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The Greeneville daily sun. (Greeneville, Tenn.) 1918-1920, October 09, 1919, Image 2

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THE GREENE VILLE DAILY SUN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER , 1919.
The Greeneville Daily Sun
PUBLISHED DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY.
W. R. LYON, Editor and ProprUtor.
Subscriotion Ratest
Daily Subscription By Carrier, 15c a week, 50c a month.
By Mail Outside of Greeneville 40c a month; 75c for
8 months; $1.50 for 6 months; $3.00 for the year.
Entered at the postofflce at Greeneville, Tenn., as second
class matter.
It is not certain that the rabbit would have any better
time if it were brave.
If a young man works his way through college one
thing is certain he wants to go.
When a long-hoped-for change in the weather does
come, the change is often overdue.
"Visiter" is the English way of spelling "visitor,'
though one might expect "visitour."
The rohibition party says it is not dead, uust pre
paring to move to England, perhaps.
The more liberty there is, the more careful one must
be not to obtrude o nthe liberty of others.
Soldier garb should teach us a lesson in comfort,
Wintry winds don't annoy a man in puttees.
cigjia ci umi, me fsuusuiuie ior tne saloon is
going to be the much respected game of dominoes.
rnnmADa tkinl. i I !1 1 1 1 I . .
"""s15" miiiivD me juiKUHcis ougni to go duck to their
owners, but just like Congress, neglects to let go.
own time." It required centuries to convince the majority
that the earth isn't flat and some are still skeptical.
Young folks like caoh other's company best, but they
value most the laughter of the older folks at their wit.
Arranging the hours to suit the rising and setting
of the sun as daylight saving has done is the real "God'i
mo ..j .,,,, nuuiu uruer notning out cake and pie at
luncheon if he were not afraid of being regarded as
juvenile.
Carranza never has been vividly grateful to the United
States for forcing the elimination of Huerta which made
way for him.
With all the bonedry in Ohio, we suspect there is still
a moitt uurrow in Cincinnati. A bonedry Cincy is in
conceival )e. i.
Self-determination of peoples is going to manifest itself
in this country by the cities sticking to daylight saving,
dewey grass or not.
Explanation of our naval interference in the fight in
Dalmatia explains that we interferred; and it is sup
posed the incident is closed.
The Russians are calling upon the allies for a declara
tion of policy toward Russia; but since Bullitt left the
powers are unable to make up their minds.
OUT OF THE FOG.
A survey of world conditions as the northern hemis
pheres plunge toward winter is sufficient to convince the
average man that humanity must hasten to regain its
senses and resume its labors quickly if uppalling catas
trophes are to b averted. There is a world shortage of
food and a world shortage of fuel. The nations that have
given most to the cause of humanity are the worst pros
pective sufferers. France, England, and Italy are in dire
straits already, and the pinch of winter is not yet here.
England no longer produces coal eonugh for her own
needs. France is not obtaining from Germany the coal
that is necessary to save life. Italy has no coal and no
means of obtaining coal.
Germany and Austria are in equally bad shape, so far
as food and fuel are concerned. They are in still worse
condition from a credit viewpoint, as no nation will lend
them money and their securities are scraps of paper, such
as Turkish, Bulgarian and Hungarian bonds. There is
no Turkey, Bulgaria is a liability and Hungary is feeling
the just retribution of the Roumanians, who had been
stripped and starved by the rapacious Magyars and Ger
mans. Everything that can sustain life has been extorted
fro mthe Magyars by the famished and desperate Rou
manians, and it is to the credit of France and Italy that
they have refused to look upon this reprisal as unjust.
Some idealists in the supreme council have afTected to
look with horror upon Roumania recouping her food sup
ply in Hungary, but they have nothing to say of the piti
less devastation wrought by Falkenhuyn and Mackensen
with their German-Magyar hordes throughout Roumanfa.
If there is no other justice to be had in this world it is
well that retribution should be had with the sword against
those who draw the sword.
The world is going through a twilight zone of fog and
error, in which strange idealistic notions are accepted by
deluded millions in mistake for truth. In its shell shock
and present economic distress the world accepts nonsense
for reason and is willing to abandon ti.sted truth in order
to follow glittering experimental schemes which seem to
open a good road out of the universal morass.
It is fondly supposed that nations tan somehow join
together to accomplish sudden wonders of force and re
form without in the least compromising national integrity.
The fact that the same nations have joined in mutual
efforts for eleven months with absolute freedom of action
and have failed to ascertain what ails the world does not
seem to have any weight with the rainbow chasers. There
is onw in actual sitting a supreme council of nations, and
yet, instend of smiting down the plans of the world's
enemies and lifting up the stricken among nations, the
supreme council is fast becoming an impotent debating
society, because it also is deluded and is following phan
toms. It is cowardly when it sees the truth and absurdly
arrogant when pursuing wrong. It dares not tackle
Russia, but it breathes slaughter against Roumania. It
is persistent in the delusion that political nostrums can
cure economic ills, and thus appears in the role of a
quack who administers medicine without the least idea
of cause or effect.
Are the peoples to be blamed for error vhen their gov
ernments blunder? It is not surprising that wage earners
are infected with poisonous doctrines, such as the belief
that restriction of output will increase wages or the notion
that a political revolution in the United States will mean
an economic millennium. Why do they mix politics with
economics? Because their leaders have taught them to
do so. If governments themselves are muddled, it is too
much to expect hard-working men, busy earning a living,
to avoid all pitfalls.
Since the world is short of food, it must produce more
or die. Since it is short of coal, it must produce more or
freeze to death. Since it has an enemy who is arming
for another attack, it must shackle him or have another
war. Since it has issued a lot of aper am: called it dol-
lot'. nr.IIVI.ln f... I' 1 .l I . ...
