OCR Interpretation


East Saginaw courier. (East Saginaw, Mich.) 1859-18??, August 09, 1866, Image 1

Image and text provided by Central Michigan University, Clark Historical Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn97063063/1866-08-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

1
V.
o ;
EAST SAGIOT MICE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, i860.
.WHOLE JT0 3G0.
VOLUME VIII. NO. 2.
iff X rfvY
- r
EAST SAGINAW COURIER.
CEO. V, MI WIS, rror.
Published very Thursday.
Office in Grant Block, Washington Street,
Terms, $2 a Year, in Advance.
. One Fijumt, (ton Unci or lest,) first Inser-"
tion I
Each nulxionqent Insertion .........
One-eighth Column, one year
One-fourth Column, one year
100
60
15.00
30.00
B0 00
One-half Column, one year
One Column, one year
10000
Business Card, six lines or less, 95 per annum.
' Advertisements and SpocUl Notices inserted In
the I.ocal Columua 10 centi a lino.
BUSINESS DIRECTORY.
15 HI? HAGINA W.
SAGINAW VALLEY BANK
Banker and Broker,
Buys and sells JExebanges, Bank Notes, Gold
and Silver, Canada Currency.
Hires prompt attention to Collection and Gen
eral Hanking Business.
OrriCR : on Washington Street, Bliss Block,
Eiist Saginaw, Mich.
ClUO'CEV II. OAOE.
GAGE
WM. A. LEWIS.
lis win,
Attorneys & Soli ciors.
OFFICE IN BLISS BLOCK,
EAST AfilVVW, IT1ICII.
liiriirancc Agency.
JEtna Insurance Co. of Ilartford, Tire and
Inland. Assets, $2,50(1,000
Security Fire, N. Y., Assets, 650,000
Home Ins. Co. of New Ilaven,
Conn. Assets, 250,000
Conn. Mutual Life Ins. Co. As'ts 5,000,000
JOHN J. WHEELER, Agent
For aboTe Companies, Exchange Block, East
Saginaw, Michigan. 209 j
WD. L. WKHBR H. IRVING M. SMITH.
WEBBER ft SMITH,
Attorneys, Counselors and Solicitors. Office, No's
7 A 8, Crouse Block.
EAST SAGINAW FOUNDEIIY,
Water street, 3d Ward, East Saginaw. All
kinds of canting In brans and iron, and repair
ing and fitting of machinery of all descrip
tions, done promptly and reliably at the above
institution
GEORGE W. MERRILL, Proprietor.
FKIZELLE BROTHERS.
Wholesale and Retail Druggists and Chemists,
have full assortment of Drugs; Medicines,
l'aints, Oils, Liquors, Dye Stuffs, etc Hess
Block.
BYRON B. BUCKHOUT.
Wholesale and Retail dealer in Englich and Amer
ican Hardware, Cultcry, Iron, Agricultural
Implements, Stoves, Copper, lln and Sheet
Iron Ware, 4c. Brick Block, North Water
Street
C. K. ROBINSON.
Attorney and Counsellor at Law. 'Will give
prompt attention to collections. Taxes paid
fornon residents, and all business connected
with a Lind Agency promptly attended to.
" LIVERY STABLE.
A. W. Ontos Stables, corner Washington
an 1 Tusoola streets, are fully stocked with
Horses, Carriages, and everything required
in the line. Terms reasonable.
II. MARKS, ,
Dealer In Hats, Caps, i'urs and Skins, Beady
Made Clothing, Gloves, Ao. Opposite Ban
. croft House.
SHAW. REYNOLDS & CO.,
Dealers in Hardware, Tron, Nails, Glass, Taints,
Oils, eto. Buena Vista Block.
WILLIAM O. DIETZ,
Builder and Superintendent of Building, Frank
lin street, between Gcncsce and German.
H. O. SILSBEE,
Wholesale and retail doaler in and mannractu
rerof Furniture of all kinds. Sales Booms
Commercial Block.
. JOSEPH BURGER,
M.nnranturernf and dealers in Boots. Shoes,
Leather, Findings, Ac, Ao. 2d door east of
hverctt House.
DR. ROSS. .
Office in Hess Block, Corner of Goncsee and
Washington Streets. Residence Corner of J ef
fersou and Thompson Streots, East Saginaw.
FRANK G. WILKIN,
Merchant Tailor, and dealer In Cloths, Cloth
ing, and Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods 3d
store from corner, r,xcnang iioc,
A. B. SPINNEY,
Homoeopathic Thysician and Surgeon. Pffice
over Luster's store. National Block, corner oi
Genesee sod Cass streets, Esst Saginaw, Mich.
Ofllce hours, 8 to 10 A. M. and 7 to 6 P. M.
