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Lawrence democrat. (Lawrenceburg, Tenn.) 1884-1925, April 17, 1912, Image 2

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The LawrencEturg Democrat
i i in.im ii w riM v.
"LAWULNCXLUiJO. TIINNl.&StE
FIGHTING MACHINES.
It ! a half century Mnre Erlcmon's
Monitor was launched. SVe have Just
passed the anniversary of tti.it event.
It wui an rvolutlon in the art of naval
armament which at the time seemed
to promise a permanent rhange In
theory and practice. What the
Monitor did for ua In the crisis which
It wag designed to meet U matter of
history, says the Ponton Pout. That
low-lying, vicious craft wai perhaps
the salvation of our navy. Hut what
a change In the ears that have since
elapsed! The Monitor type ting gone
to the scrap heap, and the massive,
towering, stupendous dreadnought haa
taken lta place. Torpedohoats have
come In, followed by torpedo de
stroyers. And the range of naval op
erations haa been extended. Every
maritime nation haa equipped Itself
with submarines, and the very latest
is a aubmarine that can tight above
the water and descend with safety
after delivering tbe Ore of Hi battery.
,Under tbe water and above the land
In tbe air the power of destruction Is
extending. What la the end of this
development of tfte moans of devasta
tion? Logically, ia It not the estab
lishment of universal peace aa an In
ternational duty?
Wherever the Romans lived In tbe
days of tbe empire tbey carried luxury
and art. They occupied for centuries
a large part of tbe northern coast of
Africa. Jt is not surprising therefore
to learn by a dispatch from Tripoli
that a body of Italian troops digging
trenches near the Oasis of Sclara, on
tbe spot formerly occupied by Koman
Imperial gardens, has unearthed an
ancient Greek Venus of remarkable
beauty. Tbe bead and arms are miss
ing, but tbe torso Is in excellent
preservation and reminds beholders of
tbe famous Capltollne Venus. Tbe
statue bas been sent to Rome, where
It will be placed in tbe National
museum. In nearly every spot where
soldiers have tapped tbe ground to
. throw up defensive works they have
uncovered traces of the ancient Ro
man occupation of Tripoli, including
tombs, mosaics and ruins of splendid
villas.
There Is a New York statute against
the revelation by physicians of the se
crets of the consultation room; but a
New York judge bas decided that it
does not prevent a doctor from de
scribing tbe services which he has
performed when be finds it necessary
to sue for the collection of his fee. In
that case, the Judge rules, the phy
sician may proceed with his action, al-
leglng anything and everything that Is
necessary, without either directly or
Indirectly becoming liable for viola
tion of tbe law. The decision would
seem to be reasonable. It is a mean
man who will refuse to pay a fair fee
to bis doctor.
A Greeley, Colorado, man claims to
bave perfected a seedless watermelon
and la cow experimenting with pea
nuts crossed with sweet peaa. He ex-
pects to get blossoms and peanuts
from the same vines, the peanuts
growing above ground Instead of in
the earth. He has hopes of producing
a succotash plant by crossing corn and
beans, nnd looks forward to growing a
breakfast food which will include tbe
qualities of coffee. In the meantime,
Where's Luther Burbank?
i
A Dutch prisoner, who was taking
walking exercise in the courtyard of
the Conclergerle Prison at Paris, eud
denly made a running Jump at the
wall, which Is 14 feet high and topped
with iron spikes, mounted it like at
cat, to the amazement of the Jailers,
Jumped down on the other side, climb
ed 20 feet up a wire ladder, dropped
by accomplices from an open window,
and got away. He must be a real fly
ing Dutchman.
Girls in a Massachusetts college
have rejected the cap and gown as
graduation garb In favor of the white
dress, on the ground that tbe latter is
more becoming. This will be another
proof to the skeptical that higher edu
cation for women Is a rank failure.
A physician remarks of a prominent
Invalid that his days are numbered,
though nobody can tell how many re
main. That might be also said with
perfect truth of the healthiest man In
the land. '
A boy who ran away from his home
at New Haven, Conn., twenty years
ago returned the other day with $2,
000,000. It is understood that his
father did not meet blm at the gate
with a rtrap.
