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Hot Springs weekly star. (Hot Springs, S.D.) 1892-1917, September 01, 1905, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96090259/1905-09-01/ed-1/seq-7/

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CLEMEftTIIMA GONZALES,
OF CENTRAL AMERICA,
RESTORED TO HEALTH.
PERUNA THE REMEDY
Miss Clementina Gonzales. Hotel Pro.
riueia, Guatemala. O. A., in a recent
letter from 2-17 Cleveland Ave., Chicago.
111., writes:
"I took Pertiha for a worn-out con
dition. I was so run down that I could
not sleep at night, had no appetite and
felt tired In the morning.
tried many tonics, but Peruna
was the only thing which helped me in
the least. After I had taken but a half
bottle I felt much better. I continued
Its use for three weeks and I was com«
pletely restored to health, and waft
able to take up my studies which had
been forced to drop. There is nothing
better than Peruna to build up th~
system."—Clementina Gonzales.
Address The Fernna Medicine Co.,
of Columbus, Ohio, for instructive free
literature on catarrh.
BED111!*
PFF/TM
PLEASANT
THE NEXT MORNING I FEEL BRIGHT AND NEW
AND MY COMPLEXION IS BETTER.
My doctor says it acts gently on the atwnRch. liver
•nd ktduojB and is a pleafcttnt laxative. This drink is
made from herbs, noa is prepared for 096 as easily as
tea. It is called l^anc'ii Tea" or
LANE'S FAMILY MEDICINE
All drug*iete or by mail 25 rt». and 60 eta. Buy it to
Lane'pi Family .IZerticine moves the
DOW6IM each day. In order to be healthy this is
necessarj. Address, O. F. Woodward, Le Roy, N.Y.
O & E A IS
u«e tho Great English Remedy
BLAIR'S PILLS
Safe, Sure, Effective. 50c. & SI.
DRUGQIST8Lorj3ji nry St., Brooklyn, N» Y.
A Pagan Memorial Day.
In ancient Rome one of the most
Important public festivals was the
Parentalia. This was held in honor
of deceased relatives and lasted from
February 13 to 21. It was a public
holiday the temples were closed, mar
riages were prohibited and the magis
trates appeared in public without wear
ing their tokens of office. The last
day of the observance was called the
Feralia, and was a season of universal
interest. Other festivals in honor of
the dead were held on August 24, Octo
ber 5 and November 8, when souls
were supposed to rise. On these oc
casions the graves were decked with
roses, violets and other flowers.
BABY CAME NEAR DYING
From an Awful Skin Humour—
Scratched Till Blood Ran—Wasted to
a Skeleton—Speedily Cored by Cutl
cura.
"When three months old my boy
broke out with an itching, watery rash
all over his body, and he would scratch
till the blood ran. We tried nearly
everything, but he grew worse, wast
ing to a skeleton, and we feared he
would die. He slept only when in our
arms. The first application of Cuticura
soothed him so that he slept in his
cradle for the first time in many weeks.
You don't know how glad I was. One
set of the Cuticura Remedies made a
complete and permanent cure. (Signed)
Mrs. M. C. Maitland, Jasper, Ontario,
Plan of Action.
Amateur Writer—My friends say
this story of mine will prove a great
success and they have promised to
buy it when it comes out in book form.
Editor—IIow many friends told you
that?
Amateur Writer—Oh, a dozen,
or
more. Sj
Hdi'tor—Go and' 'make a hundred
thousand more such friends, get their
written agreements to buy the book,
then come back and I'll talk business
•with you.—Success,
CASTOR IA
For Infanti and Children.
The Kind You Have Always Bought
Bears the
Signature of
RAIN INJURES WHEAT.
OoTernment Report Sajrs ExccwiTa
Moisture Docs Katnase.
The weekly summary of crop con
ditions. issued by the National Weath
er Bureau, is as follows: I
During the week central and western
Texas experienced unusual heat, while
unseasonably cool weatlier prevailed
in New England and the northern por
tion of the Middle Atlantic States
elsewhere the temperature was favor
able. The rainfall was excessive and
injurious in the Dakotas and Minne-
The previously reported excellent
interrupted during the fore part of the "jt is
Roosevelt expressed
regret, praised Mr.
