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The Columbia herald. [volume] (Columbia, Tenn.) 18??-1935, March 11, 1921, Image 2

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THE COLUMBIA HERALD- FRIDAY, MARCH if, 192 r
II. F. ALEXANDER f
IS THOUGHT HAVE
ENDED OWN LIFE
PROMINENT FARMER AND CAT
TLE DEALER MYSTERIOUSLY
DISAPPEARED FROM HOME.
TELEGRAM FROMYUMA, ARIZONA
8ays Man Fitting Description of Mr.
Alexander Killed Himself There
Yesterday Efforts Make Complete
Identification Continue.
(From Wednesday's Dally Herald.)
Henry Frank Alexander, extensive
cattle dealer, big farmer, dealer In
phosphate lands, and one of tho most
prominent and widely known citizens
of Maury county, is believed to have
committed suicide at Yuma, Arizona,
Tuesday, according to information re
ceived here by frjends and relatives.
. The finding of the body at Yuma, lo
cated In one of the most remote spots
of the United States, on tho line bo
tureen Arizona and California, and
near the International line which sep
arates the United States from Mexico,
and the mysterious disappearance of
Mr. Alexander from his home here,
and his somewhat peculiar actions
Just prior to his disapearance have
been coupled together by friends and
relatives here, and it is no longer
doubted that Mr. Alexander came to
his death by his own hands.
On last ?, Thursday Mr. Alci&hflor
shipped .'ar load of cattle to the
Loulsvillovniferket, and on U;h,:he Is
reported to 'have lost heatU!' it is
also repoitWd to have lost considerable
money iti 'phosphate" transactions dur
ing the past few months, but after
getting out his cattle Thursday, with
out saying a word to his family con
cerning his departure from home, he
Is said. Jto have, boarded a train for
Alabama, and for a day or two he re
mained in Northern Alabama and was
seen in Florence, Sheffield and Deca
tur. -It Js fepprted that William Bur
nett, of Columbia, saw Mr. Alexander
at Decatur, and that Mr. Alexander
told Mr! Burnett ho was in r.earch of
worS! as a' laborer. Mr. Burnett tried
to ajei$iia4e iHx Alexander tp return
to Columbia! with, him, j-emindingikim
of Hhe 'fact 'that ho had two good
farms and other splendid property in
Ma'ury4 county which needed his 'at
tention: r.' Burhett'B efforts to have
Mr. Alexander return with him prov
ed unavailing, and tho next report of
MfcjAJflfandor'.a wlJT.fft:lJ?P.'tf8 ca,mPJ
from Birmingham, wnrro lie is report
ed to.have been seen by someone who
. ? M '' '
knew him. x
It is said that Mr. Alexandor pur-
chased a ticket at Decatur; Ala., for
Florida, and later went, back to the
ticket office and Btated that ho had
decided not to go to Florida and want
odto pxchange his ticket for one to
New- Orleans. At this time Mr. Al
exander's disapearance was causing
considerable uneasiness at homo, and
every effort was being made to locate
him. .Friends here got into communi
cation with Fred Evans, an old Colum
bia boy, but who now lives at New Or
leans, and Mr. Evans notified rail
road, and civil authorities of Mr. Al
exander's! (disappearance and Bought
their aid in locating him. A verita-
Die dragnet was spread by railroad de
tecttves find state and county author!
ties, throughout tho west, and it is be
lieved that It was through this agency
tbe( report of the death was re
ceived., , .
It is. reported that Mr. Alexander,
on the eve of his departure from Co
lumbia telephoned to Spring Hill and
secured the address of Percy Brown,
who is now in California. It is believ
ed that Mr. Alexander Intended to
go to California and making an eort
to keep his whereabouts unknown,
he went to Yuma in the extreme south
western corner of Arizona.
The dead man wus registered at the
Yuma Hotel us Charles Thompson, of
Knoxvillo, Tennessee, but according
to the description received by friends
here, , tho nanio Alexander Co
lumbia, Tenn was found sewed in his
inner coat. Tho description
of the dead man stated that he weigh
ed ftjbout 250 pounds, and that ho had
a crippled hand. This description tal
lies almost exactly with Mr. Alexan
der. . Whilo he did not weigh 250
pounds, bo was a large man and had
the appearance of weighing that much,
lie alBO had a crippled hand. The
laundry mark found in tho dead man's
collar, A127. also tallies with Mr. Al
exander's laundry mark at the Colum
bia laundry. This was looked up on
the records here last night upon the
receipt of the tek'uram askin;; for in
foramtlon. Mr. Alexander is reported to have
attempted to' leave home before, hav
ing been detained by his wife, who
urgeM him to remain. On the eve of
bis Weparturo, he is said to have told
a friend here he was going to
take "a long journey,'' but at that
time the friend thinking all was well
with him. said nothing to Ms family
or friends.
