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The Labor herald. (Richmond, Va.) 1885-18??, June 26, 1886, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96096625/1886-06-26/ed-1/seq-4/

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und Views of the Knights of Labor.
A notable feature about the resolu- j
ins adopted by the General Assembly |
the Knights of Labor at Cleveland
the way in which they deal with the
iderlying causes of the impoverish
ent of labor. There was a time, and
was not so long ago, when working
en only thought of dealing with such
lestions as the increase of wages and
ie reduction of the hours of labor,
essening the hours of labor and in
casing the rates of wages are very
>od things in themselves. Long hours
id poor pay are, however, effects of
.uses which must be removed if wage
orkers are ever to secure a permanent
iprovement in their condition.
The stand the General Assembly of
ie Knights oi Labor has taken on the
nd and money questions shows that
orkingmej are beginning to perceive
tat if they would better their condi
oii they will have to do something
ore than pursue the old trades-union j
}licy of fighting the bosses This is
convincing evidence of the growth of
itelligence in the ranks of labor. A
ttle reflection ought to convince every
itelligent workingman thai the rate of
ages, in the last analysis, is not de
jrmined by either the union to which
c may belong or by the employer.
here are general causes always at
ew- ,
The
divert
ng attention from these causes by
larping upon the law of supply and
lemand.
The capitalistic press state a self
ivident truth when they assert that if
he labor market is overcrowded it is
mpossible for the wage worker to ex
>ect the same compensation for his la
>or that he received when there were
mt few seeking employment and when
is a consequence there was no compe
ition. Every workingman knows from
lis personal experience that the law of
mpply and demand is a powerful factor
n determining the money value of his
abor. When there are fewer in the
rade there is a better chance of the in
lividual worker obtaining higher wages.
?or tnis reason some trades have sys
tematically gone to work to limit their
lumbers. The workings of the law of
mpply and demand are forcibly illus
trated in the difference between the
vages of skilled and unskilled labor.
.t requires little else than bodily
itrength to handle a pick and shovel
uid consequently there are always a
*reat number ready to engage in that
rind of work. The result is that the men
vho work with the pick and shovel re
:eiv« but small wages as compared with
;he wages of skilled mechanics. The
lemand for the former can be much
nore easily supplied than the demand
'or the latter. It is this that deter
nines the difference in wages.
It will be seen, then, that anything
that affects the law of supply and de
mand in the labor market, affects the
rate of wages. It is hardly neces
sary to say that no one will work for
mother for small wages when he has a
jhance of doing better by becoming his
Dwn employer. Now, if the land was
not monopolized by a few, the number
Df these self employers would be great
ly increased, with the result that the
labor market would cease to be over
crowded, which would have the effect
of raising the standard of wages.
It was a wise thing, then, for the
General Assembly of the Knights oi
Labor to give such prominence to the
land question in the resolutions adoptee
by it For many years the public landi
have been passing out of the possessioi
of the people. In a few years mon
there will be nothing left of the nation')
magnificent heritage if land-stealing
continues. It does not require th<
gift of prophecy to foretell what effec
the monopolization of what remains o
the public lands by land thieves woulc
have on labor. The competition in thi
ranks of labor would become every da;
more intense, and as a consequent
wages would go down until the pom
would be reached when starved labo
would break out in open revolt Thei
would follow a species of civil war tha
could not continue for any length o
time without endangering the ver
foundations of the Republic. The nios
powerful of the labor organizations c
the country has raised its voice agains
the spoliation of the people's land no
a moment too soon.
The currency is another question ii
which the wage worker is personal!
interested. The Knights in callini
to take from th
pfcr of if sum:
■■BFvery wisethiiig. As th
purchasing power of money is deter
mined by the amount of it in circula
tion it is not right that corporation
should have the power of inflating o
contracting the volume of currency a
their greed dictates. "The right ti
issue or coin money," to quote the pc
tition sent by the Knights to Congress
" is a high sovereign prerogative whicl
ought not to be exercised by any bu
the highest power in the nation, an<
we view with alarm the exercise of sucl
prerogative by private persons or coi
porations." As the market price o
property and labor decreases in pre
portion as the amount of money in cii
•ulation decreases, it will be seen tha
every wage worker is interested in hay
ing the currency properly regulated
The resolutions adopted by the Gen
eral Assembly of the Knights of Labo
show that workingmen are taking :
more intelligent and a more compre
hensive view of the labor question thai
they ever did before. This is a cheei
rag sign of progress, and encourage
the hope that the labor question wii
be satisfactorily settled in the near ft
ture.— lrish World.
