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The Columbia herald. [volume] (Columbia, Tenn.) 18??-1935, March 08, 1912, Image 3

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TH ''OLUMaXA HERALD, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1912. ,
PREPARATIONS FOR PIETHEIVATCHWORD
! OF G. 0 P. SAYS A
Ifl DEGLAUi HER OF PARTY
COUNTY
Capital M Surplus
MAURY MB j ONAL BANK
U Afllfflfl " Shareholders
WV.UUU.UU g Liabilities
wANT
All
T
OF THE NOTED PAST
RECORDS OF MEN LONG DEAD
REMAIN IN INCOMPLETED
CONDITION.
FOR CONGRESSIONAL DIRECTORY
Middle Name, Date of Birth, Occupa
tion, Among the Numerous Ques
tions Asked by Senator Reed Smoot
in Charge of the Work.
NASHVILLE, Term., Mar. 4. Post
master Wills office is in receopt ot
a bundle of documents from Senator
Reed Smoot, which Is occasioning
some worry. Pursuant to resolu
tion adopted by the United States
senate March 3, 1911, authorizing the
printing of a new edition of the bio
graphical congressional directory, re
?'sed and corrected up to the sixty
second congress, the department has
forwarded blanks which the postmas
ter of Nashville is to fill in with:
"Middle name Living or dead?
of birth?" etc. ad. infinitum. The on
ly question omitted from the list
seemingly is "color of eyes."
Postmaster Wills is absent and As
sistant Postmaster J. T. Lattin and
Miss Addie Vester, secretary to MaJ.
Wills are considering turning over
the documents to the Tennessee His
torical Society or Robert Qnarles,
keeper of state archives. The inqui
ries concern members of the Tifth
congress up to members of the forty
fifth congress, and many inquries are
made concerning the life of James
K. Polk, president from 1845-1849.
This envelope wos forwarded to Mrs.
M. M Gardner, of Nashville, who is
a great granddaughter of President
Polk.
As near as could be determined the
records of the government, which
were submitted to Mrs. Gardner and
Mrs. Howell tire correct and the ques
tions concerning William H. Polk, a
brothel of President James K. Polk,
could not be answered. John J. Ver
trees was called in by Mrs. Gardner
and the examinations of the record
was complete but scant knowledge of
the brother was disclosed.
The other members of the senate
and house inquired of and the nature
of the information desired follows:
Ephraim H. Foster, senator from
state 1838-9, congress, place of birth
iLd middle name.
Jenkins Whiteside, senator 1809-11,
date of birth and middle name.
John Trimble, representative forti
eth coneress; if deceased, and date
of death; if living, occupation ana
place of residence.
Robert Weakley, representatlva In
eleventh congress, want to know mid
dle name.
Jesse Wharton, representative
tenth congress, date of birth.
' William Prosser, representative
forty first congress, middle name; if
oeceaced, date of death, and if living,
occupation, place of residence, etc.
Washington Barrow, representa
tive thirtieth congress, middle name.
Andrew J. Caldweii, representative
fortieth congress, date of birth.
George Washington Campbell, rep
resentative cigth congress, date and
v'.in e of I ir'.h.
V. ;i'...u CljiKs l:-i;orue. r
y. at iilvo fifth n.i rets, d..t t -i
i . e of fcirlh.
John Henry Eaton, senator 1S1S-I'3.
Jute of birth
Andrew Ew'ng, representative thir
. y. first congress date of birth; if Ce
ceased date of death; if living, occu
pation and place of residence.
Edwin H. Ewing, representative
twenty-ninth congress, date and place
of birth; if deceased, date of death.
ABO
TENNESSEANS
J
Gov. John G. Brown, full informa
tion. Horace H. Harrison, member ot
congress 1862 1866; date of birth ana
middle name.
Felix Grundy, member of congress
lb29-!8; wish date of birth and lec
ord after leaving official life.
Many questions are asked concern
ing each of the above- named men
and any information on the matter
should bo sent to the postmaster's of
fice. BIG PROFIT IN
IRISHPOTATOES
HEAVY YIELDS MADE BY INGRAM
BROTHERS ON THEIR FARMS
AT CULLEOKA.
