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The Columbia herald. [volume] (Columbia, Tenn.) 18??-1935, November 18, 1921, Image 2

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PAGE TWO
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THE COLUMBIA HERALD FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1921 .u
BETTER SERVICE
MEETING IS HELD
BY RAILROADERS
OFFICIALS AND WORKERS GATH
ER IN BIG GET TOGETHER
MEETING HERE.
PLEA FOR' CLOSE CO-OPERATION
Worker Apparently In Heartiest SynV
pathy With Movement for Better
Service to Both General Public and
to the Railroads.
(From' Wednesday's Dally -Herald.)
In the interest of "Better Service,"
both to the public and to the railroad,
a big "get together meeting" and
Bmoker of railroad managers and em
ployes was held last night in the gen
eral waiting room of the union sta
tion. The meeting, which lasted from
7 until 9:40 o'clock p. m., was attend
ed by about 100 managers and repre
sentative employes of this division,
reaching between Nashvile and Ath
ens, Ala.
Among those in attendance were E.
A. Defuniack, general freight agent of
the Louisville & Nashville; H. T. Live
ly, general claim agent; J. R. Wheeler,
superintendent of this division; A. W.
Brant, assistant superintendent; C. J.
Trantham, assistant master of trains,
and N. H. Lackney, chief dispatcher,
and trainmen, agents and representa
tives of all classes from over the divi
sion.
The meeting was one of a series ol
similar meetings being held on all
American railroads for th3 purpose of
establishing close relationship be
tween the management of the roads
and the employes. The officials plead
ed for the heartiest co-operation of
the boys who make it possible to op
erate the roads. They declared that
only in this w,ay could efficiency be
improved, and better service given the
public. They pleaded for a long hard
"pull together" as the roads emerge
from one of the most trying situations
in the history of American railroads.
Representatives from Nashville and
other points left on a special train for
their homes shortly after the meeting
was adjourned, while Southern repre
sentatives left on the Montgomery
train which passes here at 1053
o'clock.
DR. MAV FIELD 10
LECTURE ON BIRDS
VANDERBILT PROFESSOR TO BE
HEARD AT HIGH SCHOOL ON
NEXT SATURDAY.
Dr. George R. Mayfleld, of Vander
bilt University, will deliver his well
known bird lecture at the County High
School on Saturday evening. Dr. May
fleld has long been a student of bird
life and his lecture is very interest
ing. He is coming to Columbia under
the auspices of the Highland Park Wo
man's Club.
FIRST COMMUNITY
MEETING AT NEW
HARRIS SCHOOL
PUPILS AND PEOPLE OF THAT
SECTION TO ASSEMBLE NEXT
SATURDAY AFTERNOON.
MAKING PROGRESS ON BUILDING
Robert Willis, of Mt. Pleasant, Who
Built the New House at Cross Bridg
es, Is In Charge of Construction.
Frame Work Going Up.
(From Wednesday's Daily Herald.)
People of the Bigbyville and Mc
Cains communfties will come togeth
er on next Saturday for their first
community meeting at the Harris High
School, tho magnificent new $25,000
building that is being erected as a con
solidation of the two schools. On the
athletic field of this school a big com
munity meeting will be held at 1
o'clock. There will be games for the
school children and also for the grown
ups and parents. It is hoped to have
every pupil of the two "schools and ev.
er citizen of that section of the coun
ty present to enjoy a general get to
gether assembly, the first to be held
in the new grounds. , '
Work is now progressing rapidly
on the new school, which, it is ex
pected will be completed early next
year. The foundation has been finish
ed and the wood work is being rapid
ly put together. Nearly all of the
brick has been placed on the ground
and it is probable that within a short
time the wort of laying the brick will
commence. The structure is to be of
brick vaneer and it will be one of the
most complete school plants in the
state. , '
Robert Willis, of Mt. Pleasant, who
has just completed the new building
at Cros3 Bridges, is superintendent of
construction, and he is pressing the
work as rapidly as the weather condi
tions will permit.
It is planned by the citizens of that
section to have a big celebration at an
early date to which the general public
will be invited. It has not yet been
decided whether this will take place
at the laying of the corner stone or
whether they will wait until the build
ing is finished and then have it dedi
cated with . appropriate ceremonies.
BATE BOND IS'
VICTIM OF DEATH
MEMBER OF STATE ELECTION
EOARD STRICKEN WITH ACUTE
INDIGESTION TODAY.
(From Thursday's Daily Herald.)
Special to The Herald.
