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Hot Springs weekly star. (Hot Springs, S.D.) 1892-1917, August 20, 1915, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96090259/1915-08-20/ed-1/seq-4/

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Dr. L. E. EATON,
DENTIST
Located in Minnekahta Blook :,
Saooenor to DB* J. A. GRAHAM
Hot Springs South Dakota
Elmer R. Juokett B. B. Adams
JUCKETT & ADAMS
Attorneys-afc-Law
Will praotioe In all Courts
Post offloa Blook Phone No. 8
Hot Springs, South Dakota.
Oharlea S. Eastman William B, Dudley
•, EASTMAN & DUDLEY
Attorneys-at-Law
Praotioe in all ooarte. Oi&oe over the
Bodega. Hot Springs, South Dakota.
BERNARD J. HAAS
Chiropractor
Offloe in the Post Offloe Building
seoond floor front rooms.
S. Dak.
RED PEPS
PHILOSOPHY
&
-s "v
ADV.
father left me
the whole world to
det out and make*
a living In Gee 1
Jin
a lucky fellow'
Now that vacation is
almost over, it is
to in of
school and the many
little things needed
to "Teach the young
idea how to shoot."
Low prices prevail
at our store on all
school supplies.
-J-
w-
,1v-
We would like your
trade and the chil
dren's trade. Chil
dren always receive
the same courteous
attention here that
is bestowed upon the
grqwivups.
Let Us Supply
Allot Your
^^A^hooijNeeds^
Dakota, as
seoond class mail matter.
abandon
Hot Springe
THOS. E. EASTMAN
Attorney-at-Law
•*'.
Will Praotioe in All Courts
Hot Springs South Dakota I
it
HOT
The Hot Springs Weeklu Star
W. A. Wimr, Publisher.
TERMS:
$1.50 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
Otherwise as Follows
OneYair.. $1.00 Six Month $i.oo
Three Months 50 cts
The STAR is published every Friday.
Short) newsy communications and local news
items are cordially solicited.
Entered at the postoffice at Hot Springs, South
SHALL WE STAND GUARDIAN?
Leaving Mexico quite out of consid
eration it still is most obvious that we
oannot maintain the Monroe dootrine
by merely talking about it. We must
aot to the letter of
thiB
dootrine or
and leave Central Amerioa
and the weak north republics of South
Amerioa to shift for themselves.
The assassination of President Guil
laume of Hayti by a mob after he had
been forcibly removed from the French
legation in whioh he has sought ref
uge, constitutes an affront to France,
whioh that oountry could not possibly
overlook were she not engaged at the
moment in a life and death struggle at
home.
Of course, Mexico particularly has
supplied the most impressive lesson of
the grave possibilities for the United
States inherent in a policy of assuming
responsibility for the conduct of af
fairs on this side of the Atlantio, for
bidding the employment of force by
Europe, and requiring Europe to look
to us for oorreotion of wrongs and in
justices, and then refusing to exert
ourselves to prevent, or ocrreot, abuses
whioh involve the rights and even the
very lives of European nationalities
living in the countries south of us.
How effeotive a rational application
of our self-imposed guardianship over
the smaller and more irresponsible
Spanish-American republics can be is
well illustrated by the suooess whioh
has attended our supervision of San
Domingan fiscal affairs, and by the
prompt flattening out of the Colum
bian campaign against Panama when
the latter for what were unquestion
ably just reasons declared her inde
pendanoe of Columbian dictation, and
the United States intervened to pre
vent bloodshed.
It is oharaoteristio of the timid men
tal prooesses of the ultra-paoiflsts that
they applaud a polioy whioh saves
Amerioa from Eureopean aggression
and at the same time seek to make that
polioy innocuous and thas invite the
aggression feared. The United States
either must be the real sponsor for and
defender of the experiment in demoo
racy whioh is in progress on
thiB
hem­
isphere, or she must drop that role and
retire within her borders and' let the
rest of North and Sooth Amerioa be re
garded as a proper field for exploita
tion, colonization and domination by
any European or Asiatic power am
bitions to extend its poseessions
Certain looallties continue to receive
the stimulus of war orders. Pitts
burg's reoent share of oontraots aggre
gates 180,000,000, virtually all for rail
way equipment. Seoretary Nordman
of the Pittsburgh Foreign Trade Com'
mission states that he has turned over
to firms in other oities several large
orders for munitions each as rifles and
cartridges, whioh are not manufac
tured in the Pittsburgh distriot. A
925,000,000 contract for rifles, accoutre
ments and ammunition is to be let
among Denver manufacturers provided
they can handle suofa a large order..