Deatdenoe, corner of Cherry ana weDsier bis.
II. R. PROCTOR.
ii.Ja. n rina Watahea and Jewelrv. Silver and
l'lotod Ware. Agent for Burt's Ground Peb
ble and I'eriscapio Glosses. Opposite Bancroft
House. East Saginaw.
' -
L. C. 8TORRS & CO..
iwirin Groceries. Provisions, Fruits, Vegeta.
bios Produce, Family Supplies, Stona and
Wooden Ware. Crockery. Glass. Paints, Oils,
. Carbon Oil. Flour. Feed. eto. Commercial
Block.
BLISS, JANES & CO.,
Coalers In Dry Goods, Groceries, Provisions
Boots 1 Shoes, etc.. Commercial liiook.
E. J. MERSHON.
nr.n .i)n.l nrnmtitl ti the Purchase. Insnect
ing and Shipment of Lumber from any point
on Saginaw riverj roei omre uurrm
EAST SAGINAW.
FRED A. KQ3HLER,
Blacksmith, and general operator in iron and
steel, Tuscola street,
LUTHER BECKWITH & JAS. R. COOK.
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law and Solictors
in Chancery, Ofllce over Wilklns A Co.'s Store,
AVater Street, jjai uu,Maii.
A. H. MERSHON,
Manufacturer of pump logs, feuoets, Ac. Salt
Blocks furnished to any extent desired, on
fair terms. Office at New Planing Mill, Wa
ter street,
F. W. CARLISLE A CO..
Tanners, Wholesale and Retail dealers in Tildes,
Leather and Findings, comer Water and Tus
cola Streets, East Saginaw, Michigan. Cash
lor aides ana rem
REAL ESTATE OFFICE,
WILLIAM N. LITTLE,
Exchange Block, East Saginaw, Miohigan, corner
Genesee and W ater Streets.
SHAW. BULLARD ft CO.
WHOLKSALK GUOCrcitS,
Burt Block, Water Street. East Saginaw.
eryl arjn st,jk of er erything in the line.
W. II. SOUTHWICK,
United States Asslatant Assessor for that pert of
Saginaw County lying east of Saginaw River.
Office at Ward A Southwick'i Tobacco and
Belting Store.
SA.ailSrA.AV CITY.
W. M. MILLER,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law, and F roe
tor in Admiralty. SAGINAW CITY.
A. S. OAYLORD,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law, Solicitor
in Chancery, Ao. . ' 8AQINAW CITY.
S. W. YAWKEY,
Commission Agents and Iealers in .
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, &c.
orner Office, Second Floor, Buena Vista Block
EAST SAGINAW, MICH.
Orders filled promptly and at Market Rates.
GOODING & HAWKINS,
FORWARDING, COMMISSION
AMD
General steamboat Agent.
Eatl Saginaw, ATi'oA.
D. W. GOODING. W. HAWKINS.
NEW GOODS,
NEW GOODS,
AT
E. P. & H. L. Penfield's,
Irving Block, Genesee Street.
SUMMER
DRESS GOODS.
BALMORAL SKIRTS,
KNIT GOODS,
WOOLEN nOSIERY & GLOVES,
Woolen Yarn, all Colors. -
BLANKETS,
BAGS,
FLANNELS,
Carpets,
Druggets. :
Wall Paper,
PAFER HANGINGS, &c, 4c, &c,
Also Agents for the Celebrated
FLORENCE SEWING MACHINE.
BURNKAM arTOOTT
Successors te Stevens, Pool A Co.
EVERETT BLOCK.
NEW AND ELEGANT STOCK OF
DRY GOODS,
CJLJRPE T S,
DRESS GOODS,
RARE SUL1L1ER FABRICS,
LADIES' FURNISHING GOODS
Summer Shawls &c.
The choicest assortment ever offered in this
market
EatSngiuow, Msy 18G6.
OUR STORE
Everett Block, Ccncce Street,
FIVE POORS SOUTH OF THE CORNER,
IS FULL OF 'CHOICE GOODS.
We offer especial Inducements to the Ladles in
lue way or
SHAWLS,
WORSTED GOODS.
TRIMMINGS,
And a rare variety of
DRESS GOODS,
Of erery itjla and quality, alio a full line of
Domestics!
Most Coniplete Assortment of
In the Valley. Also a fine Stock of TABLK AND
FLOOR OIL CLOTHS, l)KUUUbis, MAI 1 ixsu
Ac.
HOSIERY, HOOP SKIRTS, NOTIONS, Ac, Ao.
Wholesale and Retail,
AT
The Very Lowest Prices!
tTiCouatry Dealers and others will find it to
their advantage to give us a call.
, . BURNHAM & TOOL
n3T0
NOTICE.