By hurling a custard pie into the
face of a would-be robber a waitress in
a Denver restaurant half-blinded him
and saved the money In the cash box
As a weapon of defense the custard
pie deserves the highest encomiums.
A Kansas dentist Is reported to have
discovered how to sause new teeth to
grow In the Jaws of people who have
lost the ones with which nature fur
nished them. Let those who have
swallowed their false teeth hope on.
A curfew law for husbands is advo
cated by a North Carolina man. But
home Is the peculiar domain of wo
men, and the average husband will
continue to show bis gallantry by not
"tachlng on a woman's preserve?
HELEN GOULD TO THE RESCUE
r
v
; w
for herself, and Is accompanied by some
She will see and study for the first
have their center in San Francisco. With her are a number of eastern finan
ciers and railroad men, with whom she will advise.
On her trlt) to the coast Miss Helen
the head of the Gould properties. In
the Missouri Pacific and the Denver ft
Western Pacific; K. T. Jeffery, president of the Western Pacific chairman
of the financial board of the Rio Grande and chief financial adviser to the
Goulds; Charles H. Schlacks, first vice
of the Denver ft Rio Grande..
Until now Miss Gould has remained
which ber family bas been Involved. Her chief concern has been her philan
thropic work.
When it looked as though the Missouri Pacific would be lost to George
Gould, he was able to Interest Speyer ft Co., and they raised $23,000,000 to
put into the property. Then attention was turned to the Denver ft Rio
Grande. A system of financing, has Just been completed by which from
$10,000,000 to $25,000,000 will be available.
The Western Pacific remains to be
assistance of Miss Gould. She has practically agreed to use ber entire per
sonal fortune, estimated at $20,000,000, to help restore the family credit.
Miss Gould Is credited with having
necessary, to preserve the heritage that
HEAD OF VERY
Sadness and gloom have been the
portion of a large section of the
American Society (be careful of the
large S!), since the publication of
that remarkable book "The 469 Ultra
Fashionables of America," compiled
by Charles Wilbur de Lyon Nichols,
on whose shoulders haa fallen the
mantle of Ward McAllister, inventor
of New York's "400." The cream of
the cream of American society have
now been segregated, cornlled, re
concentrated or otherwise abstracted
from the common herd and seated on
high in the splendor and dazzling
radiance of Mr. de Lyon Nichols, au
gust approval. There appears to be,
however, a remarkable lack of Inven
tion displayed in the New York list
of 300 notables. It is confined prac
tically to the guests who were invited
to meet the Connaughts and Princess
Patricia on their recent visit. Surely
New York is going to the dogs when
it can only muster a beggarly 300.
Even Ward McAllister, In an earlier and less enlightened period, permitted
the metropolis to have a sacred circle of 400. The reason may be that only
the superfine ultra-fashionables are Included in Beau Nichols" arbitrary selec
tion, and that those unfortunates who are at all tainted with the Btlgma of
6lowness, who do not fully subscribe to the modern doctrine of "eat, drank
and be merry, for tomorrow we die," are dropped relentlessly. Possibly the
compiler's wisdom did not wholly desert blm and he hesitated to embark on
the stormy waters of the next stratum below, being assured of countenance
and support by the precedent already established.
KING PETER
At the foreign office and In the
ronsnirnries are denied, of course. "It
one official, who Has most anxious to
tions existed between Peter and the army and Peter and bis people. But
talk in the cafes, converse with officers to whom you have been vouched for
or ask any representative of the common Servians, xne woraing people, ana
one finds little praise for Peter.
"Servia wants to become a republic,''
the people are tired of the dynasty."
RULER OF SMALLEST STATE
By the death of William Alexander,
Grand Duke of Luxemburg, which oc
curred recently, a demure young
woman not yet 18 becomes sovereign
of that little principality. She Is the
late ruler's eldest daughter, the Grand
Duchess Marie. Luxemburg Is a state
of 998 square milea in tbe angle where
Germany. France and Belgium meet
It has about 250,000 people. From
time immemorial it has been an ap
panage of the House of Nassau. It
was therefore virtually part of Hol
land, though separated from it until
the death of Queen Wilhelmina's
father In IS'JO. Then It followed the
male line to the father of the grand
duke Just dead. In 1907 the succes
sion in the female line was Instituted
by a family statute.