Conger unstintedly
tioned. but it is rather definitely known
that Mr. Loomis will not be appointed.
His resignation as assistant Secretary of
my
week, the fields being too wet for tho maladies and much of the fatalities
reapers. Local storms in North Da- among hogs is due to carelessness on
kota and northeastern South Dakota the part of the owner by which the
caused the lodging of considerable hog is compelled to take into his sys
grain. Satisfactory yields are gener- tem large quantities of filth in his
ally indicated over the southern por- drinking water. I know where there
tion. Complaints of shrunken grain are wallowing places it is indeed a
are general from Washington and problem to prevent this, because if
western Oregon. there is one thing which a hog delight*
Much complaint of blight and rot in in more than another it is to b: the
potatoes is received from the lake re- himself in mud and then try to dry it
gion and the northern part of the mid- oft' In the drinking trough, and he gen
die Atlantic States, but the reports
from the Missouri and central Missis
sippi valleys are more favorable.
CONGER QUITS FOR NEW JOB.
cons»lerable
a II an
railroad, owned by
the American and. .ed/S«
State may be expected at any time. It some have even found it a pay
is certain that he is to retire from the
FEWER BABIES BEING BORN.
Census Bulletin Shows Steady Decline
in Births Since 1SGO.
There has been a persistent decline of
the birth rate in the United States since
1S60, according to a bulletin issued by
the census bureau. The bulletin was pre
pared by Prof. Walter F. Wilcox of Cor
nell university. I
The bulletin shows that at the be
ginning of the nineteenth century the
children under 10 years of age consti
tuted one-third and at the end less than
on«-fourth of the total population. The
decrease in this proportion began as
early as the decade 1810 to 1820, and
continued uninterruptedly, though at
varying rates, in each successive decade.
Between 1850 and 1860 the proportion
of children to women between 15 and 49
other States, also, there was no de
crease. In only six
Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky
and Indiana—did the proportion decrease
in each of the five decades.
In 1900, for the United States as a
whole, the proportion of children was
only two-thirds as great in cities as in
the country districts. In the north At
lantic division, however, it was almost
as great in the cities as in the country.
In the southern division it is hardly
more than half as large in the cities as in
the country, while in the far west the
difference is intermediate in amount.
A comparison is made between the
proportion of children bom of native
mothers and the proportion of children
born of foreign born mothers. In 1900
the
former proportion was 462, the latter
T10, the difference indicating the great
er fecundity of foreign born women.
There has been uniformly a larger
proportion of negro children than of
white children. That difference more
than doubled between 1800 and 1880,
but in 1900 it was less than half what
It was In 1880 and less than at any other
census except in 1860.
it pays
to advertise
lnS
State Department. Whether he will re- ting. Such disking will often prevent
ceive an appointment in the diplomatic the encroachment of weeds. In the
service is not known. Eastern States alfalfa fields sometimes
suffer a check in their growth, tend to
1
years, the child bearing age, increased,
but since I860 it has decreased constant
ly. In 1860 the number of children un
der 5 years of age to 1,000 women
was 634 in 1900 it was only 474.
Considered sectionally it is found that
in the north and west there has been a
more or less regular decline, while in
the south the change has been less regu
lar and the decline less marked. In
1900 the smallest proportion of children
was in the District of Columbia. The
next smallest proportion was Massachu
setts. The largest proportion was in
North Dakota and Indian Territory.
In the general decrease between 1S00
and 1900 not single State of the north
Atlantic division took part.
la this papw.
m,
Clean Water for HORB.
sota, and also in parts of the lake ve- hog is one of the problems. It is diffi
gion, South Atlantic, and Central Gulf
States, and in Florida. Rain is badly
needed over the greater part of Texas,
in portions of Kansas, generally
throughout the central and southern
Rocky Mountain districts, and in Ore
gon. Frosts, causing slight damage,
occurred in Montana and Idaho.
