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Hot Springs weekly star. (Hot Springs, S.D.) 1892-1917, August 20, 1915, Image 6

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96090259/1915-08-20/ed-1/seq-6/

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TROOP SHIP1SOUK
ENGLISH NAVY'S PROUD TRADI
f( TION SHATTERED—FIRST
LOSS OF KIND.
NEARLY 1.000 HAVE PERISHED
Destruction of Transport Royal Ed
ward by German Torpedo Consid
ered a Serious Blow at Present
Time—Russians Continue Retreat.
Western Newspaper Union News Service
London.—The sinking in the Aegean
sea by a German submarine of the
British transport. Royal Edward with
heavy loss of life—probably 1,000—
has shattered the proud tradition of
the British navy of having transported
hundreds of thousands of men across
the sea without the destruction of one
troop-laden ship.
On two previous occasions trans
ports have been attacked. The Way
farer was torpedoed by a submarine
in the Irish sea, but the vessel was not
sunk and only five lives were lost. The
Manitou was attacked by a Turkish
torpedo boat in the Aegean sea, and,
although the ship was not damaged,
fifty-four lives were lost through the
breaking of a davit as a boat was be
ing lowered.
The loss of the Royal Edward is a
serious one at this moment. The men
It carried were not part of a new ex
pedition, but were reinforcements for
the Twenty-ninth division, which has
been on the Gallipoli peninsula since
the first landing and which received
such high praise from Gen. Ian Ham
ilton in his report of the initial and
subsequent operations.
The Royal Edward's destruction
not likely to delay operations recently
undertaken, for, with the Russian re
tirement In the east and the continu
ance of the Balkan negotiations, the
necessity for achieving something defi
nite in the assault upon the Darda
nelles is growing greater.
The retreat of the Russians from
Poland continues, and it is believed
they probably will have to fall back
farther than the Brest-Lltovsk line, as
Berlin reports today that Gen. Lits
mann has stormed and taken the forts
on the southwest front of Kovno, cap
turing 4,500 prisoners and 240 guns.
LEO FRANK HANGED.
1B
feu
Lynching Takes Place Almost in Sight
uA of Phagan Home.
Marietta, Ga.—Leo M. Prank, con
victed of the murder of Mary Phagan,
was taken from the state prison farm
at Milledgeville Monday night by a
small band of determined men, was
.brought to within a few miles of the
Phagan home In this city at daylight
Tuesday and hanged to a tree near the
Marietta-Milledgeville highway. The
body, barefooted and clad only in pris
on trousers and shirt, was found at
8:30 o'clock. It Is believed he was
lynched about.daylight. Frank's body
dangled from the tree for Beveral
hours, while a throng from the sur
rounding countryside gathered about
the scene. By a vote of the crowd
the body was cut down without mutila
tion and taken by automobile to At
lanta, where another throng congre
gated to view it.
The gang which took Frank from the
prison dormitory apparently worked
quietly and.rapidly after they began
their 100-mile automobile ride from
Milledgeville. The scene of the lynch-
ing was within a few hundred yards of
two farmhouses, occupants of which
said they noticed nothing unusual dur
ing the early morning hours. One man
who lived half a mile farther away
said he saw four automobiles passing
his house, but they did. not attract un
usual attention. 'f-il
There seemed to be evefy indication
that the hanging had been carefully
planned. The ease with which Frank
was removed from the state prison
farm, difficulties left in the way of
pursuers, and the sudden disappear
ance of the band after the lynching, all
pointed to thorough preparation-
Coast Gale 8erlous
wm
Temple, Tex.-—Two or three lives
have been lost in Houston as the re
sult of tae coast.,gale, and the damage
is estimated at $5,000,000 there. Mea
ger wireless messages tell \of serious
damage in districts fronting the sea.