At a time, some years ago, when It
seemed likely that Queen Wllhelmlna
of Holland, would be childless, she
designated this young grand ducbess
as heir to the throne of the Nether
lands and was about to ask the Dutch states general to pass the necessary
legislation to this end. Shortly afterward, however, the hones of the Dutch
people for a direct heir to the throne
Princess Juliana.
Tbe grand duchess Is described
advice, quick tempered and impulsive
the royal busy bodies w ho aro aiready
able Lubband.
0H
Miss Helen Gould, philanthropist,
one of the best loved among Amer
ican women and possessor of minions,
haa come forward to save the family
fortunes from possible wreckage and
to restore the prestige of the family
name.
At the very moment when the finan
cial downfall of the family is impend
ing she has offered to cast her per
sonal fortune fnto the breach to stay
the threatened calamity.
In so doing she has chosen to for
get and to forgive all that has oc
curred to alienate one member of the
family from the others. She Is in
spired by her own bounty of heart
and by the deep reverence In which
she holds her father's memory.
Miss Gould lert New York the other
day In her private car for San Fran
cisco, for It Is there that tbe arrange
ments will be made by which the
lamlly finances will be straightened
out. She is going to look over things
prominent financiers.
time the great Gould properties thai
Gould is accompanied by the men at
the party are n. F. Bush, president of
Rio Grande and future president oi tne
president of the Western Pacific and
free of the financial enterprises In
financed and It will be done through the
said that she will give every cent, If
her father bequeathed them.
SMARTEST SET
-,.. . 4- 1
X- Jl
IS IN TROUBLE
Is the bloody drama of 1903 about
to be repeated in Belgrade? That ia
a question that all Europe, Including
Servian people themselves, are ask
ing. For weeks reports have emanat
ed from Belgrade that a conspiracy
has been formed among the officers of
the army having for its purpose the
dethronement of King Peter, if nec
essary, by as violent means as those
of the terrible night nine years ago,
when King Alexander and Queen
Draga were murdered in the palace.
King Peter is paying for whatever
guilty knowledge he may have had of
the regicide plot with uneasy days
and sleepless nights. Now In his
sixty-eighth year, he is wondering If
it was worth while after all, to trade
his peace of mind as a private citizen
In Switzerland, for th? bloody crown
of Servla. Through the palace still
stalks the restless ghost of Alexander
and the king's ears must still resound
the echo of the shrieks of Draga.
war ministry all knowledge of plots and
la a sensational newspaper ne, saia
leave the impression that the best rela
one army omcer saia. i ne army ana
3f
were gratified by the birth o'f tbe little
as an unusually pretty girl, impatient oi
characteristics which greatly displeas
occupied in selecting for ber a suit.
v- r- V .
SBmM
AND mJt
BOX FOR STAMPING LETTERS
Apparatus Invented for Benefit of
Man Who Never Has Stamps
Works Automatically.
For the benefit of those people who
never have any stamps or, rather, for
tbe benefit of the people they borrow
stamps from a New York man haa
invented tbe apparatus seen In the Il
lustration. This Is nothing less than
Letter Stamping Box,
a letter stamping machine, which,
when a coin or coins am dropped in
the slot, will automatically affix a
stamp In an envelope. The urper sec
tion of the box has a coin slot at the
top and in s lower corner, back of a
little window, a roll of stamps. A
slot at one end admits the letter and
the window allows the user to see
that the corner of the envelope is ex
actly in front of the roll of stamps.
A coin Is inserted and tbe plunger at
the top of the box pushed down. This
presses the end stamp against a mols
tener, and from there on to tbe enve
lope, which Is then withdrawn and
dropped Into the lower compartment
for collection.
FISHING WITH A STEAM PUMP
Each 8troke of Piston Brought Up
Torrents of W-ter In Which
Were Fish and Crawfish.
One of the most singular fishing de
vices Imaginable was discovered by
accident in France. Though extreme
ly simple, the system Is revolutionary,
says the Scientific American.
A pond on the farm of La Marle-
quette, bordered by rocky shores, was
drained one year by the aid of a
steam pump. Each stroke of the pis
ton drew up 25 gallons of water, and
the pond was emptied In a few hours,
and not only was the water drawn off,
but all the fishes also were transferred
to a new element.
