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The Columbia herald. [volume] (Columbia, Tenn.) 18??-1935, July 02, 1920, Image 1

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VOL. LXXII NO. 27
Columbia, Tennessee, Friday, july, 1920
ESTABLISHED IN 1848
LEAGUE NATIONS PLANK
E
MILT A ff DID IS
ADOPTED BY DEMOCRATS
PLATFORM COMMITTEE WOULD
5. MAKE TREATY CLEARER AND
7 MORE SPECIFIC.
WALSH AMENDMENT ADOPTED
fit L:t .
Proposed Reservations Are Merely
Interpretative and Are Not Urtac-
eeptable to President Wilson,' Is In
dication This Morning.
(By United Press)
CAN FRANCISCO, . July 1. The
resolutions committee adopted the
league of nations plank, putting the
jbarty on record as favoring the rati
fication of the treaty without impair
ing its essential integrity, but with
an amendment by Senator Walsh, of
Massachusetts, stating that the party
does not oppose any reservations
which may make the pact clearer aud
"more specific on the American obligal
tions and sovereignty under the
league.
...The amendment offored by Senator
Walsh was adopted was adopted by a
vote of thirty-two to eighteen after
four hours of heated debate, during
which Walsh made an Impassioned
appeal to the committee.
.The action'was a complete surprise
-nd caused a sensation among lead
ipg democrats ho expected to adopt
the administration plank without
amendment.
Senator Walsh ; first urged a com
plete substitute for the so-called Vir
ginia plank. Senator Wahlh holds
that the adoption of his amendment
Justified the democratic senators who
vpted for the Lodge reservations.
" ,The session at which the fight over
the league of nations plank occurred
raVtnaTked'by unusual WoftTQt S
: ator Glass, chairman of the tesoM.'
ttons committee to keep secret the
liberations and actions of the commp
fee.' Numerous guards were stationed
about" the committee room, and all
persons not members of the commit
tee' were ordered to remain fifty feet
J away from the ' doors. Chairman
Glass pledged the committee to abso
lute secrecy until the work has been
completed and the platform ready for
the convention. ' .. 1
When the committee met again this
morning the liquor and Irish planks
.remained to be decided. AS drafted
by the sub-committee, the platform
was silent on prohibition!
; ("By United PreM.l
WASHINGTON, July 1 The league
of nations plank adopted by the reso
lutions committee of the democratic
convention , Is not unacceptable to
President Wilson, it was indicated in
administration circles this morning.
The plank calls for the treaty's rat
ification without reservations which
impair its essential integrity, but puts
the party on record as unopposed to
reservations which make the treaty
"clear, and more specific."
Officials close to President Wilson
laid , that the President at no time
since the beginning of the treay fight
had been opposed to interpretative
reservations which the plank calls
for as they interpret it
TRUCK SERVICE
FROM LEWISBURG
STARTS ON TIME
vJ ,t'ii
ON ITS INTIAL TRIP THIS MORN
ING ARRIVED HERE TEN MIN
UTES BEFORE SCHEDULE. (
CENTREVILLE LEFT PROMPTLY
Morning Papers Delivered on Streets
of the City Shortly After Seven
O'clock Morning Mail Dispatched
on Train to Spring Hill.
Columbia's new mail truck service
from Lewisburg started oft today
most auspiciously. 1 The truck arrived
with the southbound mail at ten miit
utes to 7 o'clock when it was due;
The Nashvile morning papers were
being delivered on the streets by 7
o'clock this morning.
Promptly on the arrival of the
truck and the working of the mail the
truck to Centreville by way of Wil
liamsport was dispatched. It arrived
ed in Centreville by 9 o'clock. The
truck from Lewisburg came by Culleo
ka and Glendale without mishap.
Not only does this line serve all of
Columbia and its routes, Glendale and
Culleoka and their routes, but the
mail .for Spring Hill and Carter's
Creek is dispatched on the accommo
dation and arrives In time to go out
over their, rural routes. Of course
there will be some disappointment for
a few days as all of the mall for the
county will not be routed so as to
nFTafid via the truck, but that will be
straightened out in a few days.
