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Hot Springs weekly star. (Hot Springs, S.D.) 1892-1917, March 06, 1908, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96090259/1908-03-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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BLACK HILLS.
BLACK HILLS ACADEMY
Price Agreed Upon College Property—But
Not Much Time Given to Collect
the Cash.
it Will be of Great Benefit to Hot Springs
Bringing Many Students
and Families.
The eastern owners of the Black
Hills college property and the Dakota
Wesleyan University have practically
gotten together on the price of the
property, but not as muoh time has
yet been granted for making the pay
ment as was expected. As it now looks
the whole amount must be raised by
July 1st. This means some great
hustling in Hot Springs as well as
through western Dakota. Rev. Dr.
Hunt, the .field agent for Dakota
Wesleyan, has been in Hot Springs for
several days getting matters in Bhape
to begin active work with Supt. Dolli
ver. They will make Hot Springs their
headquarters.
The pledge from Hot Springs is 87000
a good portion of which has already
been subscribed, but there are a
number of citizens not yet called upon
who will be given an opportunity to
show what they think of getting such
an institution here. Every resident
will certainly be benefitted by secur
ing such an educational institution
here—backed 07 an already strong
university. It will be far different
from the trials of the old college. The
county isN older, young people have
grown up and want the advantage of
higher education. Before there were
but few young people in all this western
country. Now the woods and the
prairies are full of them, aud they are
all seeking an education. This academy
will attract students not only from
South Dakota, but from Wyoming and
Nebraska. Our climate and health
resort advantages will appeal to many.
A brief account of the Mitchell
University, which is assuming charge
of.b^-JB!3ok Hills Academy, will be
an* show' some of the
Ifrplace derives:
Wesleyan University,
Mitchell, and whose
^ave charge of the
Hills Acad-
managed and
*ns of its kind
1 manage
directors
selected
dwood,
ssFalls,
^Ver-
That it is now in a most vigorous
condition is shown by the fact that in
the past two years the president's house
has been built at a coBt of 312,000.00
indebtedness of about @20,000.00 pro
vided for and an endowment of
$100,000.00 raised.
The institution now has property
valued at $250,000.00 practically free
from debt and an interest bearing en
dowment of $100,000.00.
Centuary Memorial Hall recently
completed at a cost of $100,000.00 pro
vides a splendid home for a hundred
young ladies and furnishes table board
for all students and teachers who'wish
to board there.
The financial gain to a town where
is located a good school may be seen
by the following figures:
The total expenditure of the Uni
versity last year, exclusive of the
boarding hall, was $15,000.00
The number of persons connected
with the school, faculty, student body
and employees all told, number, seven
hundred ten. Including the summer
school an average of forty weeks is put
in in school life.
Board at 82.50 per week for 710
persons makes a weekly board bill of
$1775.00 and for 40 weeks $71,000.
Boom rent for 710 persons at $1.50 per
week makes a rent bill of $1065 per
week, and for 40 weeks amounts to
$42,600.
A conservative estimate of other ex
penditures for items such as laundry,
clothing, stationery, photographs,
dentist, optician, physician, etc., etc.,
would place the figure at not less than
$100.00 for each of the 710 persons,
which would add $71,000.00 more.
Put into more compact form it would
read:
University expense. $45000»00
Board bill for 710 persons... 71000 00
Room rent 42600 00
Expenditures for clothing
etc., etc., 8100 each 71000 00
Making a total of $229600 00
All of which passes through the
various business bouses of the town
annually.
No account is here taken of the
numerous famili'is who move to a
school town to make their permanent
homes, in order that they may live in
atmosphere of school life, with its
Matures, entertainments, commence
1, etc., etc.
above statements throw some
the reason that Mitchell has
.pi population during the past
While we may not expect
ifeool at Hot Springs for
it is reasonable to ex
^•y or more students dur
a rapid inorease
benefits derived
as great,
foment of the
sari river we
A
Published at The Only. Carlsbad of America*
HOT SPRINGS, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, MARCH 6.
more young folks this academy
have a muoh larger number.
This will beat any factory that could
find an opening here.
Not only does a college or academy
help a town financially, as indicated
by the foregoing, but it is of untold
value in asocial way—an uplift and an
attraction to any oommunity. A strong
faoulty of upright, educated people,
together with a lot of young, energetic
and ambitious students, doing some
thing constantly for entertainment,
for athletics and for education, will
boost for a town. Every citizen of Hot
Springs who has young people growing
up or who is interested in the progress
and well being of Hot Springs should
get to boosting for the academy. Let
everybody become a booster and talk
for anything and everything that will
help the town, then the knockers will
go into hiding.