Boats took people'from buildings on
mala streets to the United States
transport Buford. Many towns in
southwest Texas were hit hard, furi
ous wind reaching 200 miles north to
Waca
The greatest damage in Gal-
§5. veston, judging from the meager wire
m\ messages *ad the tales of audi
Pi as. left before the fuU fury
-,fpf the hurricane was felt on the island,
i$,4 the'districts fronting the
buildings on the water front
itiwlwe ruined, this circumstance being
,v*!most a repetition of the city's e&
perlence in ^previous storms. It will
weeks, probably,. before the full
of 016
property damage can be
I). :'0.--^ tarra&a
ifeply to thePan-American appeal
Mexico, it was learned here.
JC:
£rf{
4 .{••*•
News of the
Week Cut
Down for
Busy Readers
European War News
The Austrian fleet
haB
Six persons were killed and twenty
wounded in another air raid which the
Germans have made over England. Of
ficial announcement of the raid was
made by the government press bureau
at London.
1
The Austrian submarine U-3 has
been sunk in the lower Adriatic, ac
cording to an official announcement
made at Rome. Twelve men of the
crew were saved.
British submarines have added the
gunboat Berk-l-Satvet and a transport
to their list of Turkish warships tor
pedoed in the Dardanelles, the Sea of
Marmora and the Black sea.
The victorious Austro-German forces
continuing their advance toward Petro
grad have occupied Lukow, according
to an official announcement of the
Berlin war office. Zambrowa also has
been occupied.
The sinking of the British auxiliary
warship Ramsey by the German naval
steamship Meteor and tfce blowing up
of the latter In the North sea were
announced officially at London.
A dispatch to the London Dally
Telegraph from Athens says that the
Turkish cruiser Goeben, which was re
named the Sultan Selim after its sale
by Germany to Turkey, has been tor
pedoed by an allied submarine near
the Bosporus.
Capture of the Polish railroad town
of Siedlce, 63 miles west of Brest
Lltovsk on the main line from Warsaw
to the latter fortress, which Is the
southern base of the new Russian
lines of defenses, is announced in of
ficial German dispatches.
A German battle cruiser was de
stroyed and several other German war
ships severely damaged In a great
naval battle with the Russian fleet in
the Baltic sea near Oesel Island, at the
entrance to the Gulf of Riga, accord
ing to news dispatches received in
London from Petrograd.
Domestic
A world's mystery has developed in
the cancellation of wheat orders at
Chicago and other cities by buyers in
Italy, France and the United King
dom. On top of the cancellations La
Salle street buzzed with the rumor
that the Allen liner Corinthian, flying
the British flag, which sailed last Fri
day from Montreal for Havre, France,
has met with disaster in the Gulf of
St. Lawrence. No confirmation of thlB
could be obtained.
Minneapolis & St. Louis passenger
train struck an automobile near Ma
son City, la., killing Miss Gladys Pres
ton of Belmond, seriously injuring Carl
Gaqote of Popejay, Harold Rice and
Mrs. I* V. Sharpe.
The Chugash National forest In
Alaska was cut almost In halt by order
of President Wilson. The forest re
serve is to be crossed by the
government railroad from Stewart to
Fairbanks.
Frank Grela, self-confessed slayer of
his wife, was led to the gallows in the
state prison at Wethersfleld, Conn.,
and hanged for his crime.
Buyers are securing horses for the
French government in central Illinois,
ail order for 10,000 head having been
received at Bloomington, 111., for im
mediate shipment ..
.*•••. •...••
Several storeB and flats were de
stroyed by a fire of unknown origin in
the center of the business district of
Muncie, Indy It is estimated that the
loss will be more than $150,000.
The.$10,000 Job on "Uncle Jlmmie"
JfcDkhinwps fartnSsoea to Mary Smith.
Miss Smith, said to be an orphan liv
ing with friends at Chicago, was se
lected to go to "Uncle Jlmmle's"
farm in Illinois at $3 a week, with
the promise of $10,000 on his death.
Silas N. Eversole, sixty years of
age. a termer Dunkard preacher, and
his son, 8. Newton Eversole of Bristol.