Botb'of the carriers, that from Lew
sb'urig'jand to Centreville will be
fequipped to convey passengers. There
lno schedule' for the return trip to
Lewisburg, as' ho mall is carried back,
so that Cy Young, who has the con
tract, can select the hour that will
accommodate the largest number of
passengers.
ORDINANCE MAY
REQUIRE TAKING
ANALYSIS WATER
CITY BOARD WILL HEAR RE
PORTS ON WORK DONE ON CO-.
, LUMBIA WATER PLANT. '
SEWERAGE QUESTION DISCUSSED
Very Little Business Outside of Reg
ular Routine Expected to Come Up
at Meeting' of Council Mayor May
Make Report. " .
Very little business outside of the
regular routine will come before the
board of mayor and aldermen, meet
ing in regular Bession Friday evening.
It is not unlikely', however, that the
question of Columbia's water supply
will again be brought up,1 tttid it is en
tirely possible that an. ordinance will
be passed on first reading, requiring
that the city reservoir and filtration
plant be cleaned at stated intervals
under the direction of the city health
officer, and also that samples of wa
ter be taken for analysis at stated In
tervals, as requested in' a resolution
passed recently by the Kiwanis Club.
It is expected, that Manager J. S.
Robinson, of the Columbia Water &
Light Company, will appear before
the board to make his report concern
ing the work that has been done by
the Water & Light Company since
the last meeting of the board. Mr.
Robinson will be in a position to re
port that the reservoir has been clean
ed, and that new sand has been plac
ed in the filtration plant, and that an
analysis by Dr. Olin West, secretary
of the state board of health will show
that the contamination noted several
weeks ago has been removed, and
that the water is fit for human con
sumption.
. The question of sewerage will also
be brought up, it is expected. Atten
tion will be called by Alderman Louis
Barker to the fact that some residents
of Columbia have connected sewers
with an jpenwe;llHe will contetid.
that this 13" In violation of hoth state
and city law, and seek to have it rem
edied. ; ; ... . sse
H Is expected that Mayor Cherry
will make a report on the work of the
police department,: talliffg especial at
tention to the large number of arrests
for speeding during the bast month. ".
GOVERNOR COX
IS NOT WORRIED
OHIO EXECUTIVE WATCHES PO
LITICAL DRAMA AT FRISCO '
FROM HOME IN DAYTON.
(By United Press.)
DAYTON, O., July 1. Governor
Cox; who Is at his home here watching
the political drama being enacted at
San Francisco, apeared unconcerned
as to the outcome of the convention.
If the Governor, had any feeling of
anxiety, he has successfully masked
his emotion. He was down town ear
ly this morning, directing the work of
getting out the edition of his daily paper.
Meeting To
Discuss
Baseball
There will be a mass meeting at the
county court room tomorrow after
noon at 4 o'clock of all of the citizens
who are interested in the organization
of a baseball team for Columbia. Lu
ther Cook manager of the Lawrence
fa um teaW and former star of the
American league having played with
the Yankees, is here today investi
gating the situation. The officers and
directors of the Lawrenoeburg team
will be here to attend the meeting
Every citizen in the city and county
who is interested in having baseball
here is earnestly asked to come to
this meeting where the whole matter
can be threshed out. .
THREE COLUMBIA CHURCHES UNITE
SERVICES DURING NEXT MONTHS
CONFEDERATES WILL
MEET ATCpUBT HOUSE
GENERAL JOHN Lij j; JONES - ' RE
QUESTS ALL VETERANS IN
COUNTY BE THERE 9 O'CLOCK.
AH members of Wm. Henry Trous
dale Camp and all Confedrate soldiers
la Maury county are requested , to
meet Dr. J. G. Williamson, the com
mander; at the County Court room
at 9 o'clock Saturday -morning to get
their badges and march to the High
school building to the exercises. .: .