This was a revolution. The owners
of ponds In the neighborhood followed
suit, and the proprietor of tbe pump
made a specialty of this sort of work.
He "let" one of bis pumps, uioJIfied
for the purpose. The peasants of the
region called it "tbe fish pump." Each
stroke of th piston brought up tor-
renta of water. In which were fish and
crawfish, together with mud and de
bris. One pond of several acres was
cleared of fish at an expense of about
$7 20. The process was Ingenious, but
as one cannot bave bis Aeb and eat
It, too, and as such rapid consumption
would have led to equally rapid ex
termination, the authorities stopped
the practice.
NEW CLOCK FOR TIMEKEEPER
Found Quite Convenient When Time
of Workmen Wanted Expressed
' in Dollars and Cents.
FROM THE SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN
It Is quite Inconvenient, when figur
ing the time of workmen, to have the
time expressed in hours and minutes,
which la a duodecimal system, while
Hit labor i.t paid for In Collars and
cents on the decimal system. This
difficulty has been very simply over
come by an Inventor In Louisville, Ky.,
who has fitted a clock with a face
showing the ordinary 12-hour num-
A Timekeeper's Clock.
bers, and outside of this ten divisions
representing the decimal system. The
time of this clock is read not in hours
and minutes, but in hours and tenths
of hours. For instance, a workman
starting a Job at 9 30 would be record
ed as started at 9.5. If he completed
th Job at 12.3, the difference in time,
namely, 2.8 hours, Is evidently far
more simple to calculate that. It would
be were it expressed In minutes.
Smoke Consuming Furnaces.
There are 7,875 smoke consuming
furnaces in London. Fifty-four dif
ferent types of apparatus are used In
the metropolis, all of which are ef
fettlve smoke consumers. Up to the
date of issuing the report from which
these figures come 672 convictions for
smoke nuUances had been obtained
before the magistrates.
Consumption of Coal.
Last year the consumption of coal
in this country was 582,000,000 tons in
round numbers, in England 300,000,000
tons, nearly, and In Germany about
two hundred and fifty million tons.
FURS ARE MADE MOTH-PROOF
6kln Is Removad by Freezing Process
snd Hairs Mads Quite Unaaiail
abls by Vermin.
A European scientist has evolved
plan whereby furs can be made abso
lutely moth-proof. It Is ouly the skin
to which tbe fur Is attached that at
tracts tbete creatures. Tbe Ides,
therefors. suggests Itself to substitute
some otbr material not adapted as
food for vermin, in place of the nU
ural skin, and bas been successfully
accomplished In the following man
ner: The fur Is stretched upon a
wooden frame and Is then dlypefl. hair
side down, In a Cat dish, the dish be
ing filled with water and placed, with
tbe fur, In a refrigerating rnom and
allowed to freeze. When tt.i fur Is
frozen to a solid block tbe skin Is
sawed ofT with a circular saw. It can
be further utilized for the nanufac
ture of leather. The surface of the
Ice block is allowed to melt down a
small distance so as to bring out the
ends of the hairs, and then a number
of layers pf rubber solution are ap
plied. After this bas set tbe ice
block is melted off, leaving the hair
firmly rooted in the rubber. The re
sult perfectly resembles natural fur,
but differs from It In being quite un
assailable by vermin.
PUNCTURELESS TIRE IS NEW
Kansas City Man Has Invented Wheel
With Cushion of Air Inside
Is 8oft-Rldlng.
Ever since a man discovered bow to
make a soft-rldlng tire by wrapplnir
the product of the rubber tree around
compressed air, other men have been
trying to devise a way to protect that
sofe-rldlng device from damaging con
tact with the unfeeling roadway, Its
tin cans snd broken glass and sharp
stones, and so on.
One of the most recent devices Is In
vented by E. Stewart of Kansas City.
Mr. Stewart has a pneumatic tire, all
right, but he hides It away In the
vheel, so that th'e only surface It en
counters is of smooth metal, adjusted
Tire Inside the Wheel.
so there is no chafing. The outer rim
is shod with an ordinary solid rubber
tire. Mr. Stewart says the hidden
pneumatic tube does all the work of
one exposed to tbe road, absorbing
shocks and Jars, and that it will last
Indefinitely. He has equipped his
pleasure car with the device and Is
demonstrating it to factory repre
sentatives and other interested per
sons. Heating and Cooling House.