That Maury county is the land of
opportunity was again demonstrated
the past season by the ' record made
by Joe and Charles Ingram in grow
ing potatoes on their farm near Cul
ieoka. Recently the Messrs. . Ingram
disposed o" their second crop of pota
toes of last fall and the returns were
$1,259. This was mad'e on less than
fifty acres of- land. Messrs. Ingram
estimate that, the cost of producing
and harvesting "the crop was about
1,000 which would show a net profit
of $2,200 on fifty acres or more than
forty dollars an acre. This makes
even $100 an acre land seem
nighty cheap. This land was all
planted in wheat and will be sewn
back to clover this spring and will
be none the worse for the heavy
vields.
CENSNS BUREAU
CLERKS DR0PPFD
CONGRESS REFUSES TO MAKE
EXTRA APPROPRIATION FOR
ADDITIONAL HELP.
WASHINGTON, Mar. 1. The last
cf the temporary clerks employed by
the census bureau to compile the
1 910 returns will go out of the govern
ment service tonight. There are 281
temporary clerks still on the-pay loll,
JS states and the District of Colum
bia being represented. Congress re
fused to make the appropriation ask
ed for by Director Durand to keep the
clerks at the bureau until the census
work could be completed.
Tho director says there will be
clkiht delays in one or two census di
visions as the result of the cutting out
of the extra force, but he does not
"link they will be serious. Strenu
ous, efforts to have some of the dis
missed clerks transferred to the reg
ular employe list have been unsuc
cessful. RICHES0N WON'T
LIVETILL MAY
BOSTON.. Mar. 1. Clarence V. T.
Richeson, former pastor and confess
ed slayer of Avis Llnnell, will not
live to meet death in the electric
chair, three months hence, according
to the statements of his keeper at
the Charles street Jail. Physically
he is but a shadow of his former self
and mentally he Is a victim of melan
cholia. He seldom ' sleeps, eats lit-
do and without appetite, and only oc
casionally read; magazines or light
fifiion, which Ions ago took the .!,)ce'
cf rfiu-ieus vorks in w hich he seean-
1 ! f'rd snl.ire at first.
- -' 'i (S to:i.-tan!'y
ni'-vlns
: ' :s '!' fio.n b-il to chair and
:ir t bc.l. At tlu slightest noise;
;n the r-orri'loi he crouches in a cor
hit and tries to hHe himself. Even
U-.tts, the good natured negro con-Jlmlf
vict, who wa& placed in the adjoin-
line' rpll nn Innircr Intoroata Mm Tflnh. !
" .u.. .i.v,u- , ,
eson will talk only with Sheriff j Harsh physics react, weaken the
Qulnn and from him be gets sucbbow&ls, w.U lead to chronic constipa-
news as ho wishes from the outside tion. Dcan'a Regulets operate easily.
world. iu a box at all stores.
COUNTY TEACHERS APPOINT
COMMITTEES FOR VARIOUS
DEPARTMENTS.
GO TO NASHVILLE IN APRIL
Attendance on Middle Tennessee Ed
ucational Association Will Be Sup
plemented by Visit to Factories in
the City Commendable Move.
j "
The tochers meeting Saturday
ttas one of particular importance in
tnat U covered a numDer or mailers
of Interest to the schools throughout
1 the county. Committees were ap
pointed fo: the preparation of sever
al spring events, papers were heard,
and the teachers grew more friendly
and more confidential in the discus-
OtUU Vi iu ,1 W i . t ' Vrf V. " . - w "
exchange of views, theories
turns; an
am A Avnarlanftaa f Vin t Tin a ArotnfnrA
, . - .
not been so free. There was another
move that will doubtless redound to
the benefit of the teachers and pupils
If onrrlorl nut tmil Mint WftH the nro-
oosed visit of the teachers to the
, , ,. tf .,.
M rlrilA Tennessee Educational Asso-
elation at Nashville on April 4-6. In
tV, ta mirmcM-fnti n tnnat ln.11rfn.hlA tXI&-
, ... , .uot
gestion was made, and that was that
the Maury county teachers get tDgeth
er and visit a number of the manu
facturing plants of the city while
there and inform themselves a" a
matter of assistance to the manual
training departments. The friendly
Intercouse and the mutual informa-
tlnn Yi.11 I.a nrnrth a crroat deal
u ii i to
Mrs. Mitchell took up Roman hJsto-
ry. In a skillful and unique way she
showed how Rome had spread law
and o.der over the entire world, ana
how this Influence had been felt in
America. I
Next on the program was a paper
on the "Meaning of Habit in Educa
tion" by Prof. Ashton, which will be
published In full later.