LINE OF MARCH
VETS OF; SOUTH
NEXT SATURDAY
Henry TroUBdale Camp, commanded
by the commander of the camp, Dr.
J. G. Williamson.
Line of inarch Go north on Athe
naeum street to Seventh street, then
down the south side 'of Seventh sreet
east and around the court house, then
back up the north pide of 'Seventh
street to Athenaeum' street, then to
the High School. ; -
By order of ; .' !
, , "J. L. JONES,
"Commanding Second Brigade Tenn.
Division. I
..,Uw.WByBJ
"Adjutant and Chief of staff.".
The troops will be met at the sta
tion with automobiles on their arrival
from Nashville and taken to the High
School where the exercises will be
held at 10:25 o'clock. The program
there. will be rendered as follows:
Presiding officer, Gen. U John L.
Jones.'
Address of welcome, J. I. Finney,
editor of The Herald. '
Response, Gen. Evander Sheppard,
of Shelbyville.
Poem, John Trotwood Moore, state
librarian. '
Delivery of pictures of Robert . E.
Lee, donated by Maury National Bank
to local veterans, Dr. John H. Barber.
Immediately after the conclusion
of the exercises the parade will start
and after that dinner will be served at
the High School. After dinner-the
veterans will take autos for a trip to
St. John's church and returning go
to Oliver's Garage where a dance of
the sixties will be given. '. .
ESSEX SW
MS DUCK
B, LATEST TEST
BIG
CAR ' PLUNGES jaRflUGrt
NEARLY FOUR FEET WATER
1 V WITHOUT HITCH. ' "
Three of the churches of Columbia
will unite in night services during
the months of July and AugusL The
uniting churches are the First' Metho
dist, First Presbyterian and Garden
street Presbyterian. '
tv, vlll tu held next
Sunday night in the Garden Street
1'resbyterian church and Dr. mouoj.
Pastor of the First Presbyterian
church will preach the sermon. The
following Sunday night, July 11th, the
service will be held at the First Pres
byterian church, then In succession
to the First Methodist church.
The services will alternate from
church to church and the speakers
will be advertised from week to week.
The choir where the service is held
will.be responsible for, the musiC
"If the Essex had a few days long
er to grow wings, it could fly," said
Colonel William Fry this morning, fol
lowing the latest Btunt performed by
this remarkable car, when' on yester
day "Wild Man" Matthews swam the
Essex across Duck river at the Sowell
ford. At this place the water is be
tween three and four feet deep, and
the Essex made the trip across the
river and return without a hitch. The
only inconvenience was the fact' that
the Wild, Man got his feet wet when
the water poured up into the body of
tho car.
Since the first of the present
"Watch the Essex Week" this car has
been put through all manner of seem
ingly impossible gaits, climbing the
twenty per cent grade on the Wil
liams bill on the Santa Fe pike 'in
high gear, walking Up the court house
steps, pulling to the top of reservoir
hill, and running for twenty-one and
one-half miles on one gallon of gaso
line, touring around and hitting 'em
off at the rate of a little better than
a mile per minute. .
Those who have not actually wit
nessed these remarkable perform
ances find , it hard to be lieve them,
but sufficient evidence has been secur
ed of each test to make It official.
About the only thing the Essex
has not yet done is to take wings and
fly and the "Wild Man" is becom
ing more and more convinced that
this could be done with a little prac
tice. . '
SHOO
IE
mm
mm m
ANOTHER EFFORT
TO CONSOLIDATE
NINTH
SCHOOLS
i
rtf
ADVOCATES OF . MORE CENTRAL
LOCATION FOR McDOWELL TO
"APPEAR BEFORE BOARD.
GEN. JOHN L, JONES, COMMAND
ER, ISSUES ORQER FOR GUID
ANCE OF THfj: SOLDIERS.
PROGRAM FOR DAYS EXERCISES
Speaking, Parade, Dinner, Trip to 8t.