After we get this aoademy Hot
Springs proposes to continue the boost
ing habit and go after the Odd Fellows
Home—and get it. Let everybody
boost. Our town must grow or die—
and it will not do the latter. It is
improving every day, but it should go
ahead faster, and it will with proper
enoouragement.
Visiting Hot Springs Lodge.
George Warren, grand ohanoellor of
theK. of P. lodge of South Dakota,
left yesterday morning for Hot Springs,
where he will visit the lodge and con
fer with the members relative to the
coming meeting of the grand lodge,
which will oonvene at the Black Hills
health resort June 7 and 8.
Mr. Warren but recently returned
from the east side of the state, where
he visited several of the largest lodges
of the order, and he predicts that from
point of attendance the coming grand
lodge meeting will be the largest in the
history of the order in this state. Now
that the opportunity has been afforded
to reach the Hills with comfort and
ease, hundreds of people are anxious
to visit this portion of their state, whio
heretofore has been as a closed book
to them, and learn for themselves just
what we have. The rate will be with
in the reach of all and at least one
speoial train on each the Milwaukee
and Northwestern roads are ex
pected.
Mr. Warren says the Lead lodge ex
pects to send a hundred representa
tives to the grand lodge meeting to
help entertain the eastern visitors.—
Deadwood Pioneer Times.
Dr. Jennings Returns to Hot Springs.
Dr. Jennings, who has been located
in this city for the past six months
with an office over the S wander grocery
has decided to retire from the practice
here and will return to Hot Springs.
Some weeks ago Dr. Jennings made a
trip to the coast and if his present
plans materialize he expects to be
looated in Seattle in the spring.—
Rapid City Journal.
Woodmen Card Party.
Oome to the Woodmen card party a|
Odd Fellow Hall Monday evening
March 9th. A fine time is assured.
Supper 25 cents.
a
large
.iei
.the
J. G. HUMLEL,
C. A. RICHARDS,
J. W. JOYCE,
Committee.
Electric Motor for Sale.
The STAR has a 2 horse power, direct
current, electric motor for sale at a
great bargain. Write the STAR. Hot
Springs, S. Dak.
The Episcopal Churclt
Dean Sparling, of Rapid City, will
conduct services in St. Luke's church
every seoond and fourth Sunday in
the month until furtherjjarrangements
are made. Excellent Lay-services are
maintained the alternate Sundays.
Sunday school at 10 o'clock- Morning
prayer and sermon at 11 a. Singing
by a vested choir. Citizens and
strangers are cordially'invited.
MMW®
PASS LIBRARY TAX RESOLUTIONS.
City Council Passes Resolution Pro
viding for Submission of Library Levy.
At its regular meeting Monday night
the city oounoil by a vote of six yeas
and one nay voted to submit to the
voters at the city election next month
the question as to whether a levy of
one and one-half mills shall be made
on every dollar of the assessed valua
tion of the city for the maintainance
of the public library.
A similar resolution was unanimously
tabled a month ago but on its passage
Monday night Alderman Riordan was
the only one who voted against it. A
large amount of interviewing and argu
ment by the ladies of the Civic League
and others has been done with the
various aldermen with the above result.
Now it is for the people to decide. If
the resolution oarries at the spring
election, the tax will produoe about
$750 if it is all paid in but it is believed
it will produoe at least $500, which will
keep the library running as it is now
very nicely done by private subscrip
tion, sales and entertainments.
The council further discussed the
street lighting question and hope to
make arrangements for them befere
long.
Theyalso arranged for purchasing
$100 worth of treeB, which they will
further beautify the city with, and also
arranged for some necessary and com
mendable improvements at the
park.
The administration is nearing the
end of the year and the people are
beginning to* wonder if Mayor Hargens
will not be a oandidate, and if not who
will make an acceptable successor.
Many improvements were made
about town during the past year and
there are many more to be made. Dr.
Hargens understands what there is to
do—he is ardently in favor of looking*
after the peoples interests—and- there
is a disposition by many to continue
him as mayor for another term.
Library Sale.
Connor & Co. will give a two day's
sale on Friday and Saturday March
6th and 7th for the benefit of the pub
lic library.
On these two days 10 per cent of the
cash sales will be given to the library
fund. Remember the dates.
COUNTRY SCHOOL REPORTS.