IVTOTrCE is herehY riven that on the 2Sth dnv
JJN of May, 1806, I found by the shore of the
Saginaw River, in the Township of Koohville, in
the County of Saginaw, Michigan one Scow or
Llehtrr. the owner of which is unknown. This
notice is given in compliance with chapter 47, of
the compiled Laws of the Mate or Michigan,
entitled oT lost goods and stray iasu."
JOHN SHIELING
Dated this 28th day of Msy, 19C6.
E. THATCHER'S
Real Estato Column.
Office over More, ftallna, Mich., and
with llr. J. H. Curtis. No. 1U.
Croue Illock, 11. Hnglnaw.
vinn a T T
HCUSB and LOT on Mackinaw street, Sallna,
convenient to Street Railway; lately owned
by B. Smith. Price 12,000.
J. lUAilllE.lt.
FOR SALE.
0USK AND BARN, with Ixtj near Street
Kail way, la galina. rrtce .
it i i .. . Jt THATCHER.
TO RENT,
i TORE, for Dry Goods trade, and Stock of
) Goods for sale at Salina.
E. TIHTCI1ER,
FOR SALE. . -
OAA TOWN LOTS, in Salina. Prices low,
OvfvF terms easy.
E. THATCHER.
FOR SALE.
i f A ACRES Choice Land, 8 W Seetloa 3,
11)1 in Bncna Vista. Apply at my office in
Salina. ' 4 ' .
THATCHER.
FOR SALE.
OT 14, in block 16, in Gallarher's plat of
t Salina. K. THATCHER.
FOR SALE.
THE PROPERTY occupied by me at Salina,
with '.'00 feet front on City Railway, con
taining a good Two ?tory Double More, witn Vt
flee Rooms above, good Wood House, Barn and
Ice house. Also a well-nnUnert and convenient
Dwelling House. L THATCHER.
jxjjste, isee.
DKTHOIT AND MILWAUKKB
RAILROAD, in Connection with the New
and Powerful I'ppcr Cabin Steauishij 'Detroit''
and Milwaukee." '
Until further notice, trains will leave Holly, as
follows :
noir WEST,
Mall at 1:00 P. M. for Lansing A Milwaukee.
Mixed at 9:10 P. M. for Fentonville.
Mixod at 11:40 P. M., for Grand Ilaven.
going i:aht.
Mixed at 7:20 A. M for Detroit.
Aocotn. at 9:30 A. M. for Detroit.
Mail at 2:35 P. M. for Detroit
Express at 4:05 P. M. for Detroit.
HIecplug Care on all Night Trains.
REFRESHMENTS at Detroit, Owosso and
Grand Haven, and upon Company's ferry
Steamer on Detroit River.
Comfortable Hotel above Depot at Grand Haven
CONNECTION.
AT DETROIT, with Oreat Western and Orand
Trunk Railways for all points East Michigan
Central and Michigan Southern ItailmaUs.
AT MILWAUKEE, with the Milwaukee A
St. Paul, Milwaukee and Prairie Du Chien, and
Milwaukee A Chicsgo Railroads, for all points
West and Northwest.
sra7"Passcnrcrs forOrest Western Railway ro
on the Company's Ferry Steamer, at D. A M. R
K. Dock, at 10:15 A AI , and b. lU f. U.
V A. M. Ornc-KS JP(u.
THOS. BELL, Gen'l Sup't.
BROWN, HALL & JAMES
LAW & COLLECTION OFFICE,
Heal Estate,
AND '
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENCY
B. J. Brown,
SnTail,
James, y u
Jonath
ii 2 nu niock.
T. W
last Hnglnaw
Particular -A-ttention
GIVEN TO THE
PAYMENT OF TAXES
Procaring Abstracts of Title.
INSURANCE.
Fire and Marine Companies represented t
North America, of Philadelphia,
Underwriters,
Security,
Continental,
OF nSTEW "5TOir .
WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS,
Narragansott, of Providence,
Connecticut, of Hartford,
LUMBERMAN'S, OF CHICAGO.
LIFE Com' AMES:
The Old Connecticut Mutual,
Equitable, of New York,
NEW YORK ACCIDENTAL,
AND
Travelers' Insurance Company
or Providence, It. f.
THE KALIS' OF DALDACOA.
T H. W. LOlfOrCLLOW.
Into the city of Kambaln,
By the read that leadoth to Ispahan,
At the head of his dusty caravan, 0 '
Laden with treasure from realms afar,
BalJaoca an) Kelatand Kandahar,
Rode the great captain Alan.
The Kahn from his palace-window gased I
He saw ia the thronging street beneath,
In the light of the setting sun that biased,
Through the clouds of dust by the caravan raised,
The flash of harness and jeweled sheath,
And the shining scimitars of the guard, .