John's Church and Dance Will
Make Up the Festivities of the Oc
casionAutos Wanted.
In General Orders No. 1 Gen. John
L. Jones, commanding the second bri
gade of the Tennessee pivision, an
nounces the line of march for the vet
erans of the South in the reunion here
on Saturday. The , order is as fol
lows: i
"General Order No. 1.
"Line of march and parade for re:
union Columbia, Tenn., July 3, 1920.
Form at the High j School with the
band in front followed by Major Gen
eral J. P. Hickman, j commanding the
Tennessee Division and his staff, Bri
gade , Generals and their staffs com
manding the first and third brigade,
followed by. Company B, under com
mand of Captain Griffin, then Troop A
under command of Captain C. L. Tem
ple; followed by Troop C, command
ed by Capt. J. R. Sadler, then all sol
diers not in any company nor as or
organized camp under Captain M. B.
Tomlinson. Closed bv the William rclt,zen8 whom he said, Would repre
sent a majority of the patrons of the
school would appear before" the board
Monday and urge a changed location.
It is expected that those who are for
the West End. location will also be
present. Many have subscribed for
the new building conditioned that it
be located in v West End. It is said
on the other hand that there - are
mtiny whp .did not subscribe because
of the location but who will do so if
if, Is changed to a more central point
or consolidated with the city schools.
' Much oratory is expected when the
AT ITS MEETING ON MONDAY
fe A Iff v'-'-l ' ' - I ;, i i i
Lively Scrap Is Expected When Issue
Is Again Raised Over Placing the
New Building Anywhere Besides. In
Center of West End.
Another effort will be made at the
meeting of the county board of Educa
tion on next Monday to locate the
McDowell school buildihg at a point
heare the center if the Ninth dis
trict. ' For several years the question
of placing the school nearer the cen
ter of the district or of consolidating it
with the city elementary schools bavs
been a live topic and bobs up at regu
lar intervals. ' ;
Since the appropriation by ,the
County court for a new building and
the subscription of $ 10,000 by the
citizens another determined effort
will be made to change the loca
tion. The advocates of a new loca
tion realize that if they sit by and
permit a $30,000 building to be er
ected it will mean an end of consoli
dation or a change in the location.
-William E. Brittian stated this
morning that a large delegation of
clock mm is cry
OF RIVAL fTOAGERS flS:,
COfJIflTIOfj 111 TODAY
GREAT AUCTION
SALE
HEREON
OF JERSEYS
AUG. 1 1
BALLANFANT AND - FARISS WILL
SELL FIFTY HEAD, ALL OF
.N- THEM LOYALLY BRED.'
PUBLIC'S FINE OPPORTUNITY
Offering Will Be On Second Day of
Middle Tennessee Farmers Insti
tute and a Large Crowd of Buyers
Is Expected Here. 1
One of the biggest auction sales of
pure bred Jersey cattle ever held in
the Dimple will be that of the cows
of Joseph Ballanfant and Mora B.
Fariss on Wednesday, August 11 t
the Middle ' Tennessee Experiment
Station.
There are fifty head in the offer
ing, consisting of registered
cows,
bred heifers and probably a few
young bulls and heifers. The cows
pla'ced in the sale by Mr. Ballanfant
ar8 all bred to Jasper Tormentor.
The heifers of this bull are beauties.
The cows and heifers of Mr. Fariss
have been bred to Pogis 99 of Hood
Farm 60th, a son of Pogis 99th and
out of Sophie Toronoa's Damsel.
There are in the offering two or
three imported cows and the re
mainder nre of the finest strains of
Maury county products.
-Many of the' cows in this sale test
ovejr eight per cent and every one
in the list will adorn and herd or
member. ot-4he-onnty . board tneet. - Krove profitable' to! dfiy"aaIrV;
Both Messrs. Fariss and jCallai-
MORE AUTOM0BILES-F0R
TES NEEDEO
COh'FEDERJI
TOTAL OF $9,691.24 EXPENDED
FOR THE MONTHS OF APRIL
MAY AND JUNE. " "
.. t , ...... 1 . .. .
