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East Saginaw courier. (East Saginaw, Mich.) 1859-18??, July 12, 1866, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn97063063/1866-07-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME VII ML 49.
EAST SAGINAW, MICIT., THURSDAY, JULY 12. "1M
WHOLE -NO --3G2,;
EAST SAGINAW COURIER.
CEO. F. LEU IS, Iroir.
Published every Thursday.
Office in Grant Block. Washington Street,
Terms, $2 a Year, in Advance.
Ona Fqsare, (too lines or less,) flnt lnacr
tun
t 100
60
15 00
. 30.DU
. WH O
loo uo
Ech sulisooqPDt tnwrtion.
Ons-eightu Column, one yanr
One-fourth (VI Minn, on yvur
Ono-bulf .Column, one yeur"
One Column, ona. ysur.
ltushivss Cur. Is, six linos or le-f, 15 per annum.
AJvertixmneuts aul Special Notices inserted in
the LochI Col u hi UK 10 rents a line.
BUSINESS DIRECTORY.
'iS ' T SAGIN W .
SAGINAW VALLEY BAKK
":b. IE- Tjrzr,
Banker and Broker,
P-uts and fell Eicnnnges, Pock Notes, Hold
and Silver, Canada Currency.
Aires ptvmpt attention to Collections and Gen
eral Hanking liusincss.
Office : ou Washington Stroel, Bliss Clock,
fcust fcajfiaisr, Mieu.
CIIA17XCKT U. GAGE. WM. A. LEWIS.
Attorneys & Solicitors,
H OFrTCE IN BLISS BLOCK,
-it
t'Ai'T1 ACaiXAW men,
Inriirancc Agency.
JCtna Insurance Co. of Hartford, Fire and
Inland. Assets, $2,500,000
Security Fire, N. Y., Assets, 650,000
Home Ins. Co. of New Haven,
Conn. Assets, 250,000
Conn. T.Jutual Life Ins. Co. As'ts 5,000,000
JOHN J. WHEELER, Agent
For aliore Companies, Exchange Block, East
Saginaw, Michigan. 'v'.lj
WM. L. WKBBK R. 1HVHO M. SMITH
WEBBER & SMITH,
Attorneys, Coumelors and Solicitors. Office, No's
7 18, Crouse Block.
EAST SAGINAW FOUNDERY,
Water street. 31 Ward, E:ist Saginaw All
kin li of oastinirm brans and iron, ani repair
in 4 and fitting of machinery of all descrip
tions, duno promptly and reliably at the above
Institution.
UEOUGE W. MERRILL, Proprietor
PltlZELLE BltOTHERS,
Wholesale and ItcUil Druists and Chemists,
hate fall assortment of Drue; .Medicine
Paints, Oils, Liuuors, Dye Stuffs, etc. llcss
- Blook.
BYBON B. BUCKHOUT.
Vku..!, nrl Rutnil dealer in Lniclish and Amer
' ...n If ir.lornra. Culterv. Iron, Agricultural
1 i.....im.nt Stoves. CoDDer. lin and Sheet
Iron Ware. Ac. Brick Btook, North Water
Street
G. X. ROBINSOW,
' Attorney and Counsellor at Law. Will give
prompt attention to oouecnom. i"
fornon residents, and all burners connected
with a Land Agency promptly auenuou io
.- i LIVERY STABLE.
A. W. Gates SUhlos, corner Washington
and To-wU streets, ih fully stocked with
Horses. Carriages, and everything required
In the line Terms reasonable.
II. MARKS,
' Dealer In Hats, Caps, r urs and Skins, Ready
Male Cl-.thing, Gloves, io. Opposite Ban
croft House.
SHAW, REYNOLDS & CO.,
Doalers in Hardware, Iron, Nails, Glass, Paints,
Oils., eto. Buena Vista Block.
I r. WILLIAM O. DIETZ,
. BnlMer and Superintendent of Buildings, Frank
lin street, between Genesee and German.
H. O. SIIiSBEE,
Wholesale and reUil doalor in and mannracto
rerol Furniture of all kinds. Bales Booms
"' Commercial Block.
J03EPH BURGER,
r r...t.....r . ta&lri in lioots. Shoes,
i.rh ,r Findings. Ac.. Ac. 2d door east of
Evorett House.
dr. noss. m n .
Offi"e In noss Block. Corner of Genesee and
Washington Streets. Residence Corner of Jef
fers.ip ,ani Thompson Streets, East Saginaw.
, PRANK G. WILKIN,
if.,,.1.nf,Tulor. and dealer in Cloths, Cloth
. inir.Vnd Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods 3d
store trom corner, ticumm w.n,
A. B. SPINNEY,
Homfopathlo Physleho jjnd Surgeon. Office
over Lustor's store, Kafnmal B'ock, corner of
fletiesoe and Cass strocts, Eiist Siiginaw, Mich.
fflc hours, 8to 10 A. M.and7 to 6 P.M.
. Besidunce, corner of Cherry and WeUter Sts.
II. R. PROCTOR.
Dealer In Fine Watches and Jewelry, Silver and
Plated Ware. Agent for Burt's Ground Peb
ble and Periscapio Glasses. Opposite Bancroft
House. East Ssgmnw.