The Newhonss mills in New .fork City
have reoelved a contract from the
Italian Government for blankets, the
msjorlty of thsm to be eight and one'
half pounds weight, 600,000 to be de
livered in October. The American
Woolen Company has also reoelved
large order for blankete from the same
government. Orders such as this ac
count largely for the high prloes of
wool. Efforts of the Allies to place
929,400,000 order for piorio aoid in St,
Loots have failed beoauee of inability
of manufacturers there to eupply sooh
demand, bat several of the St.
Loaisians are oontemplating the
establishment of a piorio acid plant in
New srsey. Piorio aoid selle at 91.50 a
pound, an advanoe of one dollar sinoe
the war.
Some praqtltloners administer strong
stimulants to their patients in the be
lief that the artificial etrength thus de
rived will enable them to tide over
orisle. It is hoped that war ordere will
aotln like manner on our national in
dustries, that they may pass through
tils oriels of a democratic adminis
tration.
"When the war ends, all European
oountrlee will be organised on a syndl
oate baels. Their industries will be
more oentrally oentrolled. They most
get no their feet as eoon as possible,
Foreign toade wili be needed more
than ev^er and it must be' teoured at
the least possible expense."
This is a statement made In the Man
ufonturere'Newe by a western m|p
who stands high
in
the boetueee world
Mr. ). Pierpont Morgan, Jr., teoentfy
returned from abroad, deolares that
the Saropean war oan not last more
than a year longer. Oonslderingtheee
twosfcatementa, whir*
will this
'gal off at" under a demoorat
'.-.,A* reput*
Will
be
flood "of
goods.
4
Mr. Rertrteld says he is going to in
vestigate the steamboat inspection ser
vice for the last fifteen years. We irnag-1
ine that the kind of steamboat inspect
ion in vogue in 1900 will be fasoinating
information for survivors of the East
land horror. The kind of inspection in
vogue on the Great Lakes in 1915 will I
be much more interesting—even
though it is embarrassing to Mr. Red
Held.
The month of July, noted, among!
other things, for marvellous ''prosper
ity," especially in "war order" lines,
managed, nevertheless, to produce a|
fruitage of 1,739 commercial failures,
with liabilities of more than
"Dry" States are reported to be
puzzled to determine what constitutes
"near-beer," May we aid them? "Near
beer" bears the same relation to the
beverage as ordinarily brewed that
Seoretary RedSeld's "prosperity" does
to the real article.
The Colonel declares that he
Mrs. LuoyP. Bryson, past depart
ment president of the Woman's Releif
Corps of South Dakota, died at the
State Home on last Thursday after a
short illness, altho she has been in
poor health for a number of years..
Her husband, Capt. James Bryson was
a member of the Home for several
years previous to his death in October
1913, Funeral services were held from
the Home chapel on Saturday and in
terment made in the Evergreen cem
etery. Having no relativee it is under
stood.that Mrs. Bryson left consider
able money to the widows at the State
Home.
Lieutenant Stewart Stanley depart
ed Sunday evening on the first lap of
his journey to Manilla, PhUlipine Is
lands, where be will be stationed at Ft,
Coregador for the next two years
Stewart has been spending the past
couple of montbe with his parents,
Major and Mrs. W. H. Stanley and
visiting numerous boyhood friends at
different points in this state and it
was with a feeling of reluotanoe that he
leaves the Hills for duty in the Orient
He goes from here to LosAngeles and
SanDiego, and later to San Franoisoo
from whioh place he sails on Septem,
ber 7th. For the past two years he has
been stationed at Ft. Caswell, North
Carolina.
Quite a number of people have
called the attention of the writer to
the deplorable condition of the Ever
green oemetery with reference to the
weeds which have been allowed to
grow thie year so that at the present
time the oemetery is one mass of weeds,
has been suggested that eome day
soon be named at whioh time every
one torn out and take one day to mow
the weeds and otherwiee improve the
appearance of the eilent oity. Many
handB make light work and the satis
faction you will have in doing this
aot will more than repay yoo for the
tlmeepent. September 1st has been
suggested for the day.