By the use of a Swiss invention
which has been recently exploited,
the system made use of in winter
for heating a house by hot water
may bo utilized in the summer
months for cooling the Interior. The
piping is used Just as it stands, but
the boiler Is cut out and its place
tal:en by an apparatus which com
prises the essential part of the inven
tion, called a "frlgator." The water
which circulates in the pipes in the
winter months is displaced with
brine for cooling, which is main
tained in motion by a small pump.
The device has been given a practical
test and found to be quite successful.
NOTES OF
SCIENCE
AND
NYENTION
The United States spends every
year $11,500,000 for education in art
aJone.
An Italian university professor
claims to have found radium In ordi
nary dew.
If blindfolded, it is said 'no man is
able to stand five minutes without
moving.
A method of planting eyelashes and
eyebrows bas been developed by a
French surgeon.
In eastern Turkestan sheep are used
as common beasts of burden. They
are said to be excellent carriers.
Cold air contains more oxygen than
warm air, requires fewer respirations
and consumes less, heart energy.
A patent has been granted for an
attachment to rocking cnairs, which
onerates a fan to cool the occupant
A piano will be less affected by
dampness if set against an inside
wall of a room than If against an out
side wall.
It has been found that the eye of a
fly is able to see an object no larger
than one flve-mmiontn oi an men in
diameter.
Any attempt to turn the knob or
Insert a key tnto a lock that a New
Yorker recently patented rings a bur
glar alarm.
Nearly a thousand patents bave
been Issued in the United States for
devices to do away with tbe rubber
tires on automobl'es and other vehicles.
GIVING. NEEDED COLOR
EFFECTIVE ADORNMENT FOR
THE SIMPLE SHIRTWAIST.
Fabric That Introduces thes Gown
Color Is Far Smarter Than the'
All White Pretty Brooches
and Bows,
The illustration shows the fancy
version of the Peter Pan, the front
being cut In a novel way and tbe
pocket left off, and thla model would
be most effective In a striped silk
matching the suit color.
As to shirtwaist colors, we will
not be able to escape all white, snd
The Blocking at the Front of This
Waist Gives a Little Chance for
Extra Dressiness.
a fresh white waist certainly gives a
business woman a neat and smart
look when employed with her duties;
WHITE VEILED OVER BLACK
Smart Milliners Give Distinctive
Touch to Their Productions by
Simple Arrangement.
White maline veiled with black ma-
Hne bas lately been seen on many of
the creations of smart milliners, two
immense outstanding loops of the ma
terial being an Indispensable part of
the decorations of any hat on which it
appears. Rhinestones are frequently
used with it and are extremely effec
tive with the sombre tone produced
by the black over white. One hat is
made entirely of the maline and Is
trimmed only with the two big loops
and a string of large rhlnestones
around the crown. Another model Is
a tiny bowl of stretched black satin.
which is wound about the edge with
folds of maline and adorned at the
back with tbe two big loops. The
folds that surround tbe hat are held at
two points by big rings of rhlnestones.
Brown maline over white is also seen,
having been used on one large hat
with a crown of dark brown velvet
and a brim of gold lace. Voluminous
twisted folds of the maline encircle
the crown and two loops of propor
tions to suit those of the hat cast
their shadow over it.
Pretty Evening Scarfs.
Absolutely inexpensive, yet pretty,
for summer evening wear use are
shaped scarfs made from squares of
colored silk mull. Hem the edges and
up each side of the front in an inch
and a half wide hem, and above it put
an inch-wide strip of valenclennes or
Imitation cluny insertion. Use white
Ilk tassels or knotted ends of ribbon
finished In small ribbon flowers.
Plaited Skirts.
Plaited and accordion plaited
skirts loom large on the horizon v
of fashion. Sometimes in a $
front panel. Sometimes in ax
deep ruffle, hut always with the ?
? plaits held in at the bottom by Jj
& a band of ribbon or by hidden 5
g catches. Vogue.
For the Young Girl.
The latest In halrdressing is the
Mona Lisa effect, copied in modifica
tion from the celebrated painting
which was stolen from the Louvre, in
Paris, with the parted hair in front
jid the large flat knots at eltber side
entirely covering) tbe ears and ex-
ending down to the neck.