It. C. STORR3 & CO.,
Danrsin Groceries, Provisions, Fruits, Vegeta
bles Pro luce, Vamily Supplies, Stona and
Wooden Ware. Crokery, Glass, Paints, Oils,
Carbon Oil, Flour, Feod, etc. Commercial
Block.. x
! BLISS, JANES & CO.,
Poalor'ln Dry ' Goo Is, Groceries, rrovlsloni
Uo.HsA Shoes, etc., Commercial Block.
E. J. MER3HON.
Will attend promptly to the Purchase, Inspect
ing an t Shipment of Lumber from any point
on Saginaw riven Post office address
EAST SAGINAW.
FRED A. KCEHLER.
Blacksmith, and general operator in iron and
steel, Tusoola strbel,
LUTliER BECKWITH A J AS. R. COOK.
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law end Solictors
ir CJUnoery, Office over Wilkirs A Co.'s Store,
- A7ater Street. BAY CITY, MICH.
A. II. MER8HON,
Msnurscturerof pump logs, faucets, Aa. Salt
Blocks furnished to any extent deired, on
fair terms. Office at rw Planing Mill, ft
tar street, ......
F. W. CARLISLE & CO.,
Tanners, Wholesale and Retail dealers In nides,
lirwunr unit rinuinKi, cumvr Bier wuv -'
cola Streets, Knst Saginaw, Michigan, Cash
for Hides and Polta
REAL, ESTATE OFFICE,
WILLIAM N. LITTLE,
ZxcaaegeBloek, Et Suginsw, Michigan, corner
Ueneaee ana n ater streets.
SHAW, BTJLLARD &, CO.
WIIOLESA LK ii HO CKItS,
Burt Block, Water Street, Esst Saginaw.
A-very largs stoek ef everything In the line.
W. If. BOUTHWICK,
United 8tnts Asststnnt Assessor for that psrt of
Piiginaw County lying east of Sasrinaw River.
OOice at Ward & Southwiik'i Tobaoco and
Belting Store. J.
SiVaiiSTA-AV city.
W. M. MILLER.
Attorney and Counsellor at Law, and Proc
tor in Admiralty. SAGINAW CITY.
A. 3. OAYLORD, ''
Attorney and Counsellor at Law, Solicitor
in Chiacery, Ae. SA'JINAW CITY.
M. W VAWIIKV,
Commission Agents and Dealers in
Lumbor, Shingles, Lath, &c.
orner Office, Socond Floor, Buena Vista Block
EAST SAOINAW, MICH.
Orders filled promptly and at Market Bntos.
OOODINQ & HAWKINS,
FORWARDING, COMMISSION
ahd "
General Kteambont Agent.
Ea.it Satfinaw, Mick.
D. W. GOODING. W. HAWKINS.
NEW GOODS,
NEW GOODS,
AT
E. P. & H. L. Fenfield's.
Irving' Block, Genesee Street.
SUMMER
DRESS GOODS.
BALMORAL SKIRTS,
KNIT GOODS,
WOOLEN HOSIERY. & GLOVES,
Woolen Yarn, all Colors.
BLANKETS,
BAGS,
' FLANNELS,
Carpets,
Druggets.
Wall Paper,
PArER HANGINGS, &c, &'c, &c,
Also Agents for the Celebrated .
FLORENCE SEWING MACIIINE.
RECONSTRUCTED I "
BUENHAM & POOL,
Successors te Steven, PojI A Co.
EVERETT BLOCK.
NEW AND ELEGANT STOCK OF
DEY GOODS,
CARPETS,
DRESS GOODS,
r
rauii
LADIES' FURNISHING GOODS
Summer Shawls etc.
The choicest assortment ever offered In this
; inarket . 1
EastSagiuaw, May 18CG.
OUR STORE
Everett IXIok, Genec? Street,
' F1TE DOOM SOCTII OF THE CORNER,
IS FULL OF CHOICE. GOODS.
We offer especial inducements to the Ladies in
tbe way or
SHAWLS.
WORSTED GOODS,
TRIMMINGS,
And a rare variety of . , , ,
T3T,ESS GOODS,
Of every style and quality, also a full line of
Domestics!
Most Complete Assortment of
. CARPETS
In the Valley. Also a fine St.-k of TABLE AND
FLOOR OILCLOTHS, DRUGGETS, MATTING
Ao.
HOSIERY, HOOP SKIRTS, NOTIONS, Ac., Ac
Wholesale and Retail.
AT
Tho Very. Lowest Prices
lT7"Country Dealers and others will find it to
tueir advantage to give ns a call.
BURN II AM & TOOL
b3C0
NOTICE.
TVT0TICE Is hereby riven that on the 23th da
11 of May, 1PG6, I found by the shore of th
Saginaw River. In the Tow.ishipof Korbville, in
the County of Saginaw, Michigan one Scow or
Liehtor, t owner of wLub Is unknown. Thi
not live is given in eotnplianee with chapter 47, of
the compiled Laws of the Sta,te or Michigan
entitlod of ' lost goods and stray bexsts "
v JOU SHIELINO.