A telegram was received on the 16th
nst. by Mr. S. E. Wilson from Dr.
Elmer E. Lymet, Bay View, Michigan,
annooncing the death of his daughter,
Ethel, after a brief illness of two days.
Mies Lymet will be remembered by
many Hot Springe people who knew
ler here as a student In black Hills
College when her father, Dr. Lymet,
was vloe-preeident and later preeident
of the oollege. She graduated at Iowa
Wesley an University several years ago
of whioh sohool her father is Dean, and
has oooopied one of .the important
ohaira in that University Nlnoe her
gradoatlon. Her body was taken at
onoe to their home at Mt. Pleasant,
Iowa, for burial. Miss Lymet was a
yoong woman Of rare glfte and of the
highest attalnmente. She was greatly
beloved by all who knew her and the
many friende of the family hero ontte
in sihoere sympathy to the sorrowing
parente.
FIRST METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Bervioee every Sabbath at the ohuroh
opposite the poet offlo*.
9:30 olass meeting, 10 a. m. Sunday
rohool. 11a.m. morning sermon,
6:30 p, m. Bpworth League, 7:90 p.
evening sermon.
Weekly prayer meeting Thursday
evening --.
A oordial invitation'to atrangers and
friends to woreeiw with us,
Htobert L. Gase, pastor. Residence
nen door to ohuroh.
/KI1L1 STAR I HOT -ww
917.000,000.
This was more failures than were re
ported in July, 1914.
will
en­
roll with his party. But his party is
not rushing to enroll with him. It is
enrolling in the republican resignation.
ADDITIONAL LOCALS.
In giving directions as to how to lo
cate the Carnegie Library ia Hot
Springs a person might say truthfully
that it is looated in lower town iu the
center of the biggest patch of weeds in
the oity. A small amount of labor
would make a wonderful lot of diter
ance in the appearance of these
grounds.
}, A. Rhodes, of Chioago, was an ar
rival in the oity Monday for a short
visit with relatives and departed that
evening for points in Montana to visit
sister. He expects to return here
ater and will be accompanied on bis
return home Dy his wife and ohildren,
who have been spending the summer
here at the home of her mother, Mrs.
Leaoox.
MAKING BOMBS FOR VILLA
Former Iowa Man Employed By Mexican
General In Making Bombs
Eev. Case, of this oity, handed the
following to the Star man for publi
cation about Lester P. Barlow, of Clear
Lake, Iowa, who is employed by Gen
eral Villa in making bombs. The
young man named in the article is a
former sohool mate of Rev. Case and is
well known In northern Iowa. The
artiole is taken from the Clear Lake
Globe-Gazette.
The Barlow Bomb
Geo Barlow reoeived an ugly in
strument of war on Saturday, from his
son Lester, who is one of the principal
factors in the Villa army in Mexico.
Young Barlow is of an ingenious turn
of mind, as has been shown by
making of aeroplanes and the numer
ous flights made with the same. Two
years ago he cast hit lines with the
Villa forces and was soon placed on
the staff of the commanding offioer.
His latest activity has been in superin
tending the manufacture of an ex
plosive bomb whioh is dropped upon
the army of the opposing foroe, and it
is one of these bombs whioh was re
ceived on Saturday. In length it is
three feet, with upper half made iu
form to aot as a balancer, the same as
aft ather tip on an arrow. The lower
part is a chamber filled with explosive
material and on the extreme end is a
plunger having a button shaped tip,
whioh as the inetrument deoends,
strikes the ground, causing the ex
plosion. It has an immense foroe and
is capable of doing a vast amount of
distruotion. Mr. Barlow reoeived word
that his
Bon
hiB
was engaged in makiug
flights and droping these bombs onto
the enemy's army.
