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Hot Springs weekly star. (Hot Springs, S.D.) 1892-1917, September 01, 1905, Image 5

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96090259/1905-09-01/ed-1/seq-5/

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HOT SPKINKS POST FFH E
Office Hours.
8
b.
m. to 8 p.m.
B. fc mail closes nt 4:15 p. m.
and northern C. & N. W. mail dot
es at. p. m.
MONEY OKl)i:U BUSINESS:
a. ni. to :oil p. ni.
M'XU.VY OirifirK HOC LIS:
!i Jn id n. rn.
C\ A N. \\. mail
Kebr:ska.
C):IRRS
at 7 p,
•1 A. STANLEY, P. J'.
TRAVTd.tiilK' GUIDE
S Tims
Tabla.
list Springs, S. D.
SOOLN,
•LINO
"OMAHA,
CHICAGO.
D.'NFKK,
ilKLKWA,
liUTTR,
PORTLAND,'
SAl.'i' fiAKK CITY,
SAN FKANC1SCO,
:«nl all points west.
ST. JOSEPH,
KANSAS CITY,
ST. LOL'IS. mid a!l
points east ami south
TKAIKS LK.VVE AS FoLr.ows:
No. 214. I'assr nv-or, daily. Cnstor.
Hill City. Deudwood. Loan City and
Spearllsh leaves, Mop. mM arrives, J0:»5
p. ni.
No. 212. Passei!|rcr. daily. Edjremont
and all points fvist. v/nst and south
leaves, cno p. ni., arrives, »»p.
dining and reclining: chair cars
on all through trains. Tickets
sold and bapgage checked to all points in
United States ami run idn
For information reirardin rales,timetables
etc..call on or write *V. L. Kjkhv in, agent, or l.
«, W.Wakelry trereri:! passenger neront,Omaha
The
North
we stern
LINE
ONLY DOUBLE TRACK
RAILROAD.
between Missouri Iliver ar.ri Chicago.
Direct line to St. ]\ml-Minncapoiis
Direct line to Dlack Hills.
Apply to nearest, agent for ratt-s,
maps and time o.u.ls.
The Only Double Track
Railway Between Chica
go and ths Missouri
River.
Muri: Ilu.I.S
PAS8!:N«T5U,
eHVfts Hot Spring 7::t0 a.
rrlvep
14
10:35 p.
OHICAOO EXI'IIEBB.
beaves Hot Spvinjr? ^*0np. tn.
-Arrives
11
An absolute apeclf le and antlseptlc prep
aration for all kind* of
SOKE THROAT.
SIMPLY A GAEGLE. PERFECTLY HAEMLESS.
A «ura cure for Hoarseness, Tonsllltla, Qulnfjr,
Inflamed, Ulcerated and Catarrhal Sore Throat,
A preventive of Croup, Whooping Coogii mad
Diphtheria.
PDKirriNG HEALING SOOTHING
endorsed by the Most Eminent Throat Bp
ists in tbe country.
Ihonld be kept in ererj borne. Price SB
B»rc Medicine Co., Uea Moinee, Im
E. HARGENS, AGT.
Our Monthly Publication
will keep you posted on our
work and methods. Mailed
Free to the
ADVERTISING MAN
of any responsible house.
JL&ffmv
HOT SPRINGS.
Of this charming all-the-year-rouni
resort Rand-McNally's Official Bail
road Guide has the following notice
throughout the year:
Hot Springs* county seat of Pall
River county, So. Dak.—In the Black
Hill district, about 90 miles south_ of
Deadwood. Population, 1,423 during
summer season population averages
:W0.
Railroads,—Chicago & North-
Western Burlington Route,
same depot. Business Interests—
varied. Surrounded by a fertile farm
ing and grazing region, which is large
ly devoted to sheep and cattle raising.
Has productive gold and silver mines
near by. Hot Springs is rapidly grow
ing in importance as a health and
pleasure resort. Has beautiful moun
tain scenery on all sides, with every
facility for bathing and out-of-door
sports its elevation, 3,450 above tide
water, and proximity to extensive pine
forests, preserves a remarkably dry
and equable climate and the excellent
quality of the thermal waters of its
eight springs, have gained for it much
favor from tourists and persons afflict
ed with rheumatism, asthma, hay fev
er, nervous prostration, gout, disorders
of the stomach, kidneys, liver and skin,
chronic and venereal diseases. Fall
River, Cheyenne Falls, Wind Cave and
other features of interest in the vicini
ty. Leading newspaper, "STAK."