The bang or fringe effect continues
to be popular. A Dutch effect in hair
dressing has the hair parted from tbe
orehead to the nape of tbe neck, with
knots Just covering tbe ears, and baa
nserted underneath the balr divisions
at the front an unusually long and
If 1
"Ti'fiy
1 , .ft yl,
hut all white Is far Icbh umart than a
fabric Introducing the gown color In
some manner, and aa a Mandby one
bodice lu a silk exactly matching tbe
ault would be Invaluable. This conies
In very handy for rainy days and for
tho moment w hen a white waist would
seem a little too commonplace, lor
with a change of neck fixing the get
up ran bo made far more tlresny.
Among the smart whcIi shirting
whoae patterns match the colors or
the new suit materials are madras
and cheviot, the browns, blues and
plum tones of the pin stripes, chocks
and dots and diamonds showing up
very handsomely against tbe wbite
background. blrts in these fabrics
are always laundered without starch
and very often the neck finish Is in
the form of a soft sto k with ends
made for a four in band tie. Stiff linen
collars are likewise worn with soft
laundered shirts, and with silk and
flannel ones, but tbe woman who bas
the beauty of her throat In mind pre
fers the more pliable stock of the
shirt material or of Irish lace, for al
though a lace neck fixing takes away
something of the distinction of a tail
ored waist tbe Irish stocks are much
worn.
For little extra occasions, when the
silk four in-hand te seems scarcely
dressy enough, there are charming
butterfly bows in plain and lace-edged
muslin and net, and girls who know
how to make their own little neck
fixings often turn these out from
bordered handkerchiefs and make
them in a way so that they wash with
out hurt. The pretty little brooches
and bows with ends of satin Bowers
are still gayer neck fixings, and, be
sides being In excellent tiiHte for oc
casional wear, these are easily made
at home from any little fragment of
gay satin or ribbon.
MARY DEAN.
NOVELTY FOR DINNER TABLE
Quint Ornamentation Charming In Its
Simplicity Flowers Appear
With the Dessert
A well known hostess the other
night placed a number of rare Dres
den china birds about hef table, and
very quaint and pretty they looked,
affording her guests no little amuse
ment. Not a flower was visible until
dessert, when the finger glasses ww.
brought in. Each finger glass was
trimmed with a single row, around
the edge, of flowers and the flowers
were different In each case yellow
Jonquils in one finger glass, pink car
nations in a second, gardenias in a
third, violets in a fourth, snowdrops
in a fifth and so on.
It Is now the mode, by the way, not
to set a handful of flowers in any
vase or bowl, or otherwise to fill one
up. The most popular arrangement Is
to put flowers In singly all around the
edge of the tase or bowl.
ELABORATE HAIR DRESSING
Charming Theater Coiffure of Pearls,
Silver and Lace.
Summer Skirts.
Advance models in summer skirts
are all slender, usually cut In two or
at the most four pieces, with one gore
overlapping another In an odd way
and making the skirt Individual and
pretty. While most models are high
waists, some very new ekirts are high
only across the back, with a belt from
the side seams across the front, a
moBt admirable arrangement and one
sure to prove successful, for it insures
a perfect fit In the front, where
skirts sometimes stretch, while tho
extension at the back prevents any
possible missing of connections, a
catastrophe in the opinion of the
neat.
heavy added piece in the form of a
bang extending to the eybrows.
Notes.
Lace Is much used as ruffles on
skirts of evening frocks.
Many of the newest evening coats
are made with a single seam.
The new horn buttons trimmed In
contrasting color come in a variety of
combinations.
Machine stitching Is popular on
skirts and coat suits of cbevk knd
English Bultlngs. v.r. k
Charmeuse continues to be He fash
ionable fabric for afternoon wear. The
favorite trimming is silk fringe.
Paris has elected the huge flat, Blm
ply trimmed bat of black velvet as the
reigning favorite of the season.
Youthful Juror Summoned.
The most youthful Juror ever sum
moned in an Irish court is a little six-year-old
lad who, the other morning
attended ths recorder's court In Bel
fast, with his mother, for the purpose
of answering hie name, and asking to
be excused from serving in such an
onerous capacity.

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