Interesting Letter
Below is given a letter reoently re
oeived by George Barlow, from his son'
Lester, who is on the Villa staff in
Mexico. Of itself it is interesting, but
doubly so as the writer is one of the
boys grown up in Clear Lake:
"El Paso, Texas, July 6, 1915
"My Dear Ones: For the first time
in three or four years I have been in
an American town for the 4th. No
comparison to the red lemonade fourth
of Clear Lake in days gone by when I
usen to celebrate the fourth on fifty
cents. This morning I sent to ycu by
express one of General Villa's aer
oplane bombs, I have thrown off this
kind from my aeroplane 6,500 feet, or
12,500 feet above the sea level our
battle distriot is 6,000 feet above the
sea. Keep thie bomb, as it is the only
type we use. I built tbem in Mexico,
500 of them. They are very deadly for
200 feet, loaded with dynamite. How
ever this one is not loaded, so do not
be afraid of it. My aeroplane is a Mar
ton Tractor, 100 horse power, epeed 90
miles per hour with four passengers,
I took a spill and sent the maohine to
the faotory. Just got it back and leave
tonight for oentral Mexico. We Bre
having lively times now. Fighting in
large armies, whioh make it very hard,
as the battles last two or three weeks
We have had several reverses, but have
got the other fellow going. We lost
some territory, due to not hav tug am
munition. We had to equip the army
with 30-30 hunting rifles, as we were
unable to get ammunition for our
Mausers. We have gone back to our
heavier guns now, as we have plenty of
ammunition. General Villa, I believe
will be baoked by the United StateB
before this thing is finished, as he is
the only leader in Mexioo who aeems
to desire to please the Washington of
floials.
General Villa is a man every inch of
him, and altho many things happen in
oor territory whioh we oannot be held
responsible for, General Villa is fight
ing for the poor of Mexioo, I have the
honor of being the only American or
foreigner on General Villa's staff and
the most trosted foreigner in the army.
When this is finished I will try to save
some money before I am too old.
have been through muoh, know my
self pretty well and keeping myeelf
straight. I will soon be thirty, and at
that time|wlll have oompleted my years
of trying to dlsoover what I am best
fitted for. December 2nd when am
30 ySars old I shall try and see yoo.
am healthy, hard as a rook, oan eat
anything when there Is anything to eat
and have no sweethearts, I wish yon
wonld not worry aboot me. A fellow
has to take ohanoes that is the gams
of life. I think this trooble will soon
end and when it does I will oome and
see yoo. General Villa said I had bet
ter write to my mother, in fact ordered
me to do so. Told me he had written
her not to worry aboot me.
Well, I am gfting back tonight. When
1 eroesed the boundry four days ago, it
was the first time In fourteen months
I will stay this time until it Is finished.
Datlt if you oould sse me with General
Villa and his. staff, you would wonder
how 1 got there. Lots of men tried
and foiled. Iam the only outelder,
and I got there by being abeolutely
square. LiosterP. Barlow,
Oars Gen. Villa Oar, Mexioo.
—Clear Lake (Iowa) Globe-Gazette.
1
WARREN R. MILLHAM -s
Monuments
Repreeentlng Gooden ft Ballard, whole
sale and retail Marble Mid Granite
dealere. Hot Springe, South Dakota.

THE "PRUDENT MAN"IS WELCOME
ME HAS HIS MONEY /Af THE BAAfff
Ilk
1
iiSW'-'v
The man who has money in the bank will get AT
TENTION when he goes to talk business.
To have money in the bank PUT it there let it
stay constantly ADD TO IT. When you get a big bal
ance, BE GAREFUL. You may, in ONE DAY, by
some bad investment, lose the savings of a life time.
We shall gladly give you our opinion on any in
vestment you are figuring on making.
Make OUR bank YOUR bank
We pay 4 per cent interest on time deposits
Peoples National Bank
If you have good land for sale cheap,
land or equities to trade, list it with me.
Have made good eastern real estate
sedations and expect fall buyers.
Call on or write to
"WHAT FOR?" YOU ASK.
For the privilege of doing business with your
local dealers, the tradesmen that you know to
be reliable, prompt in deliveries and anxious to
'please yoo.
ALSO, Remember That Your Home Paper
Is
A GROWING BANK
THE STOCKMANS BANK
THE BANK OF PERSONAL SERVICE
Desires at ail times to serve and accomodate its friends. We
solicit a share of the business from all sources. Features of
this bank ars Responsibility—Safety—Effidaocy^Servke.
Call upon us *or telephone and it will plesie us if we can be of
service to you. New friends and old—visitors and residsnts—
need never hesitate to consult us.
We have a Farm'Loan Department
-tt
'1
Z--
-f,
:r*
1
NOW
as-
lit
L. O. Shirley
Hot Springs, S. D.
HALT!
Yoia Are Wanted
lis!
Here
"K-
4/
•w
'W.
-Ms,

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