Ind., were arrested a* suspect# in the
Hf»el. JM|eklin murder ease, which
Inrer iiaee tKumer Uss been Indiana's
hank at, Cedar Rapids,' la.,
aed tin*
rT.
,iW
bombarded
the Italian Littoral railway from Mol
fetta to Seno San Giorgio, according
to an official report issued at Vienna.
At San Spirito
the
depots were burned.
station and five
a
»i?io «i'n
ties, was
r,
It was reported at Copenhagen that
eight members of the crew of the
interned German cruiser Berlin were
shot by coast guards while swimming
ashore in an effort to escape.
K',Jre
:SV',
and
Aurora
Beadle
Bennet
Bon Homme
Brookings ..
Brown
Brule
Buffalo
Butte
Campbell
Charles Mix
Clark
Clay
Codington ...
Corson
Custer
Davison
Day
Deuel
Dewey
Douglas
Edmunds ....
Fall River ..
Faulk
Grant
Gregory
Haakon
Hamlin
Hand
Hanson
Harding
Hughes
Hutchinson
Hyde
Jackson
Jerauld
Kingsbury ...
Lake
Lawrence ...
Lincoln
Lyman
McCoo"k
McPherson ..
Marshall
Meade
Mellette
Miner
Minnehaha ..
Moody
Pennington
Perkins
Potter
Roberts
Sanborn
Spink
Stanley
Sulley
Tripp
Turner
Union
Walworth ...
Yankton
Ziebach
Todd
Pine Ridge ..
Net loss
•The net loss in
7,115.
8EED CORN SITUATION IS 8ERI*
OUS SAY8 STATE COLLEGE
AGRONOMIST.
State Institutions and from
Many Different Parts of |p
the Sunshine State.
Dakota to herself to pick and store lier
own seed corn—and to pick it early,"
says Dr. A. N. Hume, agronomist at
State college. Concerning the present
seed corn situation he says:
"At the date of this writing, it is
well along in August and it la hot in
the sun and in the shade. Old Sol 1b
apparently doing at least something to
make up for lost time, and, in fact, he
had better be about it, for he lost a
good deal In the early part of the sea
son. There is now before us but a
short time in August—and if per
chance we have no frost before the
10th of September that will still leave
us only about three weeks for com to
grow. We may have more than that
—who can tell—we may have less, but
It ^s a reasonable prediction that We
are more than two-thirds through Mt
the growing season for this year.
"A communication from one of our
neighboring states calls the situation
'serious.' One thing is sure for the
present year, the annual seed corn cru
sade shovfld not be considered an emp
ty form. We need not be downcast in
order to be forehanded. South Dako
ta must be wide-awake to the seed
corn situation. If perchance the sea
son is short, let that be an extra in
centive for picking and storing seed
corn early. If our season proves late
and all the corn ripens, pick the best
and the most mature ears for se*.d
not later than September 10th. And
If they do not all ripen before that
date, pick the best ones for seed any
how, even if they shrink a little.
"Remember the experience of older
years, pick seed corn early and cure
it in a dry place, It is a duty of South
Dakota to herself to pick and store her
own seed corn."
Flyer Circles Capitol.
Pierre.—The dome of the South Da
kota^Jhtate eapltpl was circled for the
first time by a flying machine, when
Andrea Houpert, with his monoplane,
Fort%crrc nld'n^int** 1*1!.?
Praises State Fair.
Bropkings.—"The,farmers of South
Dakota, as well as all others interest-
€. Perisho^ provident ot the Stater***
ggort
HOT SPRINGS WEEKLY STAR.
POPULATION OF SOOTH DAKOTA DECREASES
J^'erre ^°«th Dakota's population as shown by the third official census
... &,«i29
'7
'oss °f 4,3St) persons since the 1UI0 census was taken. It will
comparison given below, that Stanley county was divided
Jackson being a portion of it. The net loss for the whole of
wnat was btanley county is 7,115, and the present population of these counties
can be noted below:
1915 Census.
6,736
16,061
1,475
11,560
1 5 5 5 4
25,969
4,376"
1,485
5,894
4,888
14,790
10,670
9,206'.-
15,192
s™
3,272'
3 4 5 2
1910 Census.
6.143
15,766
96
3.1,061
14,178
25,867
6,451
1,589
4,993
5,244
14,899
10,901
8,711
14,092
2,929
4,458
11,625
14,372
7,768
18,"41
13,Til'.»