And the weary camels ihat bared their teeth,
As they psssed and passed through the gates un
barred'
Into the gates of the palaoe-yard.'
Thus into the dry of Kambslu
Rode the great captain Alau
And he stood before the Kahn and said, .
" The enemies of my lord arc dead
All the Kalifs or all the West
Bow and obey bis least behest
The plains are dark with mulberry trees,
The weavers are busy In Seraarcand,
The miners are sifting the golden sand,
The divers are plunging for pearls in the sees,
And peace and plenty are !n the land.
" Only Baldaooa'i Knlif alone
Rose in rebellion against thy throne
His treasures are at the palace door,
With the swords and the shawls and the jewels
. he wore f r
His body is dust o'er the desert blown.
" A mile outside of Beldooca's gate
I left my forces to lie in wait,
Concealed by forests and hillocks of sand,
And forward dashed with a handful of men,
To lure the old tiger from his den
Into the ambush, I bad planned.
Ere the town was reached the alarm was spread,
For we hsard the sound of gongs from within
With clash of cymbals and warlike din
The gates swung wlJe j we turned and fled,
And the garrison sallied forth and pursued,
With the gray old Kalif at their head,
And above the banner of Mahomed :
Thus we snared them all, and the town was sub
dued.
" As in at the gate we rode, behold,
A tower that was called the Tower of Gold!
For there the Kslif had hidden his wealth,
Heaped and hoarded, and piled on high,
Like sacks of whest in a granary
And there the old miser creep by stealth,
To feel of the gold that gave him health,
To gate and gloat with his hungry eye
On jewels that gleamed like a glow-worms spark,
Or the eyes of a panther in the dark.
I said to the Kalif Thou art old,
Thou hast no need of so uuuh gold
Thou should'stnot have heaped and hie'dsn it
here,
Till the breath of battle was hot and nesr,
But have sown through the laud these useless
boards, ..... .
And keep thine honor sweet and clear.
These grains of gold are not grains of wheat ,
These bars of silver thou canst not eat;
Those jewels and pearls and precious stones
Cannot cure the aches in thy bones.
Nor keep the feet of Death one hour
From climbing the stairways of thy tower! '
' Then into his dungoon I locked the drone,
And left him to feed there all alone
In the honey-cells of his golden hive
Never a prayer, nor a cry, nor a groan
Was heard from the massive walls of stone,
Nor again was the Kalif seen alive !
" When at last we unlocked the door,
Wo found him dead upon the fl. or ;
The rings had Gr ipped from his withered bands,
His teeth wire like bones in the deceit sands j
Still clutching his treosuiee he had died 1
And as he lay there, he sp eared
A statue of gold with a silver besrd,
His arms outstretched as if crucified."
This is the story, strange snd true,
That the great captain Alau
Told to his brother the Tartar Khan,
When he rode that day into Kainbalu
By the road that leadeth to Ispahan.
Atlantic for Junt.
Wast or Decision. A prcat deal
of labor is lost to the world fur the
want of a littlo courage. Every day
sends to their graves a number of ob
scure men, who have only remained
in obscurity because their timidity lias
prevented them from making a first
effort, and who, if they had only been
induced to begin, would in all proba
bility havo gne great lengths in the
career of fume. lho lact is, that in
doing anything in the world worth do
ing we must not stand shivering on
the bank, thinking of the cold and
danger, but jump in and scramble
through as well as we can. It will not
do to le perpetually calculating risks
and adjusting nice chances; it did all
very well before tho flood, when a man
could consult his friends upon an in
tended publication tor a hundred and
fifty years, and live to see its success
for six or seven conturies afterward;
but at proscnt a man waits and doubts,
and consults his brothef, ana his uu
clos, and his particular friends, till one
day he finds that he is sixty-five years
of ago, and that he has lost so much
time in consulting first cousins and
particular friends that he has no more
time to follow their advice. There is
so little time for ovcr-squeamishncss
at present, that the opportunity slips
away. The very period of life at which
a man chooses to venture, if ever, is
so confined that it is no bad rule to
preach up the necessity, in such in;
stances, of a little violence done to the
feelings, and efforts made in defiance
of such strict and sober calculations.
Sydney Smith.
ThB silk worm feeds upon the mul
bery leaf and spins his silk. The po
et feasts upon the world of nature,
and spins his beautiful thought and
fancies.
Feelings go and come like light
troops following the victory of the
present; but principles, like troops of
the lino, aro undisturbed and stonu
fust.
Manners What Not to Do.