A number of committees were ap-
pointed. The committee on maklng
arrangemeiiia iui visjiiug tei taia iau
tories in Nashville, Prof. W. C. John
son, chairman; D. M. Galloway end
Mrs. Mitchell
Committee on badges L. S. Duke,
whalrman; Mrs. Jesse Tomlinson,
Miss Mary Estes and Miss Ina Doug-
lass
OUIlllL ucuiauiaiui J Ulll-DLO O.LXT W
bo held in Columbia April 3, all dis
tricts in the county to be represent
ed. The committees for this contest
are:
On arrangements L. S. Duke, T.
E. Ashton, Miss Alleen Overton. On
program W. P. Morton, Miss Cora
Lee Jacobs, Miss Minnie Polk. On
Medals J. P. Graham, J. C. Allen.
On judges E. H. WTest, Miss Fannie
Sewell, Miss Orena Hight.
FIRST DEGREE
IS THE VERDICT
RETURNED BY THE JURY AT DE
CATURVILLE IN BEN PETTI
GREW KILLING.
i t rr tTfi iti r t m rr if. .
In the case of George Shelton and
Jv-hn Bailey, charged with the mur
ier of Ben Pettigrew, colored, and
the latter 's son and daughter, on Dec.
1, 1911, the jury returned a verdict
this, morning pronouncing the de
fondants guilty of murder in the first
degree. A motion for a new trial will
bo entered, and argument heard on
it today. It is confidently expected
that the motion will be overruled and
that the uefecdants will be sentenced
to be hanged, in which event an ap
peal will be taken to the supreme
court Each cf the defendants was
tried on only one of the three indict
ments returned against him, that
charging him with the murder of
Pearl Pettigrew, the murder of whom
was especially atrocious, the girl hav
ing been shot as she was running
away from her assailants. The at
torneys ' asked the jury to convict
them of murder in the first degree
with mitigating circumstances, so
that it might be optional with the
.judge whether he sentenced then to
bo hanged or to life imprisonment,
had th jury complied with the request
.ir-d 'e pefeniauts sentenced .o life
if.nmeiu no ar-peal would have
n t .leii in the case.
Trera has teen a large crowd each
day during the trial and tho court
houee'dli not hold more than one-
the people who desired to hear
the case.
I
TWO MEN CONSTITUTE WHOLE
THING IN THE COUNTY OF
. MAURY,
WILL CONTEND FOR RECOGNITION
Oliver Is Sending Out Letters, and
Though Seventy-Two Counties
Have Spoken for Taft, Roosevelt
Fohowen Out for Delegates.
1 Notwithstanding that .seventy-two
ojt of Beventy.flve ecountie8 In tne
gtat0 that haye acted have Mpregged
themselves for President Taft there
Is a strong undercurrent for Teddy,
the terrible, ana the placidneBs of the
republican situation is only another
demonstration of the fact that
"things are not what they seem." W.
J. Oliver will lead the antl-administra-
, - ....
-enojng out letters
to his co-antis. He came out iu a
long interview in the Sunday papers,
. ,, . i v v ,
and the attention of a prominent lo
cal republican was called thereto,
This seemed to give him an oportunl
? to express nimBeif and he did so
m wnat migui ne considered vigorous
.
language, nam ne Deiongea to
tho down and out crowd, and that he
had all to gain and nothing to lose
Amoug other things he said
"Will history repeat itself? Will
the office holders force the nomina
tion of Taft on the masses, who want
Roosevelt and elect a democratic
president. When I say history 1
mean in 1S92 when the office holders
forced the nomination of Harrisoa on
tlie massee against their portest and
. . . .
the people elected Cleveland. Who
is the republican party of the South?
office holders, office seekers and their
hangers on. What do they know
about the doctrines or policy of their
own party? They spell their loyalty
to the party with one word "Pie."
How many can tell you the difference
.between "stand-pat" and "progres
sive" republican? They have no
; fought no policy of their own. Like
workinga of a watch they
passive until wound up by their
bosses; then they raise a howl and
start the ball to rolling to hold their
jobs. Ara they honest and sincere
and do they work as fair people?