— m' . .
Ask for the K. of L. Co operativ
Soap and take no other.
Land Grants to Railroads.
In some instances these roads have
been partially constructed, in others
no attempt has been made to build,
yet in all cases the entire grant is (
claimed, and the lands thus covered
are withheld from settlement. The
Supreme Court of the United States
having decided that "a failure to com
plete the road within the time fixed in
the grant does not forfeit the giant,"
the land thus withheld must remain so
until by act of Congress the respective '•
unearned grants are declared forfeited.
It has been truly affirmed "that title to
nearly 100,000,000 acres of land, right
fully belonging to the people of this j
country, is in such a condition that it
may, by crafty entanglement of law, be
confirmed in the interest of grasping
and corporate monopolies; yet Con
gress remains passive, refusing to
assert the rights of the people, although
well advised of the imperative necessity
for action.
A fair illustration that the govern
ment is or has been in danger of losing
these lands is the case of the ''Back
bone" grant, made in 1871 to the New
Orleans, Vicksburg and Baton Rouge
railroad. One of the conditions of the
grant was that the road should be com
pleted in five years. Not a yard of
earth was ever moved by tbis company.
then transferred the grapTir ■#& New!
Orleans and Pacific road, w hV-h mm
pany sold its charter rights to foe
Texas Pacific, reserving its assigned
grant, and transferring it to the Amer
ican Improvement Company. The
"Backboners" have repeatedly impor
tuned Congress for confirmation, always
meeting with refusal. The culmina
tion of this affair shows how great the
power and how little the care exercised
by high officials in disposing of or pro
tecting the public lands. During the
last weeks of the retiring administration
there was great and unusual animation
noticeable in the general land" depart
ment. Extra clerks were t'jtsy night
and day filling out papers precipi
tous haste; and when the present Sec
retary assumed control of the office
the mill was still in full blast grinding
out what proved to be patent: for lands
of this "Backbone," 70,000 acres oi
which were already deeded, c rery revo
lution of the wheels severing from the
public domain, without adequate if any
compensation, great tracts [of land
The machinery was ordered stopped,
saving to the government tkoii-ands ol
acres, and inaugurating, it is to be
hoped, a new era in the methods oi
disposing of that portion of our public
domain which still remains.
The wanton and wholesale plundei
of our public lands for the past twenty
years furnishes material for the mosl
astounding chapter of American his
tory. In what terms may we fitlj
characterize a system which permits
one man, by questionable methods, tc
secure a grant of lands cohering £
narrow strip extending for miles along:
the banks of a large streaawrith al
tributaries, comprising in itself a smal
acreage, but rendering inaccessible tc
others, and depriving the govemmem
[I of the sale of millions of acres of thi
adjacent lands (a notable instance o
this kind occuring in New Mexico) —l
system which winks at the building o
fences by cattle kings around vass areas
excluding therefrom the honest 3ettler
putting up in effect a barrier to thi
' progress of civilization, and which en
ables railroad corporations, after re
| ceiving patents to over 10,000,000 acree
still to set up, with fair prospect o
success, claims for 2,000,000 more?—
Harper s Magazine.
' BOYCOTT BAUGHMAN BrtOS.
i Richmond, Va., April 15,-1884. '
t I take this method of informing m;
t friends that B. F. Durvin's PJe Cur
can now be found at all reliab.e drug
gists in the city of Richmond.
b Hoping that my afflicted friends wii
j excuse me for introducing my Salv
B through this channel, in preference i
, following a circus with it, and whil
admitting that it is not the greates
r Salve on earth, I still point with prid
a to the many cures it has effected anion]
t my acquaintances in cases of Burnt
,f Cuts, Boils, Corns, and all complaint
where a good Salve was needed.