CONGER SCHOOL.
Report of the Conger school, Dis
trict No. 12 for month ending Feb. 28,
1908:
No. pupils enrolled 5
No. days taught 20
Total No. days attendance 97
Total No. days absence 3
No. tardy marks 0
Those not absent nor tardy: Anna
Anderson and Peter Conger.
ELIZABETH REYNOLDS, Teacher.
Short Order Lunch Counter.
Is kept by Joe Chow, where you can
get a fine lunch at any time. Opposite
Gillespie Hotel.
ADDITIONAL LOCAL NEWS.
Rev. E. S. Chappel's many friends
will be glad to know that he is out of
danger from his recent attack of pneu
monia and is resting oomfortably at
Dr. Traer's Sanitarium where he has
received so much help.
Ed. Jones announces himself this
week as oandidate for the office of
States Attorney-for whioh he is well
qualified. He is serving his second
term as county judge and has had sev
eral years experience in the practice
of law in Iowa before coming here in
1900.
Judge Cleveland announces himself
as a oandidate for county judge. His
long years of experience at the bar
have well fitted him for the office.
PRESIDENTS COTTEGE—Blaok Hills Academy,
'''I"'
-f.
'REVSOt-VBD
THAT THE MARCH WIND
BLOW
THE
iPKorarol
'Mvntat »uvr»* ut«Nco
Total $247, 03.22
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA I
County of Fall Klver
WINTER A WAV
AW 1*1 AK E\ IT. Kf E &S
5ARV
TO GET REAfcf -FOR .SPRING
ARE" VOU'REAOV Is"
SPRING?
Otyjisp-/
evrsi'
Buster BRowtf
THE MARCH WIND-S ARE CHILLY Do Yol/ NOT
WIJH TO KEEP OFF THE CHILL AND PUT THE
APPEARANCE ON? -SOME PEOPLE .SAY THAT
THING-S ARE NOT AS THEY -SEEM. Do Vol/
BELIEVE THAT A MAN WHO HA«S'NT A -SWELL
-SPTING OVER-COAT GET-S ALONG A.S WELL AS
A MAN WHO HA«St YOU WEAR YOl/R OVER
COAT ON TOP. WE CAN GIVE YOl/ A TIP TOP
OVERCOAT FOR $7\50, $10.00 AND $15.00.
dl/ST TO CLO.SE THEM
Ol/T.
ONLY A FEW LEFT. £•.*
RESPECTFULLY,
G. W. Montgomery.
REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF
THE BANK OF HOT SPRINGS
OF HOT SPRINGS, S. D.
•:I: AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS, DEC. 3, 1907F
MADE TO THE PUBLIC EXAMINER
RESOURCES 'is
Loans and Discounts... (133.255-16
Overdrafts s0.j:
Cash and Exchange 94,567.75
88
5uS?I ,v financial condition of the Bank of Hot Springe at the close of business Dec., 3
1907 to the best of my knowledge and belief.
..
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 7th day of Dec., 1907. •tf&S
ELMER R. JUCKEtfr, Notary Public.
A PREM1UH
The ruling of the Postoffice Depart
ment requiring newspapers to con
duct their subscription accounts
upon practically a cash basis forces
the STAR as well as all newspapers
to comply. We desire to I get the
delinquents to pay up quickly and
as an inducement have] made ar
rangements whereby we can offer
the Northwestern Agriculturalist as
a premium—free to all whQ payjn
advance for the Star for a year.
This will be only for a limited [num
ber and a limited time. It must] be
done at once. You get the finest
agricultural paper published twice
a month at Minneapolis for nothing.
Subscribers are required by the post
al laws to be cut off of the list any
way if they become delinquent [for ia
years, and now why not acquire the
cash in advance habit and get -this
benefit. We will apply this to all
cash in advance subscriptions since
Jan 1,1908, but subscribers can ^hot
get this benefit together with other
reduced publications—for they! all
cost us extra money. „,
IT.-F.-.'^BR *V"
ffc V*
yOL. 22. NO. 46.
OUD CLOTHK
OONT »0
TV
,XoME AND LOOK,
Total $ 247,903.33
Cashier.do aolomnly swear that the foregoing is a true and oorrect state
G. C. SMITH, Cashier, .r
1/
N!Pe'f
LIABILITIES:
Capital Stock... 10,000.00
Surplus.... 2,000.00
idivid
Undivided Profits, net 4V
Deposits 231, 59
T:
v"7j
X-y,
13':
"N..
•$*

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