How to provide clean water for the
cult to devise any means by which
water can be kept before the swine
at all times and yet be so arranged
that the hogs will not wallow in it. It
appears, however, as though a valu
able suggestion looking to the solution
of this point has been made in a late
issue of the Iowa Homestead by a
Kansas farmer who suggests a plan
condition of corn continues generally from which the accompanying cut has
throughout the principal corn produc
ing States and also in the Atlantic
Coast and Eastern Gulf districts.
Wind storms blew down considerable
corn In Nebraska, Missouri, Arkansas,
and Ohio. In some counties in Ivan*
sas and generally throughout Texas
the crop is in need of rain.
The harvesting, stacking and thrash
ing of spring wheat on lowlands in tlio
northern part of the spring wheat re» been made. Writing to our contem
gion, where grain is fully ripe, were
WATEIt TUOI UII FOR HOGS.
pornry this nian says.
opinion that many of the
orally succeeds quite well. Anil a
bunch of them can usually put three
or four inches of mud in the bottom of
a trough in a single week. I enclose
jou a drawing illustrating the plan
that I have used for some time in try
ing to keep my troughs clean. The
trough in this case is made out of two
planks, one 2x8 and the other 2x6. a
piece of eight-inch plank 15 Inches long
nailed on each end. To this in turn
two other planks are nailed, thus fur
nishing an agency for scraping off
I
Ambassador to Mexico Mny Take Rail*
road Position in China.
Edwin H. Conger, ambassador to
Mexico, has resigned his post. He plead
ed private business and personal reasons
or his act. President
mud from the hogs while
—and accepted the they are drinking. I then nail on an
resignation. upright, as is indicated in the illustra
It is understood tion, mortised out so that a plank mw
that Mr. Conger is be raised or lowered directly above the
to go to China in center of the trough, the* height de
connection with ths
pen(nng upoa tile size of the hogg that
have access to the trough. I acknowl-
l-hat
IUMSTEB CONGER. China Development troughs of this kind, but where
Company, a concern
one
^as
a
controlled by J. P. Morgan. I that he can save the price of his mate
It has not been determined who will rial and labor almost every day."
succeed Mr. Conger as ambassador to
Mexico. Probably it will be David E. Doesn't Pay to Coddle Alfalfa.
Thompson of Nebraska, now American If an alfalfa field is in bud condi
nmbassador to Brazil, who desires tho tion it is usually best to plow up and
Mexico post. re-seed. It scarcely ever pays, at least
he name of I-rancis B. Loomis, as- where irrigation is practiced, to cod
sistant Secretary of State, has been men- ,ii„
Jittle labor to
'J'K bunch of hogs I believe
n,f
P°'*
Stalld
?rmvers
sPrinS,
Man*
commend diking every
e\en 'when the stand is good.
practice to disk after each cut-
turn yellow and otherwise show a sick
ly
condition. Oftentimes this condi
tion is accompanied by an attack of
alfalfa rust or spot disease. The best
remedy for such a condition is to mow
the field. The vigorous growth thus
induced may overcome the diseased
cbndition.
Way to Pnll Posts.
S. W. Leonard says in Farm and
Ranch: "I will give a plan for pulling
up old fence posts. Take a chain and
put it around post close to the ground.
TEXAS POST-PULLER.
Take a piece of plank, say 2 feet long,
2 inches thick and 8 inches wide set
bottom end about 1 foot from post let
chain come up over plank and lean
In seven plank toward post. Fasten single-tree
I to end of chain and when horses pull
States Illinois. ^jle p0St •win come straight up."
The Squab Fad.
The inflated boom for squab rais
ing has nearly passed off, and yet the
legitimate squab plants continue in
business. It is with this branch of
the poultry Industry just exactly as
it is with other branches, the egg busi
ness, the duck industry, the Bel
gian hare, etc. Every little while
there is a big stir made about one of
these enterprises, creuting quite a
fever for a time. This gradually sub
sides, and that particular business set
tles down to its proper basis, and many
who keep on in their usual way,
raising 6quabs, pullets for laying,
ducks, etc., continue to secure, not un
told wealth, but fair profits from their
operations.