1 I remain, as of old, your friend,
t B. F. Dubvin.
t Machinery and Overproduction.
t Carroll D. Wright: In the productio
. of metals and metallic goods, long-ei
Q tablished firms testify that machiner
y has decreased manual labor 33J pc
y per cent. A great saving has bee
c made in the production of pig iro
* during the last half century, jPittsbnr
c producers placing the i pt
•- cent, over the simple country furnaci
r By the use of improvements and invei
b tions during the past ten or tiftee
r years in hammers used in the manufai
s ture of steel there has been a displaci
3 ment of employees in the proportio
i. of nearly 10 to 1. A first-class joui
l neyman can make from 600 to 1,00
b two-pound tin cans per day by ban
t process. By the use of machinery h
J can make from 2,000 to 2,500 per dai
~ In making lard pails, a machine is i
.. use by which one man, with one bo
f as a tender, can produce as much a
>_ was formerly produced by ten skille
I I workmen making a gross in about one
t j and a half days. By the use of in
. j proved machinery the workmen ca
|. now turn out five times as much pre
. ', duct in the same time. In the mam
r | facture of bread boxes, what was don
aI in 187G by thirteen men and wome
.. working together, is now accomplishe
a by three men. One boy, running a plai
•.; ing machine in turning wood work fc
g i musical instruments and material;
II does the-work of twenty-five men. I
i- the manufacture of sounding board
fifteen men can turn out 5,000 boarc
per month, or 278 per day, where
c j good man formerly could make by
1 four a day by the old method.
SYCLE BROS.
DRY GOODS AND FANCY GOODS.
311 BROAD STREET.
LOW PRICES FOR JUNE.
50 pieces of (rinkle Seersucker, it Be.
1 case of Check Muslin, at sc.
100 pieces of Pique, nice quality, only 3c. wa
Beat (.'rinkle Seersucker, at 12 j<. o
link and Blue Chambray at Be, worth 121 c.
50 pieces of Striped Seersucker, ir Gingham, at 7c, worth 12J.
Brown Chambray at OJe,, only <i few pieces left. ci
Gents' Gauze Shirts at 20c, worth 25.
Gents 1 Oaose Shirts at 25, 35 an I silc., with long or short sleeves.
The best 50c.Unlauudried Shirt in the city.
2 pair of the best Unbleached J Hose for 25c T
Good J Hose. :i pair for 50c, in unbleached or colored.
( asimere for Men and Boys' weir.
Large Stock of Mattings and Carpets.
Oil Cloth from 25c. to $1. '
Window Shades with spring rol er 10c complete.
White Spreads from 50c. to $6.:t1.
Bargains in Napkins, Table Liien, and Towels.
White India Linen from sc. to ?>c.
llatnburgs from Auction, very 1 w.
The best Dollar Black Silk in t\e city.
Summer Silks at a sacrifice.
Dress Goods from 5 to 75c. per yard.
If you want a Stylish Dress, kok at our ten cent Dress Goo*.
Bargains in Hosiery, Handkerdiiefs, Corsets, Glows, and many other (i Is we
cannot mention for want of space. •
OUR STORE CLOSES IT 6 P. M.
311 Broad Street, bet. Third and Fourth Streets.
CORNER SIXTa AMD BROAD STREETS. <^k
"ONLY CHEAP."
THIS IS THE BASIS OF OUR TVENTY-FIVE YEARS' REPUTATION
FOR THE DWEST PRICES.
Our Stocks were never before so complete and we have never before been so
' able to cater o your every want.
. DRESS GOODS jUNLAUNDRIED SHIRTS
in every -onceivable variety, from the ■ - J We show six different styles and quali
dinaiy products of Cotton Mills to \-e ties of unlaundried shirts, each on.' the
Finest Imported Fabrics. Our prices ie ! product of a different manufacturer—the
especially attractive. '■ advantage being in that each quality i- ■
special one for the price.