D.U1 tbtl 29th dsy of May, I960.
E'. THATCHER'S '
Real Estate Column.
Oflice over tore, HnDnn Mlrh.. and
with Dr. J H. luttlf No. HI,
I'rousf IJ'oclf 11, frifiglnaw.
- - - -FOBSALB;
HCUSE and LOT on Markmsw street, Sulrnnj,
convenient to Street Ruilwayt lately owned
by B.Smith. Price 12,000.
Ii. lUAHUUtt.
FOR SALE.
f TOrSE AND BARN, with It j near Street
LX Kailway.'tn Salina. Prli tW.
STORE, for Dry Goods trade, and Sloe of
Goods for sale at Salina.
E, Til ITCI1ER.
i'1 1 1 - '
FOR SALE.
on( TOWN LOTS, In Salina. Trices low,
Jvf" " turn is easy.
E. THATCHER.
; ' FOR SALE.
ACRES Choies Land, S W Section 3,
in linena Vista. Apply at my office in
. k. THATCHER.
1G0
Sulina.
FOR SALE.
" OT Ij. in block 16, In Gslmn-her's pint of
JJ Kna. ' ' ' K. THATCHER.
FOR SALE.
11115 FROPFRTY occupied y me at Salina,
"with 200 'twt'imnt an City Railway, cn-
nininu a good Two Story lnuble Store, uith Of
fice Rooms atxive, good Wuol House, Bern and
fee house. " Also a, wIl-riniehe.i itrwi convenient
Dtelliag House.' - K. TllATCHKtt.
a;
jrrSTE, ' 1866.'
D I. Tltt) IT AND MII,WAUKi;U
RAILROAD, in Connection with t'ua New
and Powerf ul I'pper Cubin Steamsbipa "Detroit.'
and Milwaukee.
Fntll further notice, trains will leave Holly, as
follows :
COIXCJ WEST,
Mail at 1:00 P M. fur Lansing A Milwaukee.
Mixel at : 10 P. M for Fentooville
Mixed at 11:40 P. M., for Grand Haven.
30ii i:amt.
Mixed at 7:2U A. M for DetQ.
Accom. at 9:;i0 A. M. Tor DetroirF
Mail at 2:'.J5 P. M fr Detroit.
Express at 4:C5 P. M. for Detroit.
HUcpIng Cars on ell Mkrlt Trains.
REFRESHMENTS at Detroit, Cwomo and
Grmid Haven, and uixjh Company's Ferry
Steamer on Detroit River
Comfortable Hotel above Depot at Grand Haven
COXXHCTIONX.
IT nrTrtfiTT ih i:n,t Vt..rn and Grand
Trunk Railways for all poiuts East Michigan
Central and Mk hisriin Southern Railmads.
AT MILWAIKISK, with the MiiwauKee
. IV.,,1 V,I-0,,L an.l tr,.iri flu 1'hit-n. and
Milwaukee A Chicugo Railroads, for all j.oints
West and Northwest.
P77lilu..iui.ri furCrnnt Wtern Railway Co
on the Company's Ferry Stennier, at D. A M. R
R Dock, t ll:' 5 A M , nd 6.10 P. M.
V X m vtricm 'Pi.ii.
J HQS. HELL. Gen'l f un't.
BROWN, HALL & JAMES
LAW & COLLECTION OFFICE,
Eoal Estato,
AND
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENCY
?N' ' "It" Block,
Jonathan Hall. ..
T. W. James,' $ 8a8,,,aw
Particular -Attention
' GIVEN TO THE
PAYMENT OF TAXES
AND
Frocnricg Abstracts cf Title.
INSURANCE.
Fire and Marine Companies represented t
North America, of Philadelphia,
Underwriters,
Security,
Continental,
OIF NEWYORK.
WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS,
Narragansott, of Providence,
. Connecticut, of Tlartford,
LUMBERMAN'S, OF CHICAGO.
; LIE CO.TU'AXlX9:
The Old Connecticut Mutual,
Equitable, ox New York,
NEW YORK ACCIDENTAL,
. ( - ' ' ' , AND 3
Travelers' insurance Company
O Of Providers try II. IV ;
From the Scientific American. Ang. 23, 1343.
. ATTRACTION".
Attraction is a eurlons power.
That none can understand:
Its influence is every where
in water, air and land '
It keeps the eartb compact and tight,
As though strong bo' Is were through It j
And what is more mysterious yet,
It binds us mortal to it.
Ton throw a stone up In tie air,
And down It comes ker-whack I '
The centrifugal ousts it up
Tbe centripetal Lack
My eyes! I can't discover bow
. One object 'tracts another
Unless they love each other, like "
A sister aud a brother.
I know tbe compass always points
Directly to the pole :
Some say the North Star causes this,
And some say Symmt't Haiti
Perhaps it docs erhips it don't t
Perhaps some other cause J
Keep on ptrhupting--who van solve
Attraction's biddun laws? .
A fly lights on ft 'losses cup
Attraction bids bim woo it j
And when he's In, attraction keeps
The chap from paddling through it.