The difference between the gentle
man and the clown consists not so
much in the breadth of thought and
noblenoss of nature on the one hand
with the absence of these on the oth
er, as may be supposed, but rather in
a thousand little things. Many, who
have excellent common sense in some
things, and even talent, make them
selves unacceptable to their frionds on
account of uncouth habits. .There is
no criminality in being awkward, but
it is a great inconvenience, at least
would be, if the man knew it. In a
brief period one may see a great many
things that excite his pity or awaken
his dingust. We know a person of
wealth who goes to church early, and
is suro to take out his knife and cut
and clean his fingernails beforo service
commences. We know another, who
has a classical education, who in
church uses his tooth-pick, not be
cause his teeth need picking, but sim
ply to keep himself occupied, as one
would twirl his watch-key, or as a la
dy would toy with her fan.
XSow, tooth-picking associations are
as tiaa as naii-cieaning. uui we
would rather Gee a person clean his
nails, even in company, than to see
a black streak under each finger-nail
on a lady's hand that flashed with
diamond rings ; but wo read in Scrip
ture of the jewel being in an unfit
place, and why should . they not be in
modern times r
Somo young men whistle in a ferry
boat or street car, and we have no
ticed nine times in ten, that the fools
who practice this aro deficient in mu
sical talent, and are not aware that
they are chafing the nervos of every
listen' r in two ways first, with the
bad music ; second, with the rawness
of the practice of porpotrating music
on people without any invitation and
without their consent.
Drumming with the fingers or with
the feet, making unnecessary noiso
among some pooplo who are nervous
render the society of persons who
thoughtlessly perpetrate these petty
rudenesses almost insufferable. We
are awaro that these habits ofter orig
inate in diffidence. The person feelsi
nervous, and does not know exactly
what to do but to practice this drum
ming as a kind of outlet or scapegoat
to nervousness. Well-bred people
may do this, but it is no Bign of good
breeding, and it iaprima facie evidence
of ill-breeding.
Sprawling the feet and legs in
company is another common and very
improper practice, u is an auhticuu
habit," known by the rule of putting
the feel as high as the head, or high
er. 1 asstner by hotel in rsew lorn,
Boston, or Philadelphia, one sees in
a sine-le window perhaps four pairs
of fvt, Md w hf Mm wotouilina
from a third story window a pair of
feet nad a foot of leg attached to each.
It is regarded in England as an of
fence against good taste to show the
bottom of tho 6hoo in company, and
therefore Englishmen are not likely
to so sit as to exhibit the bottom of
tho foot, much less retst one foot on
tho knee ; but go into a company of
(en or twelvo Americans, see what
awkward adjustment the men prcsont
with their feet and legs, and wo ask
... .1 il A Ml
no severer criticism man inai win
give on this bad habit.
Another bad practice in company,
or any where, is to lean back against
the wall, and hoist tho feet on the
round of the, chair, if it havo one.
We have seen many a nice mahogany
or rosewpod chair broken qlf at tho
back, by heavy louts leaning back on
the two hind legs but we beg par
don for having been caught in such
company. It tho habit were not un
couth, and if, tho chair did not break,
it would mar the wall.
lounging on sofa, and sitting, as
somo gentlemen do, on the small of the
back, is very rude. II a man wisnes
to recline on the sofa, let him lay
himself down, and gather up his feot,
as if he wero composing himself to
to sleep, or as if he wore drunk ; but
this sprawling, lounging, and leaning,
is execrable.
Picking the nose in company, or
usinir the handkerchief unnecessarily
or ostentatiously, and especially look
ing atlt after it has been used, need
not be condemned the very mention
of it is enough.
Persons frequently work at the
oars " belore lolks.' e rememwr
when a child, seeing ' a woman in
church put her littlo finger in her ear,
elevate iier elbow, ana give n one
grand shaking ; but though in was
before the days of daguerreotypes, it
was thoroughly uaeuerreotyped on
our memory.
Hawking, spitting, and clearing tho
throat may sometimes bo necessary,
even in public, but it should bo done
as quietly as possible, with tho hand-
kerchiof to the mouth. 1 owning,
stretching, putting tho hands in the
pockets, it will do for littlo boys with
their first pockets ; bnt when we see
men in tho pulpit, or on the platform,
thrust their hands in their trowsers
pocket, we can not say it is a sin, but
it is an uncouth habit.
riavincr with the pocket-knife,
jingling keys, and loose chatgo, are in
very bad taste. looking at the watch
in an open way makes one think a
person wishes to make a display of
that valuable article. It is considered
ill-manners to look at one's watch in
company, but we now speak of public
places, concerts, in church, etc., and
not private society. One may take a
peep at his watch in public places, if
he does it quietly, not to attract at
tention, and it is allowable. Ixud
talking is very rude on a ferry-boat,
in a railway car, at church, in the
lecture , or concert-room before the
services commence, ' and dotestable
afterward. Little parties should keep
their personal conversation to them
selves. Nothing, we think, shows
good-breeding more than a quiet man
ner, a mellow voice, and that decor-
ousness and gentleness which accom
pany that style of speech.