ILKS ' ~ v OUR <50c. SHIRT,
for which we have suet a wide reputati l . ... ... ,= , ma(le .
are an important item with us thisseaso,, «« P< Xd mal
gSillt P F are ! ton-hole worked and
colors, from 47Jc. up, Satin i OUR OOc. Sal-ilKl |
72 jc and up, Fancy Summer Silks 25c, 3c. guaranteed to be made of Wamsutta Mil-*-,
50c, and up. Plain and Fancy Velv*,s, '; I'm, and made anil finished as well as any'
Plushes and Satins, etc. 1 Dollar Shirt. Advertised by other firms
PARASOLS i® -,« » mBT
all Colors, Satin Coachings @ 88c. andjl, ] °, . , 7 SC '.. .*V .
Striped Satin Parasols @ *1.25, Eleg.nt ! a most desirable medium-priced article.
, Styles Blocked Tops @ $1.99, worth $310, Can hardly be distinguished from a regu-
Elegant and Handsome Styles and Deafens lar $1 shirt.
iin all grades. Large Stock of Umbrelis. | OUR NEW $1 SHIRT
' WASH DRESS GOODS! stamped Meyer's Dollar Shirt is now being
._ . _~ sold © 88c each, $5.25 for 0, for the pur
such as Ginghams, Scotch Zephyrs, Pain ge o{ j ntro d„eiutr
, and Crinkled Seersuckers, Prints, batns, _, t_>pt-a w r «htrt'
Foulards, Batistes, &c, in the handsomst HE . . t
c latest patterns. Then why not tke with an established reputation as the best
mtage of selecting from our exten've One Dollar Shirt made, $G for 6.
rtment and at our always spejal A most complete assortment of Gent t
jM-ices. Furnishings.
We guarantee a saving of iron 25 per cent to 33 per cent on Regular In
i stalment House Prices by buying ymr Carpets, Mattings, Oil Cloths, Window-
Shades, Lace Curtains, Poles, and louse Furnishings of us on our easy weekly
paying plan, JULIUS MEYIR & SON, 601 and GO3 Broad Street.
Mjrs. JANE KING,
t
Wholesale and Retail ,ealer in KENNEBEC KIVEB.
! No. 1.811 Cary St., Richmond, Va.
| CITY CUSTOMERS FURNTSILKIWUNCTU U.T.Y THROUGHOUT THE SEAI
[
SON. BEST KEXNSBEC ICE. TELEPHONE No. 210.
>
j E]%{Mlipi &OJME ENTERPRISE
I BY BUY NG YOUR ICE OF THE
rV:am:n-£»;i»3«J-r«:n-~t; I«»« C?€».«>
' Every dollar this Company rrperves for ICE is disbursed and put in circnla
1 tion in this City instead of heir? p.id away for Northern Ice and Freight. II
is for your interest to make th's mterprise a success. The Ice is perfect!j
pure being made of James Rive • w ter filtered and distilled.
f OFFICE COFI .ADAMS & CANAL STS.
Telephone 19G. < [ , E. F. SWAIN, Manager, j
ODENHEIMER
THE Ii ATTER I JBNTS FURNISHER
y LEADER LOW PRICES.
■ 525 E. Broad. St., \ - IRich-xncnd., "Vs.
Samuels $2.54 Calf Skin Shoes,
t IN BUHON, I ICE AND CONGRESS.
6 Sole agent for James Means fI.OUQaH Skin Shoe in Button, Lace and Coi
i, gress, the-oest in the world. i
* HONEST LABOR, MY OWN MJ.KE, HAND SEWED BROGANS, il
DUCE TO 1.50.
1437.!& 1439 Main St. I
o Anheuser-Busch
Brewing Associatioii.
ii Jm a\E ST " 3L,c:>xj;i:s - M °
' Hghest Premium Awarded Wherever Exhibited.
x '\ T^^SS^ S ' I7IBE.MAIN STREET >^M r^jEl^
>- RICHMOND VA. • '"In
REFRIGERATOR COR. UNICI iRACE STS. lnLj&*M
(1 -x.-*.... •■/
, r SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO FAMILY AND SHIPPING TRADE °— =^Zf~~
n ' INTENDING TO MAKE A CHANGE IN MY BUSINESS I SHAL
, OFFER FEOM JUNE 1 MY ENTIRE STOCK OF
18 DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, BOOTS, SHOES, &C.
AT PRICES THAT WILL MAKE THEM SELL.