Attraction lures the A to drink,
- To all his troubles drown
But when bis legs give wsy, be falls,
And 'tract iou keeps bim down.
Attraction is ft curious power,
That none can understand i
Its influence is ever) where
in wutcr, air and land.
It operates on everything
Tbe sea, the tides, the weather;
And sometimes draws the sexes up,
And binds them fust tegutbc r.
ALLITERATIVE.
An Arctic acrobat alone,
By 1 orean brectvs brickly blown,
Comes clrcumvolving cuiiously
Determined darting dringly
Each eve entranced each ear elate
Fust flying freely. Fancy, fate, .
Grand, gorgeous greutness, golden goal,
Him hurry himtily. His whole
Intense, ir.flutod intcre.-t
Joins, jovially, joy's jlly Jest.
Keen-sighted, kin lly-heai ted knight,
Leup lively, like love's living light;
M.iko merry measures, inmio meet,
Norse-skater, nimble-footed, ucat,
O'er ocean, olden, obdurate.
Persistently peregrinutet
Quickly qucmh questions, querulous quiet,
Remouib'riug rahlinvss, ruins rilit,
?lip smuothlyi swiftly, softly slide,
Till thaws the Urdy, t irrjrina' tide.
I n paralleled udra-mouUne
Veer vauLtiuglyi vexatine vaine,
Will, wisely wandering, wither, wane,
'Xpert 'Xhil itor, 'Xp.re
Your yieldlt ss yulo-tidu's youthful yore,
Ziraggin tealot, ustful o'er.
CARL SCIlUnZ ON THE EUROPEAN
WAR.
Austria and PruIa.
From the Detroil Pout Juno 22.
The greatest armies ever raised by
Austria, Prussia and Italy are now
standing face to face, ready to strike,
waiting only for tho word : March!
Although it would bo hazardous to
predict what will be tho final result of
the gigantic struggle, y t we are per
mitted to draw some conclusions as to
the future from tho past history, the
comparative strength and tho present
condition of the contending powers.
In jioint of territory nnd popula
tion, Austria is by far the strongest
of;the three, but as to populat'ou not
ns strong as Prussia and Italy com
bined. , Tho area of Austria is Li.'JO,
311 English square miles, while Prus
sia has only luV2l2 atid Italy 1ISJ84.
The population of Austria is comput
ed at il(,7l-J,000 souls ; that of Prus
sia" waa in 1G4 about 19,o()."),b0!. and
that of Italy 21,70:1,710, giving Italy
and Prussia combined un exwss over
Austria of more thac 4,000,000.
Aside from the question of num
bers, the population of Austria is far
less homogeneous than flint of either
Prussia or Italy. Tho empire of Aus
tria is a vast pen, in which nt least
half a dozen, more or less, distinct
nationalities aro hedged in. There are
over 9,000,000 Germans; over 5,000,
000 Magyars ; Italians, Bohemians,
Slovacks, Moravians, Slavonians,
Croats, Poles, r-crvians, Bulgarians,
Eastern Iiouians, and other nations of j
less importance to make up tho bal
ance. These different nationalities
have had hardly anything in common
but the Central Government; "neither
language nor social forms nd cus-
toms, nor economical interests, nor order, and the administration well reg- j Slavery is abohsou, and neither. can,
even affection for tho family ruling J ulated. The Prussian army, on a war nor ought to be, re-established in any
over thetn all. While each of them ; footing, amounts to about (100,000. It State or Territory within our jurisdic
cherishes its own political and nation- . is well drilled and admirably aimed, tion ;
al aspirations, ndt seldom seriously
mmiicTinrr tviin inn interests oi i
Imperial dyuasty, th'ey intensely dis
. o .. . : ::
liko each other, and their mutal jeal-
busies have furnished means by which
the "Kaiser" has been ablo to keep
them all in subjection 1 he Austrian
Empire presents the singular spectacle
V t M IIUIJ1UVI VI UlUUIII IJHIIUI1UII1.1..1,
each aspiring to liberty for itself, and ( were hor moral condition equal to her the right of each State to order and i tnjg B;ntrUiar people moro than a
each jwrmitting itself to bo used as an physical. Whilo in Austria tho popu- control its own domestic concerns, ae- third of the whole human race look
instrument in keeping down the rest, j lation, t ith the exception of Hungary , cording to its own judgment exclusive-1 jown w;tu Bomfl contempt on the 'out
Of this the last twenty years havo and Italy, comes to the support of the ' ly, subject only to t he Constitution of Bj(je raccs them not be too harshly
luimsue. iuu iiiooij Biiiimi inuiiu -
tions. When tho Italians rose," Aus-
tnan armies composed of Oormans, people, a small party excepted, are vioi foction and endurance of our political
Hungarians, Bohemians, Slovacks, ' lontly opposod to the war. The long fabrio depend, and the ovorthrow of
Croats and other tribes wero sent and todious struggle' between the. that system by the usurpation and
against them to reduce them to sub-1 Crown and the Itepresentative Assem- centralization of power iu Congress
jection. When, 1 8, revolutionary . blios have soured the popular temper, . would be a rovo'ution, dangerous to