1,933
6,639
6,840
6,027
6,265
10,130
11,837
*3,532
7 7 6 7
l."5
6,400
7,654
7,763
6,716
10,303
13,061
12,318
3,307
'5,1.26
12,560
10.711
19,694
12.712
10,848
9,589
6,791
8,021
12,640
1,700
7,661
29,631
8,695
12,453
11,348
4,466
14,897
6,607
15,981
*14,975
2,462
8,323
13,840
10,676
6,488
13,135
544
2,164
6,607
579'538 583'888
the region forming Stanley county, Haakon and Jackson
with
20'929,
creaae-
Gther items of interest o^rml0S,°'
20,843 persons with common school
education 2,612 high school, 228 nor
From the Capital City, the Various mal, 832 college training, 312 college
W«^ra Newsp«per Union New. Smle* i^urnB SHOW a DODUla
!l ^1*^* ?!J0"th:
of
26'969'
an
K*"*r
is
Gain.
593
295
1,379
499
1,376
132
Loss.
*563
814
1,636
1,451
173
1,224
•3,532
292
79
593
"*776
*2,077
155
1,154
"*852
"*424
40
307
1,727
346
7,982
7,475
7,870
6,237
4,228
6,271
.... 7,286
6,316
4,821
5 0 5 5
13,095
2,685
2 0 7 7
5,275
11,914
11,865
17,710
13,564
7 0 0 1
.... 10,013
6,831
8 3 2 8
.... 8,724
3,427
8 0 0 7
37,613
8 6 6 6
... 10,040
... 7,641
3,648
1 5 2 6 1
.... 7,377
... 14,977
.... 2,251
,... 2,004
10,106
1 4 6 3 6
.... 11,436
.... 5,919
.... 14,851
.... 2,571
.... 2,403
.... 6,315
584
'774
"*622
646
coun-
Sioux Falls Has 20,929.
Sioux Falls.—The census figures for
Minnehaha county give them a total
population of 37,613, a gain of 7,982, or
26.9 per cent. The city of Sioux Falls,
shows 6,835 of this in-
The county has 4,548 children
under 6 years, and 10,191 of school
age. It has 12,448 voters and 9,612
men o^ilitary age. The negro popu
lation numbers 43. The unmarried
•*«. us unmarried
graduates, and 262 illiterates. The
home owners number 6,492. Of those
of foreign birth, 303 are from Canada,
803 Denmark, 2,721 England. 1,055 Ger
many, 2,310 Norway, 872 Sweden. The
Brown county returns show a popula-
increase of 102, or
0.4 per cent in the five years. The
city of Aberdeen has a population of
11,846, an increase of 1,093. The coun
ty has 3,480 children under 6 years of
age, and 7,393 of school age. It,has
8,083 voters and 6,549 men of military
age. The unmarried population over
18 years is 3,363 mile and 2,069 fe
male. There are 2,090 persons with
common school education, 333 normal,
266 college training, 225 college grad
uates, 117 illiterates. The home own*
ers number 5,345. Of the leading for
eign born population, 320 are from
Canada, 1,009 Germany, 522 Norway,
790 Russia, 246 Sweden.
Death of Clark Coates.
Sioux Falls.—Clark G. Coates, a well
known South Dakota pioneer, was for
many years one of the best known
horsemen of the state and northwest.