Hi". HRAJIf 816 K. BROAD ST., (SwrtM Sh.«
TH E I
IE STORE,
T. E. O'KEEFFE,
119 E. Broad St.
HERMAN C. BOSCHEN,
Successor to
BO
OSCHEN & D ROTHER,
BO
OOTS, OhOES,
TQ
RUNKS, WATCHELS
507, 509, 511 BROAD ST.,
Richmond, Va.
GEORGE DUNCAN,
BOOTS, SHOES
AND
If DBBll Si
W W W B B-B.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
1717 E.lMain, Eichmond, Va.
Q O. D. Orders Promptly Filled.
-rSicHard. ~J*7"ag-ener,
MANUFACTURER OF
Fine Cigars
22 S. Fourteenth Street,
RICHMOND, - - VIRGINIA.
_?_.S7_: _ro_3
fageners Sigars,
I. OF L. OR BIG DICK,
Made by Union Men and K. of L.
$10 REWARL
will be paid for information that will lead
to the conviction of any person making
false and malicious statements calculated
or intended to injure the standing of tht
NATIONAL MUTUAL AID SOCIETY
OF VIRGINIA.
JAMES HUDSON, Manager
1329 E. MAIN ST., RICHMOND, VA.
AQENTB WANTED.
WANTED !
ALL TO KNOW THAT
TEIBBETT & TAYLOB
Wholesole Fancy
Grocers, Confection
»— era, and dealers in
Fruits, Tobacco, Ci
gars &c., No. 1316
Main St., Richmond,
Va., are agents for
JAMES I. HASH & CO.'S
Celebrated Cream Crackers, Fancy
Cakes and Preserves,
LARRABEE'S
Snow Flake Wafers and
A. GROSS & CO.'S CANDLES.
Agents for J. Wright & Co.'s Celebrate*
Brands of Tobacco—
Master Workman & Unknown KNiam
WANTED PURCHASERS FOR
Coal Coal Coal
Stove Anthracite, 2,000 lbs, $4.7
Nut and Egg, " " 14.5
Cumberland Smith, 2240 lbs, $4.5
WOOD—Long and Sawed—CHEAl
Ru. N. NORTHEN & C&,
1111 W. MARSHALL ST.,
B. Sc:b.-w-a,rz■berg•,
FIRST CLASS
Merchant i Tailos
1712 E. Broad St., bet. 17th & 18th,
Richmond, Va.
Dyeing, Cutting, Repairing and Clcanii)
done in the beat order.
FOUND!
Greo. J±. Hundlej
One square below his old stand, witb
full line of
GROCERIES & OLD WHISKETJ
F. B. ROBERTSON & BRO.,
Telephone 485. G22 East Broach
For Purest of
MALT LIQUORS
—USE
COMPANY'S
LAGER BEER.
EOBT. HILL, Jr.
MANAGER.
J. E. QUARLES,
MANUFACTURER and dealee in
CHILDREN'S CARRIAGE
OF ALL
STYLES AND GRADES.
SPECIAL ATTENTION TO REPAIRINI
310 N. Fifth St., Richmond, Va.
—'" - - — .. -1 .- ■
fllOn WOETH OF GOODS FOE $1 ftflft
yyU CASH AND $1 PEE WEEK. OUU
I SB f'Tfl haafiT
WE CALL YOUR ATTENTION TO OUR LARGE STOCK OF
FURNITURE, CARRETS, MATTINGS, STOVES, RE FRIG Ell
A TORS and BABY CARRIAGES.
Will sell you any of taw akewe gataal at the lowest prices either for CASH or on the
above LIBERIA!. TERMS.
Rotliert & Co.
505 E, BEOAD ST.
ASK YOUR GROCER FOR
EH /O <P\ !z{
( BEST J §
Manufactured by JOSEPH G. DILL,
MOO STKEET, I>, VA.
——^————______^_^___________-—_^—_ —_____—
ASK YOUR GROCER
_PO_3
KNIGHTS If LABOR
Co-operative
MANUFACTURED BY
K. OF L. CO-OPERATIVE CO
1505 FRANKLIN ST., RICHMOND, VA.
t THOMAS & BEO.'S
FAMOUS
K. of I. UNION MA BE
f. Sam, Jones, City Agent. FACTORY 903 E. BYRD ST. RICHMOND. VI
(W. H. PERKINS, Jr., & Co.
manufactuee.es of fine cigaes.