Columbia relatives are making ev
ery possible effort to secure more defi
nite Information from the remote little
Arizona town, but owing to the great
distance, and to the uncertainty of
telegraphic correspondence from that
section, and tho difference in tlme.thls
has proved a difficult undertaking, but
It was believed that Bomethingymoro
definite will be received before night.
Mr. Alexander was a member of ono
of the most prominent families of tho
county, Ho married , a sister of, tho
Rev. W. A. Provlne, of.Nashvillo, one
of the leading ministers of the Pres
byterian church, U. S. A. Ho was a
brother-in-law of former State Senator
W. B. Greenlaw. --
Mr. Alexander was about fifty-three
years of age, and is survived by his
wife and two children, ono boy, Henry
F., Jr., and one daughter, Evelyn,
threo brothers, Clarence, Eugene and
Will Alexander, and by, ono sister,
Miss Carrie Alexander; also by his
aged mothor, Mrs, Frank Alexander.
Mr. Alexander was devout and con
sistent member of the Garden street
Presbyterian ohurch, and had long
been activo in affairs of his county
anil state, always standing firm upon
what he believed to be right.
It is regarded as a certainty that
Mr. Alexander's queer departure from
homo and his actions thereafter were
those of a man mentally unballanced.
It is certain that his losses on either
cattle or phosphate land were not just
cause for his action, for he was a man
of considerable property, owning
much valuable farm land in this coun
ty and other property.
It had been known for several days
by tho general public that Mr. Alexan
der had disappeared from homo, but
his .return was almost momentarily
expected by his friends and relatives,
and no mention of the fact was made
through tho press, and the news re
ceived from the Arizona town last
tight, spread like 'wildfire- here and
was largely tho topic of, conversation.
:&: .C'-
TAPS SOUNDS FOR
I1
VETERAN
MEMBER BATTERY F 114TH FIELD
ARTILLERY DIES IN HOSPITAL
OTEEN, N. C.
(From Tuesday's Daily Herald.) .
News has been received here of the
death of Raymond Hughes, gallant
young veteran of the. world war, which
occurred. at government hospital No.
60, Oteen, N.;C,, where he, had been
confined since the return of his regi
ment, tho llllli, field artillery, from
France.
Young Hughes was a! foster son of
Mr1, and Mrfl. A.' Z. Hughes, and was
born' on March 15, 1901,' arid therefore
was hot -yet -twewty-one years of age.
Despite his youth wfieu the call to
arms came when the United States de
clared war upon Germany, Raymond
enlisted in Battery F 114th Field Ar
tillery;, and in this outfit served
throughout the war.
While in tho service of his country
ho contracted the dread disease, and
upon his return to America from
France, where he served for eleven
months, he was sent to the govern
ment hospital at Otecfh.
The body is expected to arrivo in
Columbia at 9; 50 o'clock Wednesday
morning and will be carried directly
to, the parlors of the "Maury Under
taking Company where it will re
main until the hour of the funeral,
which wilK be conducted at the First
Christian Chjurch with full military
honors at 2:30 o'clock Wednesday aft
ernoon. ' " '
A military escort will accompany
the body to, the grave, and a firing
squad will fire a volley over his grave
as the body is tenderly laid to sleep
beneath' in beautiful Rose Hill ceme
tery. '' ' ; ' ' " '
.,- The young" nbldier is survived; by
his foster parents, Mr. and Mrs. 'A.
Z. Hughes, who are now at Avon
Park, Fla., and one sister, Mrs. How
ard Stubblefield, of Nashville. ' '
PROSPECTS
(From Tuesday's Daily Herald.)
Lambs are going to be of excep
tionally lino quality and weight this
spring, said M. E. Allen, well known
buyer, discussing the situation this
morning. The winter has been mild
and pastures have kept fine all .the
time and the unusually early Bpring
has made an abundance of grass! And
clover upon which the Jambs will fat-
U'li. it is expected tWit he Iambs
will, for these reasons, mature earlier
than usual. While the siieep popula
tion of the county is not as Ihrge as -it
was a few years ago it has increased
in the past two or three years and
even nt the lower prices' which they
will command the lambs will bring
into the county many thousands of
dollars during the latter part of May
and the first of June.