NASHVILLE, Tenn., Noy. 10. Bate
Bond, member of state election board,
died suddenly of acute indigestion at
his home at Brownsville today. He
wa.s a son of Judge John R. Botid and
a brother of W. W. Bond, speaker of
the senate.
DR. O.J. PORTER;
HEADS LEGION
FOR NEXT YEAR
PHYSICIAN CAPTAIN CHOSEN
COMMANDER OF LOCAL POST
' AT ANNUAL MEETING.
I
PRESTON GANT IS ADJUSTANT
More THan 250 ExServlce Men Enjoy
ed the Big Feast on Armistice Day
at the Watson Camp on Duck Riv
er The New Officers'.
(From Sunday's Daily Herald.)
Dr. Otey J. Porter was unanimously
elected commander of the Herbert
Griffin Post of the American Legion at
the anual meeting held on Armistice
Day. Dr. Porter served as captain and
surgeon with the medical corps of
the American army during the war.
He was one of the first to volunteer
from' Maury county and has always
manifested a lively interest in the wel
fare of the ex-service men.
Sergeant Walker, of Williamsport,
was-elected vice commander and Pres
ton" Gant, of Columbia, was elected
adjutant.' Both served their country
during the wgrld Avar with credit. It
is believed that with this splendid or
ganization the Legion will go forward
to the achievement of greater suc
cess than hus yet crowned its efforts.
There was a large attendance of the
ex-service men at Watson's camp for
the annual meeting. An actual count
showed about 250 present or more
than there are members of the Le
gion. While all of the ex-service men
enjoyed the barbecue of course only
the members of the Legion participat
ed in the election of the officers for
the coming year.
The time for the payment of dues
will end on January 1 and it is expect
ed that some kind of a drive will have
to be conducted at that time to get
soirie of the members, to renew. This
was necessary last year and was so
successful that something of the kind
may again be attempted.
DEAN WILL ATTEND
BIG HARVEST DINNER
GOES TO CLARKSVILLE TONIGHT
TO ENJOY FEAST BIG CELE
BRATION OF SUCCESS.
(From Tuesday's Daily Herald.)
District Agent J. M. Dean left to
day for Clarksville where he will at
tend the big Harvest Dinner, which
is one of the biggest stunts the live
wire citizens of Montgomery, county
have ever pulled oft. Montgomery is
rejoicing over the splendid showing at
the big state fair when she got away
with the first prize for the best county
exhibit and over the splendid suc
cess of the county exhibits.
Mrs. David Castleman and little ba
by, of New York City, are here for a
visit to Mrs. Castleman's sister, Mrs.
Ernest Cruikshank, at the Columbia
Institute.
1Z
f
We Give Trade Week Coupons
Pay Your Subscription Account On
V
The Daily IHIeirald
and on
The WeeKly Herald
hi
or on
WW
Yntir
Ledger Account
And get these Trade Week Coupons. We give
them on every dollar spent with us during this
Trade-ln-Columbia-Week
Columbia Herald Co.
H an n n
mors mm
mmmmy
mi
Following thei first Democratic primary for county
officers in February 1910 Claude Godwin who was then
the leader, but who ran 340 votes behind the leader in the
recent primary issued the following appeal to the voters
of Rfiaury county, on February 10, 1910:
To' The
oralis (M
lamry
Cra
May
You nominated me LEADER in the first PRIMARY by a
majority of over 400 votes over my present OPPONENT. I beg
you next Saturday to remember the DEMOCRATIC CUSTOM
The Democratic precedent has always stood by the MAN WHO
GETS THE LARGEST NUMBER OF VOTES. I NEVER
SCRATCHED THE DEMOCRATIC TICKET in my life. I
have always been LOYAL to the time honored Democracy of the
Leader being the NOMINEE. I believe you will stand to the
Democratic custom. Then you will be a great FACTOR in dis
pelling FACTIONS AND SCHISMS in the Democracy of Maury,
county. . The keynote of Democracy is, UNITED WE STAND,
DIVIDED, we fall.
My heart swells with love for what you have done for me
and with the highest degree of gratitude prompts me to say that
all my endeavors and energy will be used to so conduct the
Sheriff's office that.no man shall live to regret having given me
his support.
- . - - i
I beseech every friend who voted for me and every Demo
crat, whether they voted for me or my opponents, to vote for
me next Saturday. ,
I have no ill feelings toward anyone but claim the custom to
appeal to all Democrats to stand by mc next Saturday, Feb. 12.
With gratitude to all.
CI
ante
Mi WDM
MBBB&
In the recent Primary I received substantially the
SAME PROPORTION OF THE VOTES that Godwin re
ceived in the primary in I9IO.