. - .... - V .
School expenses for the quarter
ending June 30 were 9,691.24 accord
ing to the report which Superintend
ent Graham will submjt to the quar
terly court at the July meeting. . All
but about. f 2,000 of this sum -was ex
pended for teachers salaries which
amounted to $7,419.50. The next larg
est item was that of maintenance
which called for $859.41. Other items
of expense were: County board of
education, $95; supervisors, $67; cen
sus, $2.28; attendance officer, $100;
janitors, $130.50; fuel, $512.34; insur
ance, $266.49; heating plant, $82.75;
desks, $56. - s f
This is the lightest quarter of the
rear as it embraces the months of
April, May and June and many of the
elementary schools closed the last of
March and nearly all during April, ao
that the accounts are light.'
i, ' ' '
i i!j
OWNERS OF CARS ARE REQUEST
ED TO GET IN TOUCH WITH DR.
J HARDISON AT ONCE. T .
To insure a seat for all the old
"Johnny Rebs" coming from Nash
ville Saturday morning to attend the
Reunion of Middle Tennessee Veter
ans, more atuomoblles: ' are badly
needed," and bwiiers of cars ' are re
quested to get in touch with Dr. Har
dison at the Hardison Garage if they
can place their automobile at . the
disposal of the committe for a short
Wme Saturday. :" The ' boys Mri
gray, are not as young as when they
followed the "Stags and Bars of the
lost cause" in '61, and transportation
from the railway staion to the high
school must ..'be provided for them;
also for th6 trittjibjt. John's. ';
DESCENDANTS WILL ;
OBSERVE BIRTHDAY
f ant have long been prominent in the
breeding and development of Jerseys
in Maury county.. They not only know
good Jersey's but they love the breed.
Mr. Fariss has taken a special jfride
in the collection of the best and it
is with keen, regret that circum
stances are such that he will have to
dispose of his famous herd.
The sale will take place en the aft
ernoon of the second day of the Mid
dle Tennessee Farmrs Institute here
and with stich a fine ' offering and
large crowd as 1s expedted some hew
records for Maury county . Jerseys
ought to be made. v " P "' '
JUNIOR ORDER III
INSTALL OFFICERS
Junior Order members will meet In
their room in The Herald bailding at
8 o'clock tonight for the purpose of
installing officers. "All are expected
to fte present '
'tti
T
EIGHTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF
THOMAS B. BROOKS TO BE
MADE REUNION DAY. ' '
Thomas B. Brooks, one of the old
est and best known citizens of the
Hampshire section, will on next Sat
urday celebrate his eighty-fifth birth
day by having a reunion of all of his
descendants. Mr. Brooks has a large
number of children, grand-children
and some great "grand-children and
an effort is being made to have all of
them present. It is expected that
nearly a hundred relatives and friends
will gather around the ancestral home
to wish this honest old man many
more years of useful service.
STATED MEETING OF
" MASONS FOR TONIGHT
. v SJ, Jj!S 'TV'
ALLMASTER MASONS ARE URG
ED TO ATTEND THIS MEETING
s OF THE LODGE.
The regular monthly stated meeting
of Columbia Lodge No. 31, Free and
Accepted Masons, will be held tonight
at 8 o'clock. All Master Masons are
urged to be present ,
COLUMBIA TAXES
" ARE UP TOMORROW
if - iV- i
EQUALIZATION BOARD TO HEAR
COMPLAINTS FROM WITHIN
. CORPORATION LIMITS.
Taxpayers of Columbia who desire
to make complaints or have their as
sessments readjusted will be heard by
the' board of equalization ' tomorrow.