From actual observation I have found
them to resort to tricks,
schemes,
to carry
I ....
UUV LLiO ITIOUCD aiiU U1UC1D UL IUQ MUDB
es. How many counties in this fcfate
write their own platforms and resolu
tions? How many are written by
tae bosses at Nashville and Chatta
nooga and sent to the other counties?
i don't believe that there are ten
counties in the state in which these
office holders predominate that are
capable of writing a decent or intel
ligent set of resolutions outside, "Re
aolved, That we the office holders, re
from the bosses, we will endorse any
body who will give us jobs." They
boast about eliminating' the negro.
This has only changed the complex
ion of the delegates but lowered the
standard of the party, for as they are
only a few now now they can carry
out. their dirty plans of deceit, fraud,
lying or anything else that's unfair
to control, and when they can't con
trol they bolt and go to their bosses
who always recognize them, right or
Wrong. I have a letter from the civil
cervice commission asking about ac
tivity of the federal office holders
here, and I answered that as the re
publican party in this state was the
federal office holders and -to not al
low them to participate in the con
ventions would mean that we could
not have any meetings.
"How many republicans have teen
appointed to office under Hooper in
this county? The republican county
executive committee has made sever-
al requests in the way of apointments , oy $l,f!66,605,498, a total increase in
for this county, and none have been . ach deposits in all the banks ot
listened to by the Governor. The $1,950,909,445.
next time our county convention is Constructed 64,037 miles of rail
held if the secretary will call the roaa ip addition to double tracking
names of two of our prominent re- several thousand miles,
yubilcans and tell the convention that! Spont $1,000,000,000 upon its om
s these two gentlemen represent the i mon schools.
.epublican party of Maury county the' Sent through its ports to foreign
meeting is ready for business, and lands merchandise valued at $12,859,
learn their intentions and quickly ad- 739,040 and reclved through tbem
.iourn it will be better for then all. fi'm abroad merchandise valued at
-Tust a word, the republicans of Mau-
ry county should exercise their rights
sfi'P think;n:; only for ri? find try
an ! buil.l up te i;irty."
"V- t rt ?-ir:C ?o r.'nsfcv:!'.. ;.nd If '
we fait t pot the lrcgr.ilion we de- -fi've,'
then there will he soroihlnf: 1
els r.aprtn. You just wait." And
-vith a significant twinkle in his eye
that meant more than had been ex-
pressed he repeated, "Wait"
Cn W nrlTl aallv ha ma an itit tU
" ' ' '""-'.'
love and affection so much boasted
cf by the g. o p. leaders In the state
Is only on the surface, and is hardly
like beauty, skin deep.'
wmt will
With
You get ahead on what j'ou save, not on what you earn.
When you've worked hard for your money is it not folly to squand .
er it?
BANK your money and this will give you more pleasure than
fooling it away. Besides when the "rainy day" comas you'll have
shelter.
We will help you save, as we pay interest, and the MONE Y
that you've worked for WILL WORK FOR YOU in our bank.
( Let OUR Bank be YOUR Bank
PHOENIX NATIONAL BANK
DIXIE
PIG THE PAST
THIRTMWO YEARS
POPULATION INCRAESED BY
OVER FOURTEEN MILLION
PEOPLE.
AND PROPERTY IS DOUBLED
Southern Property Is Now Worth
Mote Than Two Billions Above the
Valuation of the Whole Country in
1860.
BALTIMORE.Mareh 4. In its thir
tieth snniversary issue the Manufac
turers Record says:
In the past thirty-two years, with
its population increasing in number
by 13,474,935,. the south has t
Addf d $3,068,000,000 to its capital
invested in manufacturing.
Cut 352,721,000,000 feet of lumber.
Harvested 30,503,926,000 bushels of
leading grains of which 24,485,309,000
were corn, 3,070,258,000 oats and 2,
948,359,000 wheat, in addition co all
the rice grown in the country nov av
eraging from 18,000,000 to 20,000,000
a year.
Marketed 258588,439 bales of cot
ion increasing the annual production
from 5,761,252 bales to 12,129,055
bales in the season ended August 31,
1911, and to more than 15,000,000 in
the present season.
Added 93,200,000 to the capital in
vested in cotton seed oil mills.