Coates' race track in this city waa
established by him and named in his
honor, and during the days when horse
racing was more in vogue than during
the present time, was the center of
racing in this section of the north
west. He was born in Trumbull coun
ty, O., March 14, 1844, and came to
Sioux FallB City, as it was then
known, in July, 1869, securing employ
ment with C. K. Howard, a famous
pioneer business man. The next win
ter he took charge of Howard's branch
store at Flandreaii, returning to Sioux
Falls in March, 1870, on foot, wading
through water waist deep In some
places. In May of that year he went
to Kalamazoo, Mich., where he was
united in marriage to Miss Ella Pie*
son. Himself and bride returned to
Sioux Falls, and. during-the following
winter kept house in the old barracks,
which had been erected
Tas
a protection
against the then warlike Indians. The
following spring Mr. Coates erected
one of the first frame buildings to be
erected to the new city. For many
years he farmed and became a large
and wealthy land owner. He served
ill many positions of trust in the city
and county, and in 1889 was a member
of the state constitutional convention
lno
""we constitutional convention
less than a year ago.
®«ceeeda Hanten.
ed In state development, should be Pierre.—Announcement has been
tta agrtettHyi town*jus putting bar association, in the disbarment pro
*Tei?
as he am
thl ing Chambers Kellar of Lead, to act
Of the referees from the state
to«rtwthe eeedinga against George W. Egan of
r-itnTTi,^ V?T W Staos Falls. The appointment of Mr.
to Kellar
*°«PW* the action of the court
jMtittttlfltt to in accusing John B. Hanten of Water-
gr|mn, orop producers and town aa
OM
of the ref-
».£32r -M-•
-2
Tb»
75
86
901
356
109
231
495
1,100
243
996
1,416
761
785
239
5'
GENUINE
1,984
3,847
3,9i5
29
:2,4i3
"3,707
364
670
818
1,044
•12,724
458
1,783,.
796
760
l.hiitk.'
46»
2,027 "tc
239U.
292
~T
4,350
'V
i?
V"
The short Interval that elapsed be
tween the visit of the little girl to a
commencement exercise and atten
lance at an old-fashioned camp-meet
ing may explain a remark that she
made at the religious event. She went
there with her grandmother, and, very
nuch Interested in everything that oc
curred, asked numerous questions
which her grandparent attempted to
answer to the best of her ability.
"Who is that woman up there and
what 1b she doing?" asked the little
girl, referring to a woman who was on
her knees in the "amen corner."
"I don't know who she is, but she's
going to get religion," was the reply.
Some time elapsed and the woman
remained on her knees. Finally, the
grandmother of the little girl became
tired of the service and announced
that it was time to leave.
"Oh, let's not go yet," exclaimed her
grandchild. "Let's wait and see 'em
give it to her."—Louisville Times.
Pessimistic View.
"Do you believe the microbes, said
to be in kisses ever develop into any
thing dangerous?" asked the fair maid.
"I'm afraid they do," replied the old
bachelor. "At least I've been told that
marriage is often the result."
A Coudn't Do It.
"1 want you," said the fair society
leader, "to give me a plain opinion
about my latest photograph."
"Madam," said the gallant cavalier,
bowing, "to speak in plain terms of
that portrait would be Impossible!"
The trouble with many of those who
advocate the right is that they are so
disagreeable about it they do more
harm than good.
Daily
Building
"to be continually well,
calls for food that contains
elements that surely build
up the whole system
body, nerves and brain.
Grape-Nuts
—made from whole wheat
and malted barley—con
tains the full nutriment of
the grain, including the
mineral salts* so essential
to balanced re-building.
Grape-Nuts, partially
predigested, agrees splend
idly with child or adult
Requires little work from
the digestive organs and is
quickly absorbed by die
system, generally in about
one hour.
Thousands have found
a helping hand in Crape*
Nuts food—
"There's a Season"
Children Cry for Fletcher's
CASTORIA
Kind Ton Har« Always Bought, and which has been
we for over 30 years, has borne the signature of
And has been made under his per*
sonal supervision since its infancy.