MY MAJORITY OVER GODWIN IS OVER 340 Votes.
Ol-
W0BD
. Leading Candidate for Sheriff
iuiiwmwwiumi3 Cm
HOPE TO RETAIN
MAIL DELIVERY
FROM LEWISBURG
BELIEVER THAT SUSPENSION OR
DER MEANS RETENTION OF
THE SERVICE.
BRINGS THE MAIL HOURS EARLIER
Schedules Have Been Remarkably
. Maintained Since the Service Was
Started All Depends on the Report
of Inspectors.
(From Wednesday's Daily Herald.)
. With the suspension of the order
for the discontinuance of the star
j truck routes from Lewisburg to Co
( lumbia and from Columbia to Mt.
j Pleasant and Lawrenceburg it is be
I lieved that there is a good prospect
j for the continued operations of these
! routes, . . '
When the order was issued tor the
discontinuance of these route3 Kepre
j sentative Lemuel P. Padgett, of this
i district immediately got busy. He at
I once went to the ofBffice of the sec
ond assistant postmaster general and
protested that to undoovhai bail been
done In this 'terrHr rirthe prompt
delivery of mail wul j be & great in
justice. So earnest was Mr. Padgett
and so convincing his arguments that
he finally prevailed on the department
to suspend the order and give time
for an investigation. This was done.
It is expected that the inspectors
will at once make a thorough investi
gation of the routes. Final action will
depend altogether upon the report
that they make. The star service
from Lewisburg serves a great many
offices and routes and patrons. Leav
ing Lewisburg on the arrival of train
No. 1 from Nashville and the North
this route serves Culleoka and its
five rural routes and Columbia and the
ten routes out from here. The mail
is then sent to Hickman county and
to Lawrence county and by traiji con
nections other patrons of the post
offlce are served.
The early morning mail from Nash
ville and the north is brought into Co
lumbia more than two hours earlies
than would bo the case if the route
w as no in operation. From a stand
poinfof maintaining schedules the ser
vice has been remarwabiy good. Only
on a comparatively few occasions has
the truck been very late in arriving
here and it is usually right on time.
The trucks have hauled a good many
passengers and have in that way been
of service to the public.
It is understood that the order is
sued for the discontinuance of the ser
vice was in line with the policy .of
economy that Postmaster General
Hays has inaugurated. Nevertheless
he has stated that there would be no j
economies that would interfere with
the prompt and efficient delivery of
the mails.
Si
1
I
Berry Growers
Of Culleoka To
Meet Saturday
(From Monday's Daily Herald.)
It is indicated that tho meeing of
the melon and berry growers to be
held at the store roojn of the Culleoka
Produce Company next Saturday after
noon will l)e largely attended. The
meeting will bo held for the purpose
of ascertaining whether or not there
Is sufficient interest in berry growing
to orgauize a Strawberry Association.
In the. event farmers will agree to
plant as much as fifty acre3 In berries
the association will be formed, but if
this amount cannot be secured it is be
lieved that the project will be aban
doned. It is al.;o planned to discuss the can
taloupe prospect for 1922, and in the
event the cantaloupe growers decide
to plant good crops next spring the
organization will anticipate its needs
and will order supplies accordingly.
STORAGE AND ICE
PLANT AT LEWISBURG
COCHRAN & BEASLEY, OF COLUM
BIA PRODUCE CO., HAVE
CLOSED CONTRACTS.
(From Monday's Daily Herald )
W. S. Ueasley, secretary and truac
urer of the Columbia Produce Co.. f
this city, gave out the statement that
he and his associate, A. M. Cochran,
of Nashville, president of tho Colum
bia Produce Co., have commenced tli'
orection of a twenty ton Ice fad my
at Lewisburg.
The plant will be located on t!:
Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Iwmi
railroad, and in addition to havint' :i
capacity of twenty tons of ice per day.
the p'ant will be equipped with tli i
large cold storage rooms, giving il '
city of Lewisburg ample storage room.
Already contracts for the buil'lin-'
has been awarded and work will In . in
in a few days. The building is t
of brick and concrete, "with all t'
latest ice manufacturing machiii ry.
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Catinna mortor-
ed, through from their home In Ijuis-
Till?,-Kr.. to spf-nd the week with rel
atives in Maury county.
Emil Telmanyf, noted Hungarian
violinist, and his accompanist Sai la
Vas arrived last night and during bis
stay in the city will be the pust
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas II. William
Mr. Williams wet Mr. Ttirnanyi dur
ing his recoct stay in Doamsuk.

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