Made 63,168,000 tons of pig iron and
140,600.000 tons of coke.
Mined 1,523,000,000 tons of coal.
Dug 121,300,000 tons of iron ore.
Sold 37,700,000 tons of its pebble
and rock phosphate.
Produced 715,000,000 barrels of pe
troleum. Increased its capital in the textile
industry by $274,000,000, representing
1J,649,832 more spindles and 214,432
looms than it had in 1880, which are
using 3,031,256,456 more pounds of
raw cotton now than then.
Swelled the resources of its nation
al banks by $1731,100,168, their capi
tal by $182,964,920 and their individ
ual deposits by $884,303,937, with in
dividual deposits in other financial
institutions increasing the same lime
$2,014,671,812.
Its cyj-orts hfive constituted uearly
'.5 i r cent
of tho total esporta of
fio'r, the reentry, and j
to..l rfil.r.::!.3'.--r r n-; r?y
rr-r ctr.t, ri ;,i p'-'?'iis the va! of
: jit!n :lo!if. Tho value of those
cottcn exports was$l,949,:ci,C06
nreatc-r than the value of the world's
o itput of gold ir. the thirty-two years,
and the value of the thirty-two cotton
TfiT a Tilth tliplr HPPft U'hlrh WSS
" " " '
'.15,514,000,000, wsa $5,001,350,158
greater than the world's production
of gold and silver in the same period,
Though there has been com para-
DOINGS
ypvL do
ft ?
tively little change in the proportion
ate exports of cotton, the difference
being only that between 68 per cent
of the total American crop in 1880
and 61.1 per cent in 1911, there has
been a radical shift in the relative po
sitions of the southern mills and
those in the rest of the country. In
the period under review mills In the
rest of the country consumed 61,916,
938 bales of the commercial crops
and southern mills 37,532,673 bales.
But whereas jn 1880 the 179,000 bales
eonsuin ed by southern mills were but
a little more than 10 per cent of the
Americal consumption of cotton, in
1911 southern mills used 54.2 per cent
of the American consumption, moan
while having used in three other
years more cotton than the mills of
the rest of the country.
It is not surprising that such
achievements have been recorded in
an addMIon of $18,323,000,000 to the
estimated true value of southern
properly, that increase actually be
ing in amount $2,163,000,000 greater
than the wealth of the whole coun
try in 1860 and nearly twice the value
of southern property in 1880.
EGG RECEIPTS ARE
SIMPLY IMMENSE
BARN YARD FOWLS OF MAURY
COUNTY ARE WORKING OVER
TIME NOW.
That the hens have' commenced to
work in real earnest again in Maury
county is demonstrated daily by the
enormous egg receipts. Every coun
try store in the county is receiving
eggs by the hundreds of dozens and
the huckster wagons are doing a lanov
office business. The receipts are re
ported heavier than they have been
for a year. The Culleoka Produce Co.
at Culleoka, shipped the first full car
of eggs on Friday that has been ship
ped from tha section in a year. The
ctr contained 6,000 dozen bought
from the farmers at an average or
20 cents per dozen, making about
$1,200 that has been distributed In
the community for eggs alone within
the period of a week. Fortunately
the produce company had the eggs
sold in New York before the slump in
prices came.
TATE AND DEAN
IN GILES COUNTY
HAVE ESETABLISHED EXPERI
MENTAL FARMS FOR DEMON
STRATION WORK IN 1912.
PUIASKI, Tenn., Mar. 1. Profs.
T'ate and Dean, accompanied by
Pof. II. B. Gwaltney, went to Camp-
bellsvllle Tuesday to establish an ag-
iculti'.ral experiment farm on the
Il iad cf T!ob Campbell, the work t) bo
iKrccred b Kama Camr-bell. This is
i'.i" iVii'ii'ii ffir,:i in Olls ct'iirty, wher
wxperlMieiit.il work will he carried on
luring 1912. There Is one on the R.
C Ingram faim at Piogali, one at De
Ray, on G. T. Buford's farm, ond one
cn the farm of John Burns near town.
"Suffered day and night the tor
ment of itching plW v Nothing help
ed me until I used Doan's Ointment.
The emit was lasting. Hon. John B.
OanretV Mayor, Glrard, Ala.5 -' " '

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