Bmut Attacks Late Sown Grain.
Early sowing of cerealB when the
soil temperature is low gave in expe
riments with barley, oats and spring
wheat
lets
smut than late sowings.
similar manner, less smut will be
found on those cereals grown on a cold
clay soil than on a loamy soil, and. as
a rule, the greatest amount of disease
will be found in cereals grown on
sandy humus soils. A high tempera
ture of tho sn) during the first week
after sowing favors the germination
of the smut pores, and consequently
the infection of the cereals. Cereals
will germinate and begin their growth
at a temperature below that at which
the fungus can develop.—New Eng
land Homestead.
Corn Shock Binder.
I have seen two articles of late veil
ing how to tie corn in the shor-k. Will
give my way. which I believe to be
more rapid than either the former arti
cles teach. The accompanying cuts will
give the idea at a glance. I take a
curved stick (the end of a buggy shaft
is best) about 30 inches long. Rore a
half-inch hole 3 inches from the larger
end and put through it a piece of rope
12 inches long and tie the ends to
gether. forming a ring or loop. Into
this loop tie a piece of rope 31^ feet
Ions, or longer if very large shocks are
to lie tied. To the other end of this
rope tie a 4-inch ring made of i{-ineh
rod 11 use an old breeching ring*. This
makes the compressor complete as
shown at I-'ig. 1. In tying the shock
take the stick in your right Viand and
throw the rope and ring around the
shock. Catch ring in left hand and slip
stick through it as far as you can,
then bring stick to the right until oth
er eml passes through the ring, as
shown at Fig. 2, when the shock is
ready for tying and the compressor
can be turned loose, as it will stay in
place. This implement can be used for
a two-fold purpose. In husking corn
I use a shorter one like this for tying
stiver. T'ntie the shock and lay it
down, then as you pull the ears off
gather the stalks in your lap. have the
binder lying straight out at your side,
and when you get an armful lay the
stover across the rope, pick up the ring
in one hand and the stick in the other,
slip ring over end of stick and slip
down until entire stick has passed
through the ring the same as in tying
SIIOCKS. Tie twine around tho bundle,
which can then be reshoeked if not
ready to haul. This way takes a little
more time at first, but saves time and
CORN* SHOCK KINDER.
trouble when you come to haul, and
the stover will take less room in the
shed.—J. II. Freeman.
Goats or Sheep.
The Angora goat certainly has not
yet become very popular in New Eng
land. There are a few small flocks,
but those who have them seem less
enthusiastic than tlie.v were two or
three years ago. and their neighbors
do not seem anxious to invest in them.
In Texas and some other States of the
South and Northwest they appear to
give better satisfaction. Reports from
many sections in the Eastern States
show an increased interest in sheep
and many fine flocks can be found, es
pecially of the larger English mutton
breeds. Vermont seems to stand by
her Merinos, as she properly should,
for thej have attained a high reputa
tion and have sold at high prices, but
even in that State may be found good
flocks of Oxford, Shropshire and
Hampshire, and these seem to be ths
favorites with those who are starting
new flocks or those who have flocks
of mixed breeds that they wish to im
prove by crossing with a pure-bred
ram of a larger breed. Let the good
work go on, until New England has
as many sheep in proportion to popu
lation as were here a century ago.
Sod-Bound Fruit Trees.
Sod-bound trees are not very con."
mon, but they are to be mot with,
When a tree has made a good growtir
and has spread out its top to cover its
feet there is little danger of its be
coming sod-bound, for the branches of
the tree catch most of the sunshine
and the grass growth below is meager.
The sod-bound condition conies when
the tree is either very young or so
old
that the leaves are thin and few.
The young tree that is set in grass
ground and has never obtained a very
good hold of the ground is the one
meet likely to become sod-bound,
which means that the roots of the
grass have possession of me soil and
aie taking most of the plant food and
D.oisture.
ground.