movements took place in Bohemia, in and tho despotic, unscrupulous and republican government and destruc
the German part of Austria, and in 1 reckless conduct of Cqunt Bismark, . tive of liberty ;
Hungary, they wore put down in the the Prime Minister, lias devoloped tho Each Houso of Congress is made,
same manner by Austrian soldiers be- dissatisfaction with the Government -by the Constitution, tho pole judge of
longing, to other nationalities. This into exasperation. Although the the eloctions, returns, and qualilica
game was played with great skill and j Prussian army is generally regarded j tions of its members ; but tho exciu
goneral success, although in the case asione of the host, disciplined 4ia the sion of loyal Senators nnd Keprosotv-
of tho ITunarian revolution, in 1849, '
tlio aid of Russia had to he called in to
save the throne of tho llnpsburjjs. (
While thus the different natbnali-'
h tho Kmpire of Austria
consists may well lie used in case of laudwehr." The 44 landwehr " duos where, which can serve no other j.ur
need, one against another, yet each of not, as sotno of our cotetnporaries j jtose than to rekindle the aniniOHitiea
theni adheres to its ow National. asU seotn to believe, consist of raw levies 'of war, and the elhw-t of which upon
rations, ami is always ready to use or fresh conscripts: it consists of num I our moral, social and material inter-
overy opportunity presenting ttso f for
their furtherance. A situation like the
present, it which the Kniperor in
obliged to call upon the hearty co-operation
of nil his peoples, is not tin
likely to be taken advantage of for
such purposes. Although on the whole
the responso to tho call to arms is sat- it is composed of men in tho full vigor
isfactory enough, we learn that the of their manhood, has been looked
Hungarians are by no moans inclined ( upon us the bebt part of the Prus n
to aid the Kniperor with anything like ' army. But, as these men form the
ardor nnd enthusiasm, unless the de- I einew of tho country, and mostly have
mandsthey have never ceased pressing ' families, the calling out the "lan.1.
smce 18 IM, bo com died with. As to 1 wehr" involves a violent and disas
Venctia, tho Julian province of Aus-j trous interruption of all industrial
tria, it is evideut tliat tlio population pursuits, and is a terrible blow to t ie
will be, to a man, hostile to Austria in j families they leave behind unnrovid I
tho impending struggle; and already fur., tfuch s;icriliea are made cheer
aro all the regiments raised by Aus- ; fully only when the cause to be fought
tria in that province transported to
ot!er parts of the Empire, where they
will have to fight, not ugainst Italians '
but "ngainst Prussians, to whom they
are not bound by any ties of national j
sympathy. It is expected, however, '
that, well aware of the understanding 1
existing between Prussia nnd the
Kingdom of Italy, many of them will
desert the Austria colors and go over
to tho enemy.
Ono ol the principal difficulties Aus
tria has to contend with consists in
the precarious condition of her finan
ces. For several generations Austria
has boo; proverbially bankrupt. The
Napoleonic wars left her finances in a
state of utter prostrution; there was a
slow, gradual improvement from 1815
to 184, whMt tho revolutionary gale
swept over Europe, shaking the Aus
trian Empire to its very foundations,
and bringing it again near the verge
of absolute batik uptcy. Austria had
hardly somewhat recovered Irons, tho
shock when tlio Crimean war, during
which she hud to maintain au "armed
neutrality," and the Italiau war again
reproduced the same I'tnbarrassnient.
The gigantic armaments she is now
making render her financial condition
almost hopeless. Tho annual expen
d. lures over receipts, which has been
very great almost from time immemo
rial, must be appalling; and it would
seem almost mcedible that tho despe
rate shifts and expedients by which
she has extricated herself from so
many distressing dilhYulties hereto
foro should still prove available this
time.
That Austria, burdened with such a
load of embarrassments, fchould un
dertake a great war ngain.it so form
idable a combination as that Italy nnd
l'russia would almost seem an uct of
temerity. And yet this is not tho first
lime that Austria has undertaken sim
ilar things under similar circumstan
ces; nnd if the art to make wir with
out motley has anywhere been reduced
to a science by frequent sticcessil ex
periments, it is in Austria. Desperate
and hopeless as the situation would
seem to any other man, to an Austrian
it seems merely familiar.
The Austrian army is over 700,000
men strong on a war footing; proba
bly at present not far from 00,0;i0.
It contains some of the best fighting
material in the world. The Hunga
rian cavalry, the German and Bohem
ian iiifantrj?, the Tyroleno and Styrian
sharp-shooters are without superiors.