' The wool crop is going to be good.
Tho fleeces are exceptionally heavy
but hero again tho price will make a
big cut into the income that will
come from this seorce. It Is not like
ly, from present indications, that the
price of wool will be over twenty
cents at shearing time. It may not be
even worth half th.1t price as surplus
wool stocks are unusually heavy.
FARM SURVEY OF
WOODROW SCHOOL
ORDERED BY CLDB
TO TAKE, ACCURATE CENSUS OF
EVERY FEATURE OF RURAL
LIFE AT EARLY DATE.
SCHOOLS WILL - COOPERATE
Largely. 'Attended Meeting of Organi
zation Held With Profs. Dean and
McLean and, Joe Frank Porter as
Speakers.'
(From Monday's Dally Herald.)
There will bo a complete farm sur
vey made of the Woodrow community
in the eighth district. Decision to
make this survey was reached at the
meeting of the community organiza
tion there on Friday night. The com
mittee to make the survey is compos
ed of Joo Frank Porter, "Mrs. Early
Moore and . Prof. A. E. McLean, the
county agent. Prof. Burcham, prin
cipal of the school, will co-operate
with tho committee in making the
survey.
This survey will ascertain the num
ber of owners and tenants on the
farms of the community; tho number
of farmers who have purebred live
stock and ' the kind, the number of
stock, the character of farming, the
acreage of the various crops. The sur
vey will' also'ascjerjain the number
of farmers, who have labor saving de
vices and homo conveniences. It will
be the .first survey of,; tho kind made
:n hie county' and it is expected that
other ceflnnuinity organizations will
follow: miit. 1 ; '
There was a large attendance at
the meeting of tho organization 'and
addresseB were made by President
Joe Frank Porter, District Agent Jas.
M. Dean and bounty Agent McLean.
Mr. Dean gave the club a full resume,
or outline of the work that should be
done by a community organization,
and farm problems were dlscuussed by
Porter and McLean. ' ' . .
Prof. Burcham, of the Woodrow
school endorsed the work of the organ
ization and pledged his hearty co-operation.
There was a fine musical
program rendered.
MILITARY
HONORS
ATTENDS FUNERAL
RAYMOND HUGHES, FORMER
MEMBER 114TH F. A., SLEEPS,
BENEATH NATIVE SOD.
The funeral of Raymond HugheiB,
young soldier who died in a. govern-,
ment hospital at Oteen, N. C was
conducted with full military honors
hero this afternoon.
At 2:15 o'clock tho funeral cortege
left the parlors of the Maury Under
taking Company for the Christian
church, where at 2:30 o'clock the fu
neral was conducted by Elder F. C.
Sowell. Former comrades in arms, in
full uniform, formed an escort from
the time the body left the funeral par
lors until taps was sounded by the bu
gler, as tho body was laid to rest in
Rose Hill cemetery. , . , .,
The following served as pall bear
ers: M. S. Shirley, W. P. Jackson,
Dillingham, Clyde McKee, Cow-
deli Shaw, Girard BroWnlow and . Sam
Rogers. ... . : ', ... ..,
Tho following composed, tho firing
squad: Bedford Cornwall, C. H. Ham
ison, Lexie Nicks, cjy , Gray, ,,Erwin
Voss, J. H. Batts, Arthur, Paul and J.
E. Tanner. . - , ; -'
In addition to the survivors reported
Tuesday; Mr. Hughes is survived by
his wife.
INCREASED ACREAGE
OF IRISH POTATOES
MANY ACRES OF TUBERS HAVE
ALREADY BEEN PLANTED IN
THIS COUNTY.
TOM flDTOOTE
'. OF PHESEHT.
AB01
11
M
SENDS SPECIAL MESSAGE TO LEG
ISLATURE WHEN IT COMVENES
TODAY AFTER RECESS.
PLEADS FOR SAVING MONEY
Sets Out Eight Methods In Which Rev
enue of State Can Be Conserved.
Favors Creation of Central Tax
' Commission.
(From Monday's Daily Herald.)
Spocial to The Herald.
NASHVILLE, Tenn., March 7. Tho
abolition of tho back tax system is
advocated by Governor Alt Taylor to
day in a special message to the gener
al assembly upon its reconvening
after a three week's recess. He was
brief in his opinion on the matter, but
sufficiently clear as to be understood
as uncompromisingly against the pres
ent system and its attendant evils.