Factory No. 40.
union-made. 9 Grcjverxior street
incorporated list 1861.
Richmond Ice Company,
(Successors to A. G. BAB COCK.)
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN AND SHIPPERS OF
sJfs jSlsli JEW S --> Hit W Illii^
OFFICE AND DEPOT: BRANCH DEPOT:
Foot of 17th St., South Side of Dock, No. 007 East Marshall Street,
"ST-...
Telephone 223. A. D. LANDERKIN, Sup
THE ISEST!
> - tB " ''^*v» e \\ :Rts!ENT
O J UR ° RA m»"-P0iNT3j IND. IJJ -<
—< _! fILSJI -.- 7 , I; . E~^
<•*. im— —■_»» *>«»■».* j_ls£«>«_-*
1820-22-24 MAIN STREET, RICHMOND, VA.
G A R T H rTg H T ' S
FOR FURNITURE.
16 GOVERNOR STREET,
B. FLORSHEIM,
CLOTHING, HATS
AMD
GENTS FURNISHING GOODS.
328 E. BROAD STREET. COR. 4TH
CHEW TOBACCO
MADE BY
KNIGHTS OF LABOR.
BRANDS
MASTER WORKMAN
UNKNOWN KNIGHT.
, For Sale
By All Dealers.
Factory address Box 15, Richmond, Va.
HARDG-ROVE'S
SUN CURED
M WARD, GOLDEN GATE,
PEACH, SWEET ORANGE,
F. BARROW AND CREAM OF
THE ROSES.
"THE BEST IS THE CHEAPEST"
CHEW
THE OLD AND RELIABLE
. BRAND,
DIANORA.
TOBACCO,
Chew Fine Sun Cured Tobacco
CHRISTIAN'S COMFORT
SENATOR, PIONEER,
NEW ERA,
j HENRIETTA, LA MANOLA.
R. J. CHRISTIAN,
Richmond. . - Virginia.
P. WHITLOCK,
manufacturer and dealer in
FINE CIGARS,
r SMOKING AND CHEWING
OBACCO, &c.
No. 11 Governor Street
RICHMOND, VA.
MRS. J- C. DIPNER & CO.
FURNISHING
UNDERTAKERS,
COR. THIRDS MARSHALL STS.
Everything First-Class in this Line.
Telephone IfrTo. 2.
GO TO
KP. TINSLEY'S,
OOTS, "SHOES,
TRUNKS, SACHELS
And everything usually found in a first
class Boot and Shoe Establishment.
623 BROAD STREET.
Willie B. Soulhall. J. E. Prkldy.
W. C. CARRINGTON,
Attorney i Counsellor at law,
ECOB. NINTH AND MAIN ST.
RICHMOND, VA.
SPECIALTIES :
ions. Insurance Claims, and
Railroad Litigation.
-!Hxo no Mfffong •{'tt xog - ba 'Jfijsaip
-ili:iV >- *JS JIUBO3Q pu* <(lUtJI AJO10«J
./(TO "3„ 0«» ..SS33ans„ ..'iii*is»„ "•*"
o% uoivi»)i« reloads irso 9.M.
*>itoio ..jttxirncradj.
-r I jo -JI 9\>vm KOIKII P*|iuq.>l-'D
'STOHOIN 9 TIVH
AJJ 3JIOUIS pooS B JUtJAL uoa - ii
ItOWE BliOTirEltH,
MANUFACTTJRKRS OF
J Crow and Globe Cigars,
UNION MADE.
013 W. Clay street.
PPS & SWEENEY,
DEALERS IN
GROCERIES, FRESH MEATS,
VEGETAIILEX «Sto.
FISH and OYSTERS IN SEASON.
508 I7TH ST.
WOOD OF BEST GRADES IN YARD.
Goods Delivered Free.
JAMES GUNN,
MANUFACTURER OF
TOBACCO BOXES & PINE CASES.
Flooring, Ceiling, Dressed Lumber
and Sycamore in Car-load lots or less.
LOW PRICES.
Office and Factory No. 5 S. 23rd St

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