'1 ho many reverses Austria has suffer
ed on the field of battle were owing
not tlio quality of men, but to tho in
elliciency of their commanders. The
Austrian soldiers always fought well
when well lead, and it is likely that
they will bo well lead in the coming
war, at least on one theater of opera
tions. General Benedek, tho com
mander of the Austrian army concen
trated near the Prussian frontier, is
no doubt vastly superior to any Gene
ral sho has had since tho death of Ila
det.ki. It was ho who in the lmttlo
of Solferino, when he commanded the
extreme right of the Austrians, coni-
pletely defeated the Italians, while tho.)
rest of the Austrian nrmy gave way I
boforo the I rench. His appointment '
to tho most important command now ,
was certainly a fortunate one. W hile
ho lm. ia full rwintwh
prooal.le that tho Austrian armies to
operate against lVussiu will bo at least civil war
yoO.000 strong, while from 150,000 to j There no Tjglti anywhere, to dis
200,000 will be considered sulHeient to I -olvo thjl Union, or to seoarato States
hold the quadrilateral ugainst the Ital
iaus in the meantime
Tl .
i russiu oreseius in iu;wiv rrnnueisu
. favorable contrast to Austria. Her
1 jiopulation is moro homogeneous, it
' being all German except 2,500,000;
her debt Is light, her finances in good
the Prussian breech-lo iding needle
i mm iiKire ri imtinr nuwu-nr r inn ntur
, e . v "J
other European army can boast of. In
all theso resnoets Prussia would be in
an excellent condition to undertake a
war. Although greatly inferior to
... . . i : -
Austria in territory and population,
) she would have no reason to dread a
DlllU t?-IUUV4C4 t,Ullbt3b tbll 4&U3l.lCl.
1 jrovernuieni, u not wuu eiiiiiutKusiu,
at least with willingness, tho Prussian
world, tho recent nrmameuta have lol
to scenes which any where else, would
be looked Ukd us tho ti
solution. The iuobiliz
rulude to dis-1
izution of the
arniv involved the callinir out of the :
who, after having nerved their regular
term in the "liue." are permitted to
ivtuiu to civil pursuits, liable to be
culled out wh( never tho army in mo
bilized" for active service. The "land
wehr" is therefore a wed drilled body
of vetfran a. ldiers, and, inasmuch as
for has the sympathy of tho people, j
I3ut the laudwehr" was culled out ;
this time merely for tho execution of
tho ambitious plans of a detested I
Minister, tho cry of anger was raised
bv tho men who had to iro. and a ci v !
0f distress by the families loft behind.
Iioud eurea were utlerod against Bin- !
mark, ollicers were beaten, railroad
depots were demolished, nnd the de
monstrations of fury and despair stop
ped short only of geueral resistance to
the royal deoreo.
A spirit like this, if it continue,
might have a very important influence
upon tho events of the war. Men who
are so profoundly disgusted with the
cause they are culled upon to fight for
that victory or defeat is to them all
the same, ure uot likely to fight with
that spirit upon which success m
largely depends. They ma not find
it convenient to expose their lives J
more than they aro absolutely obliged
to, and tako their revenge of tho Gov
ernment by simply abandoning tho in
stigators of the war to themselves nt
tho decisivo momeut. On the other
hand, it is. uot impossible that their
soldierly spirit will get tho better of
their resentment when the first shot
is fired, and M e should not be surpris
ed in that cuse to see them fie ht bet
ter than tl cy now intend to.
Taking all these moral and physical
elements of success together, it would
sciii that at the commencement of
hostilities Austria will probably have
anot inconsiderable advantage over
her German rival. In Germany she
will undoubtedly be stronger, inas
much ns tho minor German States, n!
mo?st without exception openly or se
cretly sympathize with her. But the
ultimate result of tho war will not de
pond ou tho German powers alone
The equilibrium of strength may be
rd.st.ored or the preponderance decided
in the weight which Italy and, per
haps, Franco will throw into tho scale,
and whether Austria will be able io
withstand so powerful a combination,
is exceedingly doubtful. Of this as
pect ot the question, however, we in
tend to speak on another occasion.
National Union Convention.
A National Union Convention, of at
least two delegates from euch con
gressional district of all the Stales,
two from each Territory, two from the
District of Columbia, and four dele
gates at largo from'rach State, will be
held at tho city of Philadelphia, on
the second Tuesday (14th) of August
next.
Such delegates will be chosen by
tho electors of the several States who
sustain the Administration in main
taining unbrokeu tho Union of the
States, under the Constitution which
our fathers established, and who agree
in tho following proposit ons, viz:
The Union of the States is, in eve
ry case, indissoluble, and is perpetual;'
and tho Constitution
ot tho United
1 States, and the laws passed by Con
! gress in pursuauco thereof, supreme,
! nnd Puiist nt. niul linivKfK.il i.. their
obligation ;
Tho ts, tho dignity and tho
rquality of tho States in tli3 Union,
intiuling the right of representation
, in tWress, aro solemnly guaranteed ,
tr(i!lit..rn .VM.H v,M.n,lw,l i tho bitn
from the Union either by voluntary
tvit.iirfrfl.wiii. hv force of iirms. or bv
i - ' .
cuiiiriesfnuiiu uuhuh, ueuuer iv uic
secession of the Statos, nor by the ex -
elusion of their loyal and qualified
representatives, nor by the ,at'until
Government in any other form ;
t Each State has tho undoubted right
rr urnscriiift i n miniinem ona oi its
own electors, and no external power
riirhtfullv can. or ounht to. dictate.
i . . .