The board has completed the ninth
disrict outside of the city limits, and
when the city is finished its work will
be completed. The board plans to
finally adjottrn tomorrow evening. It
will have been continually in session
for three weeks. '
ENEMY ALIENS
BEING DEPORTED
STRENGTH OF FORMER SECRETA
, , RY OF .TREASURY , BECOMING "
MORE AND MORE APPARENT
TEN NAMES BEFORE HOUSE
Balloting Will Probably Not Begirt -Until
Late This Evening or Tonight.
Platform Fight Still It Raging Not
Yet Submitted.
(By United Press.) '
SAN FRANCISCO, July Jl. It wa
McAdoo against the field today.
Managers of the rival aspirants for
the democratic presidential nomina
tion declared this morning . that the
first business when the convention
balloting began would be to 'block
McAdoo. ' ' ' -
Leaders of the big camps opposing
the former secretary of the treasury
said the greatest weakness lay in
the Inability to -form a definite alli
ance for the purpose of holding the
McAdoo boom down.
- Managers of Governor Cox's cam
paign declared, however, that the for
mality of a "block" was Unnecessary
as enough anti-McAdoo delegates
have been corralled already to insure
his defeat. V
(By United Presa.)
e NEW YORK, July 1. Betting in the
financial district ''bn the democratid
presidential nomination gives odds of
hine to five against Governor Smith;
of New York, and the same odds
UgainBt McAdoo and Wilson. Odds of -
six to one are offered against Cum-- -mings.
Odds of two to one are quot- ,
ed against Champ Clark and Vice
President Marshall.
, (By United Press.) v ' -
SAfT FRANCWCOr 'July 'l.-lrame-
dlately after the convention conven
ed this motning the name of Senator
F. M. Simmons, of- North ': Carolina, '
was placed in nomination by W.
Newland, of the same state. Ten'1
names were placed in nomination be
fore the adjournment of the oonven-
tion Wednesddy, they being-,' MoAddo,
Cox, Edwards, A. Mitchell Palmer, '
Smith, Gerard, Hitchcock, Meredith, ?
Glass and Davis. ,' ),., '
V
BANDITS ATTACK
MEXICAN TRAIU
AMERICAN - ABOARD ESCAPE8,
ACCORDING TO ADVICE RE-"
CEIVED BY DEPARTMENT.
(By .United Preset w i. i-
WASHINGTON, July 1. Fifty more
enemy aliens were deported during
the week ending yesterday, it was
learned today at the labor depart
ment. , .
(By United Press.) ' "
WASHINGTON, July A Mexican
armored ' train, carrying ' Americans,
was attacked' and blown Up by ' ba
dits Tuesday In the state of Chihua-
hua, according to reports received '. .
this morning at the state department
from the Mmerican consul at Chlhua-; ';
hua City. All Americans were safe.
Occupants of the ' rear? coaches sue- ti
cessfully defended themselves until y
they were reinforced.1
PATRIOTIC MEETING
AT CULLEOKA CHURCH
u v
The laymen of the Central Presby
terian church at Culleoka on Sunday
morning at 11 o'clock will hold a pa
triotic meeting. Several addresses
will be made, and special music ren
dered.. - - , r '
JOSEPH f! IIAYSE ANNOUNCES f OR
i REPRESENTATIVE IN THE PRIMARY
Lieut. Joseph M. Hayse, prominent
young attorney, this morning made
formal announcement of his candida
cy for the house of representatives
subject to the democratic primary on
August 5, next. This action was fore
casted several days ago when a peti
tion numerously signed, was present
ed to Mr. Hayse asking him to make
the race. '
Those who know Joe. Hayse are cer
tain that he will Inject life and pep
Into the. campaign. He is well quali
fied for the place he seeks, having
had long experience on the farm, in
the school room as a teacher, served
his country overseas, having been a
volunteer. He has also done a great
deal of public service work, taking
an active part in all the post war
drives. He is a speaker of ability and
is personally very popular. Mr. Hayse
is acive in church, fraternal and busi
ness and professional circles.
For the present Mr. Hayse stated ,1
that he wonld have nothing but his '
formal announcement to make, but :
that at a later date he would give hit .
friends his views on public issues

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