In
Such a tree can bo relieved
c:ry by digging out the grass and giv
ing its roots the
use
The "change of life'Ms
Ihe most critical period
of a woman's existence,
and the anxiety felt by
women as it draws near
is not without reason.
Every woman who
neglects the care of her
health at this time in
vites disease and pain.
of tho
Why Strawberry Plants Die.
51 any strawberry plants die becau 4
they are kept too long after being dug
before transplanting. Some die be
cause sot too deep and the crown or
center of the plant is covered. P.ut
in a dry time more plants die from a
lack of pressure on the soil about the
root9 than from all other causes. In a
wet season they will live if left on
top of the soil with no earth to cover
the roots. Plants out of the ground
are like fish out of water. Therefore
the sooner they are in their natural
element the lower the death rate
Keeping the Soil Fertile.
Prof. Hopkins suggests: If the soil
is acid or sour, apply lime to it to
make it sweet. If the soil is pdbr in
nitrogen only, grow clover or some oth
er legume which has the power to se
cure nitrogen from the air. If the soli
is poor in phosphorus only, apply bone
meal or some other form of phos
phorus. If the soil is poor In potassi
um only, apply potassium chloride or
some other form of potassium
THE TURN OF LIFE
A Time When Women Are Susceptlblc to Many
Dread Diseases—Intelligent Women Prepare
for It. Two Relate their Experience.
I
When her system is in
a deranged condition,
or she is predisposed to
apoplexy, or congestion
of any organ, the ten
dency is at this period
likely to become active
—and with a host of ner
vous irritations, make
life a burden. At this
time, also, cancers and
tumors are more liable
to form and begin their
destructive work.
Such warning symp
toms as sense of suffo
cation, hot flashes, head
aches backaches, dread
of impending evil, timid
ity, sounds in the ears,
palpitation of the heart,
sparks before the eyes,
irregularities, constipa
tion, variable appetite,
weakness and inquie
tude, and dizziness, are
promptly heeded by in
telligent women who are
approaching the period
in life when woman's great change
may be expected.
These symptoms are all just so many
calls from nature for help. The nerves
are crying out for assistance and the
cry should be heeded in time.
Lydia E. Pinkliam's Vegetable Com
pound was prepared to meet the needs
of woman's system at this trying
period of her life. It invigorates and
strengthens the female organism and
builds up the weakened nervous system.
It has carried thousands of women
6afely through this crisis.
For special advice regarding this im
portant period women are invited to
write to Mrs. Pinlcham at Lynn. Mass.,
and it will be furnished absolutely free
of charge.
RIIEI: OOCPON NO. I
Send this coupon with your name and ad
dress and vour druggist's name, lor a fri-e
hottle of Mull's Grape Tonic, StOmidl ToalC
and Constipation Care.
Ml I.l.'S GRAVE TONIC CO..
21 Third Avenue, Itock Inland. Illlnol*
(five Full Address and Write Plainly
The Si.oo bottle contains nearly three times
tlw joc size. At drug stores.
FKEE COUPON NO. 8
Send this coupon with your name and ad
dress and your druggist's name, lor a Iree
bottle of Mull's Grape Tonic, Stomach To»lc
and Constipation Cure.
HULL'S CRAPE TONIC CO.,
SI Third Avenue, Ruck Island* IlllnoU
G-ii'.e Full Address and Write Plainly
The Ji.oo bottl# contains nearly three times
the 50c size, At drug stores.
10c.
asfcMcT
•oaaaaauBQ
Mrs.AEG.Myland
a
^oaoaaMaMaomaoMiaaeaaaoosoot*
I wrote you for advice and commenced
treatment with Lydin E. Pinkham's Vege
table Compound lis you directed, and I am
happy to say that all" those distressing symp
toms left me and I have passed safely through
the Change of Life, a well woman. I nm
recommending your mcdiciin to all my
friends.'—Mrs. AnnieE. (j. Hviand,Chester-".',
town, Md.
Another Woman's Case.