. " i ,C ' i . i
control, or inlluenco the free and vol
untary action of the States in the ex
ereiso of that right j
I The mnintenanco inviolate of tho
AImIBI Ul MTJ k.kt.tl.-Q, KI1V c-l ll.l 1 V' a
uiu uunwi uiuiws, is upseuimi a wiui
balance of power on which thep'er -
tofvea, properly chosen nnj qualified,
under the Constitution and laws, is un
jus, and revolutionary;
kverv natnot bliouM frown upon all
tlnmt acta and proceed intra every -
ests at home, and upon our standing
abroJd, differing only in degree, is in
jurious like war itself;
. The purpose of the war having been
to preserve the Union nnd the Consti
tution by putting down the rebellion,
and the rebellion having been sup
pressed all resistance to the author
ity of the General Government being
at an end, and the war having ceased
war measures should also cease, and
lYoulJ be' followed" fy measures of
Iieacei'ul administration, eo that union,
furinony and concord may be' encour
aged, and industry, commerce, and the'
arts of peuco revived and promoted ;
and tho early restoration of till the
States to the exercise of their consti
tutional powers in the Natioual Gov
ernment is indispensably necessary to
the strength and the dnfenco of the
liepublic, and to the maintenance of
the public cred.t ;
All such electors in the thirty-six
States and nine Territories of the
Un ted States, und in the District of
Columbia, who in the spirit ot pat
riytism and love for the Union, can
rise above pers 'ual and sectional con
siderations, and who desire to see a
truly National Union Convention, that
shall represent all the States and Ter
ritories of the Union, assemble, as
friends t.nd brothers, under tho na
tional flag, to hold counsel together
upon the state of the Union, and to
take measures to avert possible dan
ger from the same, are Specially re
quested to take part in the choice of
such delegates.
But no delejrate will tako a scat in
such Convention who does not loyally
accept the national situation and cor
dially endor-e and approve the princi
ples above set forth, and who is not
uttached, in true allegiance, to the
Constitution, the Union, and tho Gov
ernment of the United States.
Wasuinoton, Juno 25, 1800.
A. Y KANDALL, IWt.
J. K. DooMTTLE,
O. II. Bkownikq,
Edgar Cowan,
Ciiaklks Knap,
Samckl Fowlkr,
IZctruMre Com. Xational Union Club.
We recommend the holding of the
abovo Convention, aud endorse the
cull therefor.
Daniel S. Noeton,
J. V. Nksmitu,
Jamks Dixon,
T. A. Hkndujcks.
THE ARTS IN CIIINA.
They have manufacturers of falso
noses in Chiua, but none of false
teeth. There are practitioners who
profess to cure the toothuche instanta
neously, and people worthy of credit
have assured me they succeed in doing
so. The works of Europe ;n dentists
are among the most admired exam
ples of foreigners. A mandariu who
was unxious to learn something about
the making of teeth, onto produced
to me a box full of artificial noses of
various sizes and colors, with which
he suppled the defects of his owu.
He said he used one sort of nose be
fore, and another after his meals, and
insisted that Chiuese iugcuuity wus
greater than our own. hat, in pro-
I A Ml 1 . .1 . rt
cess ol time, win oo the action oi
western civilization on the farthest
eastern regions whether, and in
what shape, we shall mako returns for
the instruction our foieljathers received
from thence is u curious and interesting-inquiry-more
interesting from
the vast extent of the regions before
us. The fire-engiue is almost the on
ly foreign . mechanical power which
has been popularized in China. There
is scarcely a watch or clock maker in
the whole empire, though opulent
Ktuen generally carry two watches.
The rude Chinese agricultural and
manufacturing instruments have been
nowhere supplauted by European im
provements. No steamship has been
built by the Chinese. The only I ever
saw would ' Tiot move after it was
aunched. It was said a Chinaman,
the authontes to construct the vessel.
There is neither gold nor silver coin
age; tho only currency being a base
metal, cAn, whose value is the tilth
, of ft mrth-n Yot they have arts, to
mm
j US wnony uusnown. iney givo io ?op-
...a. l. , .1 ,l. ....... ,o
icta hardness and sharpness of steel.
1 can.
brightest
Len,tU9fV
cannot mutato some of their
colors. Thev have lately
sent us the only natural green which
is permanent, which has been known
to them, as printing, wood engraving,
tho compass, artillery practice, and
other great inventions, from time im
memorial. Paper was made from rags
long anterior to tho Christian era, and
i ; . . i ..-n
i-.p t-.i Tlw Pliim-sn nmv b!l ' , J ,
I f ... i f i ' ..L'i i ho pities our weakues, but not
uronusorv notes were usea ai a sun
P'ouu -oi u mug
proud - ot a languago nnd a literature
which has existed for thirty centuries,
while in Europe there is no literary
languago now written or spoken,
which would have been intelligible
1... a. ,!.... I .nncl n
If, then,
, U(j(jod or to precipitately condemned
j .
When you run short of idea, use
hlglifalutin words. To nine persons
out of ten the bass drum affords more
delight than the guitar.
TnK Mask Off. A year ago, almost
all the llepublican State Conventions
hypocritically indorsed the President.
This year, only Thad. Stovens, Char-
les Sumner & Co. are endorsed in
Ohio, Maine, and else whore.