One more very common and yery
annoyiug habit may be named, and
that is, not going when one starts,
but standing in the door. Many a
cold has been taken . by the patient
lady of the house with nothing on for
protection, being detained by a gos
siping friend, sometimes ten minutes
to hear last words and confidential
communications ; talking thus in the
noise and roar of thestreet necessitates
loud talking, and sometimes the most
confidential things are heard all over
tho house, and even across the street.
"We remember, in particular, a fam
ily that lived ' next door to us. The
young ladies would stand on the steps
and talk, sometimes ten minutes, and
we were obliged to go away from our
open parlor windows, or hear all
their arrangements and confidential
conversations, and, forgive us for say
ing it, we have seen some people
make a display on the steps on pur
twse, as we thought, to attract atten
tion from people across tire way
they have talked loudly and laughed
heartily on purpose to make a display.
Never stand and talk when you
propose to go.
We have seen a delicate woman
rise to dismiss her company after
they had roached the door and " must
go right away we havo seen such a
lady stand till she turned pale with
fatigue,-while her visitors, ruddy and
strong, and jolly, would spin long
yarns, and then stop again in the cold
hall, and on the steps, and after
reaching the sidewalk. The proper
rule is, when you havo decided to
leave, to be off in sixty seconds.
Never keep a person standing in the
hall or at the parlor door, but take
leave of your friends where they are,
and go at once.
Tho Radical Republican Platform.
The Central Republican organ of
the State of New York the Albany
Journal thus lays down the program
of its party. It will bo seen that the
Journal does not try how not to say it,
but speaks right out in meeting. It
says :
" The Southern States must recog
nize tho freedom and equality of the
blacks. They must accept the princi
ples embodied in the proposed amend
ment of the Constitution. They must
establish sufficient guarantees for the
liberties that have been won by war.
They must enter into irrevocable obli
gations to surrender their pestilential
dogma of sovereignty, and to refrain
forever from attempted revolution.
Until they do these things, their p li
tical privileges will not bo restored to
them they can have no representa
tion in the Federal Government, and
inuai l.a ounaulured in fcntagoniaru with
the Union, and requiring oversight
and repression." - f
The Journal is very plain, and lays
down with truthfulness the real plat
form of its party. The Southern States
"can have no representation in the
Federal Government, and must be
considered in antagonism with the
Union, and requiring oversight and
repression," until they shall recognize,
not only tho freedom which they
havo dono but, also, the "equality of
the blacks" until they shall "accept
tho principles embodied in the pro
posed amendment of the Constitution"
until they shall "establish sufficient
guarantees for the liberties that have
been won by war," (what are they?)
until they shall enter into "irrevoca
ble obligations to surrender their pes
tilential dogma of sovereignty, and to
refrain forever from attempted revolu
tion." These must bo dono before the
Southern States can be allowed Rep
resentatives and Senators in Congress,
or be relieved of military rule.
It is well that the points of the
coming political contest aro so well
defined. There is to be no restoration
of tho fraternal relations between the
States North and South.
No restoration of the Union.
No Union, but in its place section
alism. No representation in Congress of
tho Southern States.
No withdrawing of military surveil
lance, oversight and repression from
tho outh.
Until the Southern States shall have
put the blacks on an equality, civilly,
politically and otherwise, with the
whites, and done certain other things
to secure equality to the blacks and to
provide against revolution in the fu
ture, "their political privileges will
not bo restored to them."
Which programme, if successful at
the polls, will endanger the peace of
the country and the permanency of
the Government; will require the con
tinuation of high taxes to support a
large standing army and a horde of
L'uderal oihcials scattered through the
South; will require high tariff to sup
port the heavy expenses of the Gov
ernment, and to give bounties to New
England manufacturers; will secure
to tho holders of Government bonds
continuod exemption from State and
municipal taxation, and will koep the
industry, trade and business of the
country in an unsettled state for years
to come. We aro but entering upon,
instead of emerging from, an agita
tion that is revolutionary in its ten
dencies, and which cannot be other
wiso than detrimental to the public
welfare. Such is the entertainment
to which the Radical Republicans in
vite the people. Cin. qirer.
Never offer to intrude, by words of
untimely sympathy, uton a grief borne
as nieu bear it, and felt as women feel
it.
We don't see why a lady in crino
line should go abroad for companion
ship. Let Lei b content in her own
circle.
Many ladies who think themselves
unablo to walk a mile, would gladly
uanco uiree uuies mat uiaiumv.
. Slander as a Causa of Disunity.