Governor Taylor said that the legis
lature Bhould "wipe out the abomina
ble back tax system now. in vogue to
plague us," and avocatcd putting the
collection of delinquent taxes In the
hands of county officials under the su
pervision of tho central tax commis
sion. . ; ,. v ;, ' . . :
Governor Taylor's message offered
suggeslons as to the best methods for
deriving more stato revenue and sav
ing money In the operation of tho state
government. s: vis '
He suggested eight nichods by which
money can be saved to the state. He
urged the creatioai of a central tax
commission as outlined in his first
message to the legislaure, favored the
cutting of the railroad commission to
one member, highway commission in
a like manner and asked that the state
police be elimhftd. He advocated
making the stale Vood and drugs de
partment a bureaffl of the health de
partments the fire prevention depart
ment a bureau of the insurance de
partment, and combining the horticul
ural (a,ctly (ties, with that of. the divi
sion of entomology. ;under he agricul
tural department... He ; said that all
allied departments and bureaus should
be .co-ordinated, i c -v. i,
He urged that there be the "followi
lng depatmente: . ': , i
Education. m ..... .i . ,
) Agriculture, ,lls,. -..
S Insurance. to n .ia- - .
Health. ',,,. .. v . , -
' Prison.: ;. ,.. ; .'. , , ; . , .
' (Charitable instluloiis. , , t v ,;
Labor, ,,.,..' . .
1 Geology,. , .. .i. .. ., w . ,
' ! Fore6ry , t , ,,,,, . . -
5 Each ,depa.rtmcnt:- should have .- an
executive head in, tho person of a sec
retary who should be under the super
vision, of tho governor to whom he
should make all reports.
LARGE CROWDS HERE
FOR FIRST MONDAY
USUAL QUOTA FF?OM THIS AND
. ADJOINING COUNTIES MADE
THINGS LIVELY. ,,'
Um TM- SYSTEM
Education Board Demands
Annexation Issue Settled
Without Further Delays
; J From Monday's Dally Herald.)
Insisting tho delay in settling the
annexation issue on tho part of the
Maury county legislative delegation is
ambarrassing the whole building pro
grain of the school board, the county
board of education this morning un
animously adopted a , resolution' by
Senator Clarke demanding that the
members of the legislature from this
county, immediately announce a de
ciison one way or the other on this
important question.
The county board of education dis
claims any desire to bo a party in any
wa to the controversy and it dis
tinctly states that t,he board expresses
no'Vpinion as to the merits of anne
xation, but it does insist " that tho
Senator and Representatives state at
once what they intend to do with
tho matter. The delay in settling the
issle is embarrassing the board. No
bonds tan be issued or sold until after
the McDowell school issueu in finally
disposed of, and in the meantime the
citizens of Spring Hill, and other por
tions of the thii'd and fourth districts
have advanced money for school re
paids and .school buildings in the ex
pectation of being reimbursed by "the
county out of the proceeds of tjie
bond issue. They havo carried these
debts now for several months and in
some cagos suits are being threatened
pyj laborers and matrialliien: '
But this is not all, the materials
are ou tho ground to begin the school
at Culleoka. Mt. Pleasant wants to
go to work immediately on additions
that aro badly needed, but nothing can
be done until after the bonds are is
sued and sold. Delegations from sev
eral schools wero before tho board ut
the meting this morning insisting
that action be taken at once so that
the building program could be car
ried forward.
All that the board desires Is a state
ment from the legislative dclcgaiion
that the annexation bill will or will
not be passed. The board can then
fiiake its;plans and proceed with the
long ,'dejajj ed program of school im
provement. '"
FEWER TENANTS
IN COUNTY THAN
REPORTED 1 9 1 0
PROPORTION OF FARMS OPERAT
ED BY THE OWNERS SHOWS
SMALL GAIN IN DECADE.
, (From Monday's Daily, Herald.).
There are .not bo many mules hero
today but the people tame to town
in large' numbem desp-teheii.ne f arm-i
lng weatnor. 4 wpii ,oiyy. ,w.a. every;
section of the county represented by
a WgaeteFatiobJC thoiw.eVe the
usual, cohtrlbutioiisj to the crowds
from the adjoining counties. Hxkman
county was especially represented
thGre' being many farmers here from
Shady Grove to Centreville.
Business generalty was lively and
many of the stores reported that
trade was satisfactory.