"During rhango of life words cannot ex-
flad
iress what I suffered. My phvsician said I
a cancerous condition of the womb. One
day I read some of tho testimonials if women:
who had been cured by Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound, "and I decided t.o try it
and to write yo* for advice. Your medicine
made me a well woman, and all my bad symp
toms soon disappeared.
I advise every woman at this period of life
to take your medicine and write you for ad-,
vice."—Mrs. Lizzie Hinkle, Salem, Ind.
Read what Lydia E. Pinkham's Com
pound did for Mrs. Ilvland and Mrs.
II inkle:
Dear Mrs. Pinkham:—
"I had beensuffering with falling of the
womb for Years and was passing through the
Change of Life. My womb was badly swol
len: my stomach was sore: I had tl^zy spells,
Eick headaches, and was very nervous.
lydia E* Pinkham's Vegetable Compound Succeeds Where Others Fail
What Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound did for Mrs. Hyland and
Mrs. Hinkle it will do for any woman
at this time of life.
It has conquered pain, restored
health, and prolonged life in cases that
utterly baffled physicians.
Mull'sGrapeTonic
WRITE FOR THIS FREE BOTTLE TODAY
SEE COUPONS BELOW
A POSITIVE CURE FOR
O N S I A I O N
STOMACH
AND
BOWEL TROUBLE
Until Mull's Grape Tonic came upon the Ameri
can market there was no cure for Constipation.
We believe the best way to convince you that Mull's Grape Tonic is a
positive cure is to give you a bottle and prove it. Constipation indicates that
your Bowels or intestine* are in a state of decay and death. Beware of
physics—Pills, etc., they make you worse.
If you are afflicted use these free coupons at once while the offer is open
for yourself and give one each to your friends or neighbors who need it
FREE COUPON NO. 2
Send this coupon with your name and ad
dress and your druggist's name, lor a fret
bottle of Mull's Grape Tonic, Stomsdl Tonic
and Constipation Cure.
MI LL'S CRAPE TOXIC CO.,
81 Third Avenue, Rock Inland, 11 lllioit
Give Full Address and Write Plainly
The Si.00 bottle contains nearly three times
the 50c size. At drug stores.
FREE COUPON NO. 4
Send this coupon with your name and ad
dress and vour druggist's name, for a free
bottle of Mull's Grape Tonic, StOOMdl Toftlc
and Constipation Care.
MULL'S CRAPE TONIC CO.,
CI Tklrd Avenue, Rock Inland, tlllnota
Give Full Address and Write Plainly
The Si.00 bottle contains nearly three times
the 50c size. At drug stores.
Sale Ten Million Boxes a Year.
THE FAMILY'S FAVORITE MEDIOINE
CANDY CATHARTIC
:Y
Wo RK-WH I liE:voU
BEST FOR THE BOWELS
WET WEATHER. WISDOM!
J\ry THE ORIGINAL
132
JBl-A.CKfORhYE LLOW.'
m.Kttinropi!Y
NOTMKELSE'WILL
TAKE NO SUBSTITUTE}
cArAtoaucs
FNCC
•HOWIN^F
ULL LINK OT GARMENTS AND HATS.
A. 1. TOWCR CO., BOSTON, MASS., U.S.A.
TOWEH CANADIAN CO.. ITP.. TORONTO, CANADA.
ftENSIOIj IwaSlni^n^B.c!
Draabta
FOR WOMEN
troubled with ills peculiar to
tbeir sex, used AS a douche it marvelously «ac
cessfal. Thoroughly cleanses, kills disease eerms,
stops discbArtes. heals inflammation and local
soreness.
Faxtine is in powder form to be dissolved in pure
water, and is far more cleansing, heating, germicidal
And economical than liquid antiseptics for all
TOILET AND WOMEN'S SPECIAL USES
For sale at druggists, 50 cents a box.
Trial Box Md Book of Instructions Pres.
TMS R. PAKTON COMPANY BOSTON. MASS.
a c. N. u.
is
•MM.
MIT MM*
No. 35—1905
In time.
80

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