SSBBBSBSSSSSS-
Uniropressible as are the American
people if they can, with truth, be
said to be unimpressible and weak
as are the great majority of the pub
lic journals of the country, it is not to
be disputed that the press of the Unit
ed States wields a vast influence over
the popular mind. It is capable of
great good ; it is also capable of mighty
evil. Indifferent as are the greater
share of its articles, and threadbare
and narrow as is its philosophy, it can
by constant repetition of the same
statements and ideas, at length fix
them upon thelommon memory, and
make them the springs of action in
matters in which the fate of the nation
may be involved.
The public journal is at once the
creator and the collaborator of the
popular orator. The orator draws
upon the journal for his resources, and
the journal upon the orator. 'Inca
ses of agitation, the difference between
thorn is, that the one represents the
individual, the other the class ; the one
is the demagogue, the other the scum
of all demagogery.
Had there been upon neither side
newspapers ana popular .orators to
stir the publio mind by untrue state
ments or unsound deductions from
known facts, there would have been
no jealousies between the Isorth and
the South, no abolition excitement
and no war. It required years of
falsehood and misconstruction and ex
aggeration to bring on a state of ac
tive hostility. The means of propo
gating slander and intensifying hatred
in the absence of these two imple
ments, would have been insufficient
to bring on a conflagaration. As it
was, it is not necessary to inquire up
on which side the means wero usod
mo6t unscrupulously. We are speak
ing of the result which they produced
war and its consequences of mutual
injury and collective insolvency. The
truth which we desire to impress is
this : that continued .malign agitation
in this country leads to war. It has
done so once ; there is no reason to
doubt that it is capable of doing so
again.
The refore it is that we condemn the
efforts that are continually being
made by the press and orators of the
nepuuucan parry, to Keep oeiore tne
people of the North the real or unreal
sins, follies and misdoings of the peo
ple of the Southv Why this continual
overhauling of old accounts? why
this constant and laborous presenta
tion of incitements to hatred, distrust
and susnicion. if not to nernotuate a
condition of enmity ? Admitting that
there are men in the South whose
passions are immoderate, and whose
words are intemperate : is it just al
ways to assume that these passions
and these words truly represent the
Fouth in its collective capacity ?
-. W Jnovr! bliwa tbe without
mutual tolerance there can be no per
manent union of these States ; and
that any temporary union will be a
source of infinite distress and expense
It is due to the conquering party to
set the example of forbearance. More
than we can express, we regret the
narrowness and want of magnanimity
which characterizes the entire Repub
lican press and body of popular ora
tors. The tene of the North, as it is
spoken through their vehicles, is that
of a pooplo who have not been re
venged half enough who havo yet
hatreds to feed and enmities to satisfy,
and who are resolved to koep open an
avenue to further satisfaction. If we.
were ablo to discover any, the slight
est, wish for the restoration of a desi
rable unity, we would not hesitate to
confess it ; but we do not. The Union
looks farther off than ever, and is
daily, to all appearance, receding in
to the regions of utter hopelossncss.
hat wo would like to know is,
whether the people of tho North do
really take pleasure in this multipli
cation of the literature of Southern
hatred and disloyalty.
Ihis elaborate slander for even
the presentation of facts becomes de
famatory when it is carried to ex
tremes, or is made for an injurious
purpose is war. It is the meanest
and most despicable species of war.
It is a war that cowards can prosecute,
and which, to prosecute, is a sign of
cowardice. It is even more inimical
to national unity than a conflict of
arms. Friendships were formed, and
lessons of mutual tolerance learned
in the midst of actual hostilities ; but
here is no room for such meliorating
influences. It is a work purely of in
jury, for which there is no compensa
tion ; a cause which is to be worked
out in unhappy effects in a long and
ominous future. Cin. Enquirer.
Hint to Letteb Writers. By the
lute act to amend the l'ostal laws; it is
provided th&t postmasters shall re
turn to the writers, free of cost, all
letters not called for, when requested
to do so by the person mailing them.
Persons mailing letters should boar
this in miud and write on them a re
quest to the postmaster to return the
letter to them if not delivered ia any
number of days they may choose to
mention. By this course luuch delay
and anxiety may often be avoided.
Better send the young virgin, with
her wreath of rosebuds, her tender
nesa, her ignorance of life's sufferings
her dream-pictures of a holy Eden,
into tho graveyard of earth, which is
God's field, than into the waste places
of life.
The moral and apprehensive nature
of girls is more rapidly developed than
the mind eft boys, as... satellites move
faster than planets, or as flowers
bloom sooner in valleys than on moun
tains. At tines, it needs only a few oold
drops of cold words to make the hot
flowing soul, upon the contact of the
strange, cold bodies, scatter likejuol
ten lead in cigzag and globulos.