' USE3 OP ICE.
In health no one ought to drink ice
water, for it has occasioned fatal in-'
flauiutions of he stomach and bowels, .
aud , sometimes sudden death. The",
temptation to fiink it is very great in
summer; to use it at all with any de-'
groe of safety, the person should take '
but a siogle swallow at a time, take,
the glass from the lips for half amin-'
ute, and then another swallow, an ; b6
on. It will be found that in this way"
it becomes disagreeable after a few.
mouthfuls. On tho other hand, icw it'
Belf may be taken as freely as possi
ble, not only without injury, but with
the most striking advantage in dan
gerous forms of disease.
, If broken in sizes of P offceanj'
and swallowed as freely ad pfattlcS-
Liu, without fiinch-v chewing orcruh4r
hig between the teeth, it will often,
be eflicicnt in checking various kinds
of diarrhoea, and has cured violent
cases of .Asiatic cholera.
A kind of cushion of powdered ice
kept to the entire scalrt, has allayed"
violent inllamations ot the brain, ar-,
rested fearful convulsions induced by
too much blood there. In croup, wa-
ter, as cold as ice can make it, applied,
freely to the throat, neck and chest,
with a spongo or cloth, very often af
fords an almost miraculous relief, and
if this be followed by drinking copi
ously of the 6a me ice-cold element,
the wetted parts wiped dry, and the
child be wrapped up well in the bedV
clothes, it falls into a delightful and
life giving slumber. AU inflamationa
internal or external, are promptly sub
dued by the application of ice or ice
water, because it is converted into
steam and rapidly conveys away the
extra heat, aud also diminishes the
quantity of blood iu'the vessels of the
part. A pieco of ico laid on the wrist will
often arrest violent bleeding of the'
nose. To drink any ice-col 1 liquid at
meals retards digestion, chills the
body, and has been known to induce
the most dangerous internal conges
tions. Itefrigeratora constructed to'
have the ice above, are as philosaphi
cal as they are healthful, lor the ice'
does not come in contact with the wa
ter or other contents, yet keeps them
nil nearly ice cold. If tho ice is put
in milk or on butter, and theso are hot
used ut tho time, they lose their fresh
ness and become sour' and stale, for
the essential nature of both is changod
when once frozen and then thawed.-1
llaWt Journal of Health.
VARJET1ES.
"TriflcsllgUtas air." t
Ten tobacco factories aTe in opera-1
tion at Danville, Virginia. ,
Mount Vesuvius is again exhibiting
signs of internal commotion.
liiind near St. Paul's churchyard in
London, is worth $5,000,000 per acre:
Secretary Welles has niado a chief
clerk of his son.
The natives and blacks of Cuba are
about to revolute. This thing of turn-'
ing on tbe points of bayonets is rather
uneasy resting. . :
Greeley is for universal amnesty
and universal suffrage. We will com
promise with him on the first half of
his proposition;-
A robber's cave has been discovered
in Cornwall, New York, fitted up with
beds, cooking u tens' Is, &c.
Humility glorifies God ; pride, dis
honors Him ; humility makes men to
be like angels ; pride makes angels to
become devils.
A fashionable party lately arrived
at Newport with eight hundred par
cols of luggage. .
Private Miles O'Kielly, it fs eafd",
had a very large hand in writing the
prison life of Jeff. Davis. 1
A man in Indiana' applied for a di
vorce because his wife went ska'Jing
against his wishes, and, he wanted to
let her slide.
Spurgeon says : "Teaching men
morals is as though I had a clock that
would not go, and I turned round one
of the cogwheels; but faith "takes tho
key and winds up the mainspring,and
tho whole thing runs on readily."
A jury just inipanneled in N. Y.
represents seventy-five millions of dol
lars. Belmont, Astor, Stewart, and
others compose it.
A Liverpool paper say' that city
4 continues' to maintain thd' position
which she has long held as the most
unhealthy town in the kingdom."
A skeptic thinks it is very extraord
inary that an ass once talked like a
man. Isn't it more extraordinary that
thousands of men are continually
.talking like asses 2 .
The Buffalo Commercial calls upoa
: Senator Sprague to make a constitu-
tioiial amendment by censing to ilea
his shirt collar us a tunnel'.-
It was a happy sentiment of some
devout writer, that God carries his
" i i i ..
alk ;
our
sloth.
Susan B. Anthony has returned to
her home in Bochcster, N. Y., for a
few weeks of rest prior to fresh raid
on the publio in behalf of auti-slavery
and women's rights. .
An infant wns strangled' to death in
New York, the other day, by attempt
ing to swallow an ornamental ball at
tached to a waterfall pin, which, had
been given to it to play with.
What city in Prance is a man alout
to visit wLen he goes to get married ?
He is goinp to Havre, (have her.) An
old bachelor being asked he question,
promptly replied: To Iiouen (ruin.)
The patriotic bricklayer, of LewJM",.
who-kicked Doctor Butler, has adopt
ed Butler's bottle for a erest, and for
arms a shield bearing a boot rampant.
: with the motto : "Let all th end
thou aim'st at be," &c

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