on seeing her visitor she re
ceived him with every manifesta
tion of delight, and readily ac
companied him to his boat. Signs
were made for her to enter it, and
on . her doing so, Nidever sailed
for the bay, and brought his charge
to San Barbara .
Her arrival there created great
excitement and hundreds called at
Nidever's house to see her. Al
though she could not have been
more than 50 years old, she was
gray-haired and emaciated. Her
expression was one of the blank
ignorance and her skin was dry
and wrinkled: . Her langauge,
strange as it may seem, consider
ing the comparatively short time
she had been lost, was unintelligi
ble to all, Those who considered
themselves master of every Indian
tongue could not understand a
word that she said. Owing to this
fact the story of her own hermit
age was never known. What be
came of the child she returned
from the boat to find on that fatal
day in 1836 is a matter of pure
conjecture. How long it lived and.
where it was buried were tacts
that iiould not be discovered. The
woman appeared to have lost all
human instincts, and to every
questiod asked made no answer
that could be understood. In three
months after her rescue she died
and was buried by the Mission
fathers. .,
IT IS A BIG COUNTRY.
A Writer Gives an Idea of the Size of
, ., ' Alaska.
A correspondent writing to a
Seattle paper, has this to say about
the great size of Alaska and the
vast natural resources of that ex
pansive domain:
Did j'ou ever stop to think ot
the.sizo of Alaska? It is nine
times as large as all the New Eng- .
land states put together; three times
the size of California, or ..twice the
Bize of Texas. It stretches more
than 1000 miles from north to soul h
and has a coast line of nearly 20,
000 miles. We bought this coun
try from Russia in 1867 and got a
bargain that ought to satisfy any
human being; for, although wo
paid j a lump sum of $7,000,000,
that ; amount only represented
about one-half a cent an acre'. It
has an average of one inhabitant
for ever 18 square miles, so one
is not likely to be jostled about
much.
As. for fishing well, you can
havij all you want and more. The
varieties of trout , a re not to be
catalogued, and the deep-sea fish
ing -ii superb. . Talk about salmon I
Don't spin any yarns about sal
mon j fishing , before an Alaskan.
There is the red salmon, which
averages from six to ten pounds;
the lxumpback salmon, which can
outj ump any other fish in - the
world, even the Norway fish,
which have been known to jump
16 feet in the face of falls and
thought nothing about it. Then
there is the silver salmon, which
will take your fly before it touches
the water and argue with you. for
half an hour before it surrenders;
and last, the king salmon, who is
the chief of his race. You are
likely to hook one weighing sixty
pounds. If you are exceptionally
lucky, you may fasten to a fellow
who will turn the scales nt eighty
pounds, and if you are an expert
fisherman, who knows just how to
"drop a line," you may get hold of a
monster weighing 100 pounds. It
makes the mouth water to think of .
suchj a thing, and then, besides,
you wouldn't have to lie about tho
size when you got hpme. '
Burned His Own Houses. "
Wi A. Smeltzer, a farmer near
Silverton, lost his dwelling anil
barn by fire July 11. He gave out
the statement that at tho time ho
was awav in the mountains, and
returning later found nothing but ,
ashes. lie had insurance of $800
on the buildings in the Plmmix
Hartford Company. ; Today W. II.
Bagely, the adjuster, went to the
place to inquire into the particu
lars and fix the loss. The result
was that Smeltzer made .a con
fession that he bnrued the build
ings. llegave himself up, and
was brought to Salem by a", con
stable. Complaint was entered
in the justice court, and he waived
examination and was bound over
in $800 bail, which he failed ' to
produce. He is said to own con
siderable property in the Kat and
has a family there. ; '
The PjiKrfS gives tho ne;s.
1J
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