Republican Muddle' lu tho Sixth
District.
Correspondence ef the Detroit Free Press.
Fust, Aug. 2. 18G0.
Matters here in regard to the Con
gressional District Convention are get
ting somewhat mixed among the im
maculate Republicans, as to who shall
have the honor to represent us in the
next Congress. ' We have three dis
tinguished individuals dosiring tho
honor, First, the honorable gentle
man that now represents us, lion.
John F. Driggs, of East Saginaw.
Second, Hon. James Biraey, of Bay
county. Third, the late lrovost Mar
shal of the' District, Strickland, of St.
Johns.
Driggs is going In on the strength
of what he has done. Birney on what
his father has done. Strickland on
his nerve. . ' v
Dritrgs claims that he has already
a great national reputation. Birney
claims the same for his father. Strick
land thinks he can make one if ho has
a chance.
Between Driggs and Birney thoro
happens to be a most bitter feud; thov
are as fond of each other as the devil
is of consocrated eloments. Driggs is
too much of a political figurer for
Birney. The reason is obvious. Driggs
was educated in Tammany Hall; Bir
ney in a theological seminary. Birney
may be a good priost, but a poor poli
tician. The good book says : " Oh ! that
mino enemy would wrfto a book."
Some two years sinco, Birney, think
ing himself the most abused, and at
the same Eime the moat able man irt .
the District to renresont ius in Con
gress, wroto a book detailing all his
grievances and troubles, particularly
thoso relating to the Hon. John F.
how John had cheated him out of fho
nomination, and all that. John had
undoubtedly all tho time been praying
for this same thing that is the book.
How remarkably his prayer was an
swered. He must be a pious cuss.
Jim says, if John is nominated, he
will run on a stump ticket against .
him, and has already sjnt round his
little circulars to those he thinks aro
his friends, asking them for signatures
to that effect
Every year about applo time you
see Jim about figuring for some poli-,
tical nice, and he generally comes out
of the conventions, and front before
the people, as tho man did some years
since, who took a large dose of Bran
dreth's pills with as little left. Tho '
doses his political friends administer
to him are terrific. But he recuper
ates before the next two years wears
round, and is again ready for another
trial. John undoubtedly has the in-
side track. He relies on the efforts
he has made for tho mining interest
t Im.V Superior in him votee on th
tariff ; his vote for more pay in apolo
gised for, that a Representative can
not sustain his reputation (without his
family) in Washington, as a bully
member of the Republican party, for
less than five thousand a year. I very
much doubt if he can. But John,
Jim and Strick, all three, are bound
to bo disappointed. The man who will
finally receive tho nomination is Col.
William B. McCrccry, the present
popular mayor of this city. Modest
and unassuming, not seeking tho nom-
ination himself, the young men of the
party (not the wire pullers) aro deter
mined to secure it for him. He is
far superior to either of the other men
in education, and natural abilities. .
Educated for the bar, he was, admit
ted to practice just at tho breaking
out of the rebellion; and had he cho
en to follow it, his succes in the law
would have equaled that in the field.
His bravery and gallantry as a com
manding officer, his imprisonment in
Lib by and remarkablo escape, are too
familiar to the peoplo of the district
to be repeated. My only hope is ho
will not be nominated, for he, or any
other Republican, is bound to be de
feated; but if his friends desire to sac
rifice him it is no fault of ours. ,
His friends claim that he is entittled
to it He has tamed it by his services '
in the field. They also say the
county is entittlod to it, it boing the
largest and strongest Republican conn
ty in the district. Bay county is De
mocratic, Saginaw about equally bal
anced, and if there is a Republican
majority to bo obtained in the district
it must como out of Genesee.
My only hopo is that there will bo
such a general row grow ont of this
muddle as to onable tho Democracy
te send a man to the next Congress
who will represent the district honest-
ly, doing credit to the district and
State, which is moro than can be said
for the past few years.
Occasional.
The thousand watchful nights and
other sacrifies by which a mother gives
a hero or a poet to the state are for
gotten, not once counted; the mother
herself does not count them; and so;
one century after another,mothcrs un
named and nnthanked, send forth the
arrows, the stars, the storm-birds, and
the nightingales of time.
Sculptors have to strike almost in
numerable blows upon the marble
block to develop the statue that is hid
den within it Shoolmasters are apt
to think they must treat an urchins
body in the same way to develop his
mind.
Josh Billings remarks with as much
good' feeling as truth, that "in the
good old daze there wui more fun in
thirty cents than there is now in 7
dollars and a half."
The hard strata of circumstances
through which ones life rill most
needs filter and force its way,' may
make it purer and clearer just as all
hard strata are filtcring-stonesof water.

xml | txt