Hot Springs Has
Three tanks.
Six churches.
Electric lights.
Two railroads.
Two newspapers.
Fine bath houses.
Telephone system.
Charming scenery.
Black Hill-. College.
State Soldiers' Howe.
An altitude of 3,110 foot.
Medicinal warm springs.
Fine waterworks system.
Finest hotels in the west.
^yiLSON & WILSON,
!MK) a. in,
Freight leaves at 12:3u p.m.
14
nrriwe .„t o.aup.tii.
C. F. Sagk, Local Agent.
G.G. DENNIS, General Agent
Chicago & North-Westcrn Railway.
DEADWOOD, D.
GAB-SOL
25 CENTS
158 ADAMS ST.CHICAC&
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
Office in the.Evans Annex, second flooi
Hot Springs, South Dakota.
C. S. EASTMAN. \v. B.DL'DLKY
City Attorney
EASTMAN & DUDLEY.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Odico in Hot Sprint's National Hank Ruild
iiiK.
Hot Springs, S. Dak.
E
LMEKli. JUCKETT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Houses to rent, taxes paid for non-residents.
Office in Minnekahta Block.
Hot Springs, South Dakota
J^OOMIS s. CULL,
W ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Hot Springs, South Dakota
nrEn
GROWERS
RANCHMEN
SHIP YOUR
PELTS
WOOL
HIDES
FLEECE
DRV
G. 8.
McMILL
FUR & WOOL
I A^O fcl&'&fh
r-V. -.•
VERY TOP RRJCES
WRITE FOR CIRCULARS
ELECTIO
K||
Two elegant, plunge baths.
Numerous secret societies.
A finely equipped Sisters' Hospital.
Beautiful stuie public school build
ing.
A National Park just on outskirts of
city.
The best all-year-round climate to
be found.
Cypsum mills and inexhaustible
quarries of gypsum.
The finest stock region in the world
surrounding the city.
Finest stone blocks of any town of
its size in the United States.
Nationrl Sanitarium for Old Soldiers
(located by Congress in 1902.)
Population o'f about 2,000 and is the
county seat of Fall River county.
Wonderful Wind Cave 12 miles diS'
tant.—Owned by the Government.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
J~JR. W\ V. BECK.
GRADUATE DENTIST.
Crown*and llridge Work a Specialty.
All Work Guaranteed.
Hot Springs, South Dakota
THE WAR CORRESPONDENT.
He MiiNt Have Sol«lior'« Courage
anil DIploiiiat'N T«d.
In reporting a war the first and most
Important question naturally arises
over the selection of correspondents.
The number of men qualilied by nature
nnd education for such a task is very
limited. Your war correspondent must
be physically capable of withstanding
the hardships of the field. lie must
bo also as courageous as any soldier.
Indeed, his lot is an even harder one,
because lie must put himself in places
of tin? greatest danger without the pa
triotic fervor, the touch of a com
rade's elbow or the possession of a
rille, all of which are large factors in
making up a trooper's bravery. He
must be capable of describing what he
sees accurately and graphically, lie
must have as large a perspective as
the commanding general if he seeks
to tell the whole story of the battle.
But he may have all of these primal
requisites and still prove a failure. He
must be temperamentally a diplomat
and capable of ingratiating himself
into the sympathetic and helpful
friendship of those with whom he
comes in contact. lie may bo an ideal
representative at the headquarters of
an American general, but wholly in
capable of serving satisfactorily with
the Russians or the Japanese. As an
illustration, all of our men on the Rus
sian side speak either Russian or
French. If they did not they would
be useless. At least three of them
ire long time personal friends of Gen
eral Kuropatkin.
Above all, the war correspondent
must possess in marked degree that
familiarity with events and affairs
which will command the confidence of
those in power about iiiai. His in
fluence often extends beyond his pri
mary mission of reporting and strays
into the field of international diplo
macy. For instance, during the lioxer
rebellion in China one of the Associ
ated Press correspondents was sought
out and consulted by the commander
of one power represented in the allied
expedition as to his proper attitude to
ward the military representative of an
other power whose actions were caus
ing grave concern in that delicate
hour.—Melville E. Stone in Century.