Castoria Is a harmless substitute for Castor OH. Pmu
gorio, Drops and Soothing Syrups. It Is pleasant, tt
contains neither Opium, Morphine nor other Nareottia
Substance. Its age Is its guarantee. It destroys WormS
and allays Feverishness. For more than thirty Tearalfc
Ium been in constant use lor the relief of Constipation!!
flatulency, "Wind Colic, all Teething Troublesand
It regulates the Stomach and Bowels*
CASTORIA
Bears the
WANTED TO SEE THE FINISH
?mall Girl Did Not Consider That the
End of the Proceedings Had
Been Reached.
In Use For Over 30 Years
Th« Kind You Have Always Bought
TMK CSWTWW eOMMNV, NEW VOHK CITT.
J" y* r^\
s*
Allow no one to deceive you in this*
All Counterfeits, Imitations and Just-as-good are but
Zizpeiimeiftts ttat trifle with Md mdMiyer tho bMlth of
Inlantt and Children—Broerlenoe Mrauist BroerlmenU
What la CASTORIA
-V!
c'
ALWAYS
It takes a self-made man a lifetime
to correct his bad grammar.
Drink .Denlson's Coffee,
For your health's sake."
Time is money, yet lotB of people
with plenty of time on their hands
will strike you for a loan.
The discovery of flsh glue is attrib
uted to a Massachusetts man, who,
while making chowder, found that it
stuck to hiB fingers.
Curio Fakers.
Lincoln Springfield, the English edi
tor, was lunching tn London when a
Samoan entered and shook him by the
hand.
"What do the natives do for a living
over there?" Mr. Springfield asked the
Samoan.
"Oh," said the other, "they sell co
coanuts, and
blrdB-of-paradise,
and
Robert Louis Stevenson's inkwell."
DISTRESSING PIMPLES
Removed by Cuticura Soap and Oint
ment. Trial Free.
Smear them with the Ointment
Wash off in five minutes with Cuti
cura Soap and hot water and continue
bathing for some minutes. Repeat on
rising and retiring. These fragrant"
supercreamy emollients do much for
the skin, and do it quickly.
Sample each free by mail with Book.
Address postcard, Cuticura, Dept. XY*
Boston. Sold everywhere.—Adv.
Logical.
Blobbs—Bjones is the most unlucky^
fellow at cards
I
ever met.
Slobbs—Then I suppose he is lucky
in love?
Blobbs—I suppose so. At any rate,
he has never been married.—London
Opinion.
Faded Sentiment.
That beautiful sentiment eventually
dies a sad death would seem to be
demonstrated by a story told the
other night by a southern congreBS?.
man.
Smith, who lives in the suburbs, was
about to hustle for the commutation
train Bome time since, when his wife
followed him to the door aB usual to
make sure that his shoes were tied
and that he hadn't forgotten his neck
tie.
Say, John," reflectively remarked
the good woman as they reached the
veranda, "do you know that this is the
fifteenth anniversary of our wedding?"
"Why, so it is," returned John, do
ing some hasty mental arithmetic. "I
will bring you home a nice bunch ot
roses."
"Roses are very sweet," was the
practical response of mother, "but you
had better make It some oysters to
fry for supper."
Made a Difference. —v -vt
At a dinner party the other evening,
reference having been made to the
good old days in the little brick school
house, this story was recalled by
James L. Rice, coach of the Columbia
college crew:
The teacher In a public school was
giving a demonstration In mesial arlth*
metic, and after speaking at some
length she turned to a bright-faced boy
at the head of thfe class.
"Now, then, Willie," said she, "do
you think that you can answer me a
question in mental arithmetic
"Yes, ma'am," was the confident re-
0f
or ft
Sold by Grocers.
beam,nS youngster.
Well, then," resumed the teacher,
how old would a person be who was
born In 1878?" -At
.. quickly rejo&ied tit
tle Willis. "Was the person a mau
or a woman?"—Philadelphia Tele*
a
'.
"i
s.
•v-
-s
M'
.H1
tmt-
i..
$
fa
ri
k.
k-u
s,
sp«.-.a
ft!1*
T* Bjrv.

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