(From Monday's Daily Herald.) 1
There will be a big increase in the
acreage of Irish potatoes planted In
the county this Bpring as compared
with that for several years past. Few
large crops will bo planted but near
ly every farmer Is planting a few
more than he will need for family
use. The impression neems to pre
vail that the crop will bring a good
price and as the seed are not bo ex
pensive as they havo been In recent
years the farmers have decided to try
from half an acre v to three or four
acrps. i Many of Hip uotntoes are al
ready in the ground, the weather last
week having Been very favorable for
the preparation of Iho ground.
Several yp;irs ago Maury county
was a b'g potato county but in recent
years tho yield has dropped very ma
terially. Formerly the crop was ship
ped by the car load.
Mrs. T. B. Hendley and little son, Ed
Hendley, Jr., arrived Friday after
noon and will be the guests of Colum
bia relatives for several weeks.
EXHIBIT OF NEGRO
RURAL SCHOOLS
(From Monday's Daily Herald.)
Negro public schools of Maury coun
ty will hold their annual exhibit on
next Saturday at tho Odd Fellows
hall on Eighth street and the public
is cordially invited to attend. The
progrem will bo at 11 o'clock with
addresses by Prof. W. J. Hale, presi
dent of the Middle Tennessee (color
ed) Agricultural and Industrial Nor
mal School. Trof. Hale Is one of the
best speakers of his race in the South.
M. L. Barr, homo demonstration agent,
of Pulaski, will also make an address.
Another address will be delivered by
Prof. O. H. Bernard, supervisor of the
negro rural schools of Tennessee.
The exhibits will be arranged uuder
the direction of Stella L. Howse, the
county supervisor of. colored schools.
These exhibits arc held annually
here land they have been a source of
great Interest to the white as well aa
the negro population. They give evi
idence of the great progress that the
negro children are making in indus
trial education.
ONLY SINGLE FOREIGN TENANT
Others Are All Either Native White
, oji Colored, Former Being About
Three Times As Numerous As the
i titter Other Facts.
, -3vv 1
Ifom Wednesday's Daily Herald.)
' ' ntfekty Jo jih'rteneIitiniireBsiDn'
the;Q .was , actually. 9. .decrease. in ten
ants in, s Maury county w between, the
time! cJUatytfg tie slqnsusirt .9107anfl
that'll ,lf2().'.! Him Pa& Star's "eeil
sus jjhere , were rl35i, tenant, farmers
tcpprtM i ;ia 'tifat? iiititMiWsp'cr-
ati4. C6.'J'poivcojif,bf idii tie farms of
the county. In 1910 there were ten
ants operating 1,553 farms, showing
that 199 fewer farms worts' operated by
renters 1n 1920 than ten years previ
ously. - , -
There was a reduction also in the
number of farms in the county operat
ed by owners because there are 300
less farms in tho county than there
were ten years ago, duo to tho in
creased acreage of farms a tendency
that is general over the country. In
190 there were 2,C48 farms operated
by their owners; ten years before
there were 2,458 operated by their
owneis in the county.
1 Sixty -three per cent of the farms
of the county were operated by own
ers. There were twentyix farms
In tho county last year operated by
managers or tw oloss than the num
ber, operated ten years before. The
various kinds of tenants in the county
aro designated by the census as fol
lows: Shard tenants, 704; croppors,
J18; share cash. tenants; 34;" cash' ten
ants, 21C; unspecified renters, 51.
Thore were 1,008 native white tenants
in the county; .one foreign born white
tenant, and 343 negro tenants. Farms
operated by the tenants had a value
in land and buildings of $7,340,441.
Farms operated by the owners had a
value in land and buildings of $18,
S5G,3G0. Farms operated by manag
ers in the county had a value in land
and buildings of $905,300.
ELECTION ROAD
CHIEF AT APRIL
TERM DISCUSSED
PRESENCE HERE OF FRANK A.
BUTLER CAUSES BOOM , ON
PART OF HIS FRIENDS.
WILKES HAS SUPPORTERS TOO
One or Two Others Are Being Men
tioned In Connection With the
Place and Size of Salary Is Also
UveTopiM V. -aK '.,, 'V
CULLEOKA CRUSHES
LAWREflOEBURG TEAM
MAURY COUNTY ,LASSIES TAKE
GAME BY ONE-SIDED SCORE
THIRTEEN TO FOUR.