Ilnv r^ver,
The season of hay fever is upon us,
when the most superstitious of our
friends will grow tired of invoking a
blessing every time we sneeze. The
custom, supposed to date from the
time when Prometheus invoked a bless
ing upon the figure of clay that came
to life with a sneeze. Is condemned by
St. Chrysostom and other early Chris
tian writers. Still, the victim to hay
fever may console himself for the lack
of a blessing by the philosophy of the
old English rhyme:
Snooze on Mondnv, snooze for (limber
Snooze on Tuesday, kiss a stranger
Snooze on 'Wednesday, net a letter
Snooze on Thursday, something better
Sneeze on Friday, sneeze for sorrow
Saturday, see your true love tomorrow.
—London Chronicle.
A I'arisiitii Story.
A Paris youth named Armand Gaily
killed his sweetheart and attempted to
commit suicide. At his trial counsel
for the defense described the youth
as a poet and read a pathetic verse
which he said he had written. The
jury was touched and acquitted the
prisoner. Now Viscount de Borrelli
has written to the papers: "Here is an
exceedingly humorous business. One
Armand Gaily kills a woman and tries
to kill himself, but of ecurso fails, as
they always do. At the trial counsel
reads, as being the work of his client,
a poem by himself, published some
three years ago in the Gaulois, and of
course the jury acquits him. It ap
pears to me that I deserve to be con
gratulated in this matter."
Victor Hugo's Hoiiae*
The French literary hero worshipers
are a serious lot. A proposal to place
a bust of Victor Hugo in the court
yard of the last house he occupied In
Paris before going into exile in 18S1
brings to light a couple of curious
facts. The house stands in the Rue
la Tour d'Auvergue and is in much
the same condition as when Hugo lived
there. The concierge who let Hugo
into his rooms is still concierge at
uiuety-three, and the tenant who suc
ceeded Hugo has never left. He is M.
Robin, vice president of the Society
For the Aid of Shipwrecked Seamen,
lie is eighty-six. Hero worship seems
to be preservative.
Foreign Circus Performer*
Although the circus is an institution
peculiarly and typically American,
over 00 per cent of the circus perform
ers and specialists are foreigners. Mr.
Bailey calls attention to this in his
prospectus, stating that in Europe the
struggle for existence is so sharp that
people will attempt things in which
failure means death and which no
American would think of undertaking
in order to lit themselves for the tra
peze er the'ring of some American cir
cus, where they are certain of a good
salary.-—E. S. Hallock in Century.
raKMiiiiii'H Violin.
Koeian, the Bohemian violinist, wus
the other day permitted to dr.aw a bow
across Paganini's Guarnerius violin,'
which for sixty-five years has been
resting in a glass case in a Genoa mu
seum. Ilerr Ivoelan pi
ay oil one of
Bach's airs and also a concerto of
Pagarrini. The audience was greatly
impressed. -The violin was then re
placed in the glass box and again
sealed in the' presence of tbe specta
tors.
PLAYS AND PLAYERS.
New York is to have still another
theater.
Novell), the Italian actor, is suing
Llebler & Co. for alleged breach of
contract.
It is stated that $10,000,000 was
spent for tickets at New York theaters
Vist season.
The New Amsterdam aerial theater
and gardens are proving a popular
summer evening resort iu New York.
David Helasco is to have two new
stars next season. He is encroaching
more and more into the trust's terri
tory.
Nance O'Neil has met with success
on her Australian tour. Her last expe
rience in New York must have been a
severe disappointment for her.
A. IT. Woods has arranged to star
Elfio Fay in a musical comedy to be
entitled "The Belle of Avenue A." Miss
Fay's season will begin at Atlantic
City, N. J.
Miss Edna May, who went abroad at
the close of her American season, is
new in l'aris securing gowns for her
forthcoming appearance in New York
In "The Catch of the Season."
Rose Coglilan is to star next season
In "The Duke of Killicrankie," with
which John Drew closed his last sea
son at Shamokln, Pa. She will be un
der the management of A. L. Shep
pard.
FOREIGN FACTS.
Ilorse racing in Italy is dead since
the introduction of automobile speed
contests.