(From Saturday's Daily "Herald)
Culleoka's basketball team on- Fri
day administered a crushing defeat
to the Lawrenceburg school. The
score was thirteen to four, but that
alone does not tell the wholo story of
tho excellent playing of the Culleika
lassies. Every member of tho team
starred and soon after play started the
superiority of tho visitors over the
home team was demonstrated. They
have been ably coached by Mrs. Grace
Wilkes Martin, nho is naturally very
proud of her achievements.
The lineup of the Culleoka team
follows: Forwards. Little Foster and
Ernestine Osvorne; center, Alva HolL
and guards, Grace McKibbon and Ruth
Graves.
A game with the team of the Colum
bia High School at an early date is not
Improbable.
, J From, Wednesday's Daily Herald.) J
. v no wjh oe uie nrst superintendent
of roads under-the new law? That Is
a question that 4s engaging a good
deal of attitJjn 'arid tjlio presence
hero Moridajrof Frlnk A! 'Butfcr,' for
mer .superintendent under tho old system-
gave( rjsei to tho report that he
would be entered1 as a candidate by his
friends before the April session of the
court.; - It Is said ' that Mr. Butler,
while not an activo candidate, would
accept the place if tho court fixes the
compensation at a figure where he
feels that he would be justified in so
doing.
There are a number of tho members
3t tho court who hold Mr. Butler in
very high esteem and believe that he
would be better qualified than any oth
er engineer by reason of his long ex
perience with the roads of the county
and his familiarity with conditions
here. On the other hand there aro
several justices who think highly of
tho. work, and qualifications of the
present superintendent, F. Burke
Wilkes, and who are advocating his re
tention by tho county court. Although
ho has had little opportunity to show
what he can do Mr. Wilkes has made a
decidedly favorable impression on the
public since he first took charge of
the roads. , , , ...
1 It is argued in behalf of Mr., Wilkes
that ho could bo obtained for a., very
much less salary than the county
could secure the services of a gradu
ate civil engineer and that for all
practical purposes he would be just
as satisfactory. On the other hand It
is insisted that he could not qualify
under tho provisions of the act, but
this is answered by the contention
that the county coii'rt is lu fact made
tho judge of tho qualifications and if
tho court elects no one will challengo
its action.
In addition to the two mentioned
above the names of one or two other j
road experts have been connected
witTTttieottlcocT
wise, the question of the salary to be
paid that official is the subject of con-'
slderable. discussion. Whilo tho court
has the authority to fix tho salary up.
to $3,500 with all expenses, there are,
several members of the court who
will insist that the compensation bear
some relation to that provided for oth
er salaried officials of the county, like
the county judge and county superin
tendent of public instruction. There
will likely be quito a discussion of
tho proposed salary when the question
comes up at the April term.
BELL TEIEPHONE
IN COUNCIL ROOMS
i . ',r
COUNTY AGENT AGRICULTU
RAL SECRETARY MAY NOW BE
; REACH ED' (BYjPOTHi PH(bNESv ''
(From; Ttie8il'!ii)y jflferald.)
At last' the county 'council of agri
culture has a Bell telephone. The
county court ordered "tHi's phone plac
ed in the council at the Jdhuary'tCfm
but bocauso of the scarcity or phones
the company was untfblo to furnish
ono. However,' a phone has been'ee- .
cured and it was installed todav And
given mo numoer is. tieroaucr wnen
citizens of the county who have the
Bell telephone want to call tho agent
or get any information from the coun
ty council they should simply call Bell
phono 189. Thl will bo a very groat
convenience to tho farmors of the
county many of whom havo only the
B611 telephone. The council has had
a Citizens phone for several months. '
Back Tax Probe
Continues Today;
Serious Charges
1 .; -x .. i ; , '"' '
' (From 'Tuesday's Dally Herald.)
Special to The Herald.
NASHVILLE, Tenn., March 8. The
comptroller should fire Roy Johnston,
back tax attorney for the .revenue
agent in East Tennessee and employ
counsel to recover, from Johnston,
Judge (!. M. Trotter, of Knoxvillc, told
tho Durham back yx ,.. investigating
committee today. ' "
Judge Trotter told of some of John
ston's work in East . TennoBaee. and
said he had never furnished reports
on his operations.
Herald Cheap Column Ada Pay.
Why Your City Is J
Prosperous
to live in itX
A PROSPEROUS town is a mighty good place
means sure growth.
But with growth there will come also the greater business oppor
tunities and the need for additional money In vonr ' himltiAna
Now is tho time to make your banking connection- ulay extra &
safe and choose a Member Bank of the Federal Reserve System.
I Maury National 0ank
jjj Columbia, Tenn. &

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