Electrical machinery has taken the
place of that driven by steam in sev
eral of the principal mineral oil works
in Scotland.
The first cherries in the Paris market
this year appeared on March 31. There
were thirty-eight of thorn, and they
were sold for iflo.GO.
Known to have killed over ItOfl tier
sons. a man eating tigress at Kadarina,
in Burma, lias at last been killed by
two English engineers.
The Belgian parliament has passed a
bill ordering seats to be placed at the
disposal of shopgirls when they are
disengaged during business hours.
During the recent terrific storm at
Constantinople part of one of the
northern minarets of the famous
mosque of St. Sophia was blown down.
Cardinal Riclielmy has started a
movement to raise funds to erect a
monument to Columbus near St. Pe
ter's, Koine, to commemorate the forr
hundred and fortieth anniversary of
the discoverer's death.
EDITORIAL FLINGS.
"The financial cancer is moving
west," says a Chicago paper. Yes,
there are thirteen bankers in the Ohio
penitentiary.—Washington Post.
Mrs. Chadwick is no doubt wonder
ing how her little attack of hysterical
finance came to be noted amid the
general frenzy.—Washington Star.
The conquest of peace may be made
on the fields of Mars, but it is the jaw
bone of the diplomat that arranges the
thrifty details-Philadelphia Ledger.
Russian terrorists assure General
Trepoff that he is perfectly safe from
attacks in the streets that they will
shortly kill him in bed. The intensely
cheerful part of this is that It is prob
ably true.—Philadelphia North Amer
ican.
The strange thing about the times in
which we live is that our churches
and Sunday schools have made phe
nomenal progress during the same
years that our phenomenal growth in
dishonesty has been made.—Los An
goles Times.
MODES OF THE MOMENT.
Footing makes a cheap trimming for
a white dress, but a very attractive
one.
Lightweight wash flannels have polka
dots of color or white embroidered at
regular intervals over the cloth.
Many of the finest lawn and muslin
gowns are trimmed with rutlles of fine
brussels net, and this trimming is rec
ommended for its delicacy and airy
effect.
The smartest glove this summer is
undoubtedly the elbow length white
suede inousquetaire. Silk gloves, espe
cially those with lace tops, are almost
as fashionable.
The buttoned in the back lingerie
waist cauy.es much woe by coining un
fastened at inconvenient times. The
bright woman learns to cut off the
small pearl buttons as sooa as the
waist comes from the shop and to sub
stitute the more expensive but reliable
embroidered or crocheted buttons.—
iSew York Post.
SALT WATER HINTS.
Do not sit around in a wet bathing
suit.
After dressing a brisk walk is excel
lent to restore the circulation.
The first bath of the season should
not be longer than fifteen minutes.
Never take a sea bath directly after
eating. Wait at least an hour, prefer
ably an hour and a half.
Never remain in the water longer
than thirty minutes, or the benefit of
the bath will he lost and the risk of ill
ness be incurred.—Philadelphia Ledger.
SISTERLY CITIES.
Philadelphia should persist in Its ef
fort to become respectable. It will
find the experience agreeable as soon
as It gets used to it.—Chicago News.
Chicago and New York continue to
talk about how big they are, while
the rest of the country is talking, about
how bad they are.—Washington Star.
HOT SPRINGS!
The Great Health Resort of the
Black Hills reached via The
in broad daylight. Take the line that arrives at
Hot Springs in the day time when you can see
where you are going. Trains arrive at Hot ik
Springs at 9:00 A. .Da L^'j
J. A N E O E N N IS 1
A. G. F. & P. A., Gen. Agent, pb
Omaha, Neb. Deadwooci, S. D. ft
THE STAR DOES FINEST JOB PRINT'C
Harvest Time.
Mr. Merchant, do you re
alize that right now the
harvest-time is at hand
for yon? Careful buyers
are already looking about
preparatory to laying in
their supply of dry goods
for the fall and winter.
Other buyers are plan
ning to take advantage of
the "close of the season"
bargain and clearing sales
to purchase their supply
for next summer. What
are you doing to make
them look your way?
The farmer doesn't wait
for the grain to gather it
self: he goes after it with
every appliance at hand.
Will you wait for your
harvest to come to you or
are you going after it?
The Best
Harvester
For this Crop
THE STAR..
Is an Ad in
HPS

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