""n '"uuu.-, ji(ui, Hiiu ivN, ine r.nu runics, it must either
put value into this paper or use it by the- bushel to buy
a dozen eggs. Since it is formed by nature to live by
nationalities with distinct love and hates, ic must either
strive to live at pence by nationalities or violate nature
by trying to become one people. Since man cannot add
to his stature by wishing or increase the wheat crop by
voting' or double the coal output by creating a League
of Nations, it behovoes him to recover his senses as
quickly as possible and go to work. There is no sub
stitute for labor. Washington Post.
The Town Gossip
4 4 ! ! 4 4 4 4
At the precise period when, it is cool enough to make
picnics enjoyable .the ground is too cold and damp for
one to sit around the picnic dinner.
THE TREATY DEBATE.
It is unfortunate that all discussions of the peace treaty
and the League of Nations are not conducted with good
temper and avoidance of offensively personal remarks.
There is ample room, in this subject for the exercise of
all the wisdom that any American can muster, and he
cannot muster all of his wisdom if he strays from th
problems themselves. Any kind of argument that runs
into an exchange of epithets or disputes as to veracity is
a subtraction from the sum total of wisdom that could
be applied to the subject. For the time toeing, a man
encased in mprn nuarpolmn a. i .
" j--""5 uin me ireuiy or me league
is defrauding himself of the opportunity' to think of
something really worth while.
The questions involved in the peace treaty are of su
preme importance to the United States, and therefore to
every citizen of the United Suites. The amount of solid
information and enlightenment concerning the treaty is
not yet sufficient for the eople. They are not yet fully
acquainted with the responsibilities and consequences of
membership in the League of Nations. The best that any
individual senator can do is to study some particular
branch of the subject, muster it and give the results of
his study to the country, honestly and patriotically. Some
senators have done this faithfully. Others have been
unable to devote the required time to the task. Still
others have wasted their time in fruitless controversy
over immaterial points arising from the discussions. All
told, only a few valuable contributions to the stock of
public information have been made, and thus, at a time
when the country should be thoroughly posted upon the
subject and ready for a decision, there is wide diversity
of opinion upon questions that can be solved by con
scientious research and mental application.
The time is approaching when the Senate must decide,
ignorantly or prudently, what shall be done. Inasmuch
as the treaty covers a multitude of questions that have
not even been discussed by the senate, it seems reason
able to suggest that personal exchanges be eliminated
v,
' iiuinriinor questions be subordinated holes "will come in th.' wrong r'ace." Showing the su-
anu a united eirort made to analyze the major propositions periority of woman's judgment in refusing buttons .-nd
in an their possible bearings upon the future of the
United States.
If the national government is to he required to build
public roads in backward states, it may better be asked
to build public schools there. That's more important.
King Albeit proposes to experience all the ups and
downs of American life. After shooting up 54 stories in
a New York sky-scraper he has gone to Boston to eat a
pot of beans.
Even 'Jy novelists as well as t'.ie movies rush to
cowboy land for locM color. W. mot of us know only
th hind of people who dwell in the small town or t'.ie
big one. Write about ;hem. It seems more real.
There's one hypothesis to explain the increase of pneu
monia among men. Since t:.- scornful abolition of the
ard-boiled rliirt the negligee is too tl.in u covering for
the pulmonary tract. Bring back the coat of armor.
Men can't have their suits turned because the button-
i
clinging to hooks and eye:
turned.
Fcmini ic sui s can be
SOME FRIENDS.
VERY KINDLY.
INVITED ME.
TO GO to Newport yesterday.
IN THEIR automobile.
AND WE left here.
ABOUT SIX o'clock.
AND ONLY got lost once.
AND WE had a good time.
AND AT about eleven.
WE DECIDED.
THAT IT was time.
FOR US to start.
BACK HOME again.
AND WE did.
AND WE rode along.
FOR ABOUT an hour.
OR MORE.
AND SOMEBODY.
ON THE back seat.
SAID THAT we were.
ON THE wrong road.
AND I thought so too.
AND WHEN we came.
TO A house.
I GOT out.
AND HOLLOWED.
AND A man.
WITH A striped shirt.
CAME TO the door.
AND I asked him.
WHETHER THAT was the road.
TO GREENEVILLE.
e
AND HE said.
IT WAS not.
AND I asked him.
WHERE WE were.
AND HE said.
"NOT FAR from Morristown."
AND I asked him.
1
HOW WE could get.
ON THE road.
TO GREENEVILLE.
AND HE said:
"TAKE THE first.
"ROAD TO the left.
"AND TURN to your right.
"AND CROSS a bridge.
"AND TURN to your left
"AND PASS a church.
"AND TURN to' your right.
"AND THEN to your left."
AND I thanked him.
see
AND GOT back.
INTO THE car again.
AND WE started off.
AND WE drove along.
FOR ABOUT an hour.
OR MORE.
AND SOMEBODY.
ON THE back seat.
SAID THAT they thought.
WE WERE on the wong road.
e e .
ONCE MORE.
AND I thought so too.-
AND WHEN we came.
TO ANOTHER farm house.
Uu RipplingRhqmos1
DoAiW Walt JWW.fc
October.
It makes me feel sober to know
that October is just about due at the
door; her curves all remind me of
long years behind me, and short ones
that stack up before. October is
ghostly, she's saddening, mostly, with
leaves falling down from the trees,
with nights that are chilly and rains
that ace silly, and farewells to robins
and bees. Oh, dreary October, in
sadness they robe her, her garments
are ashen and brown; the year's grow
ing wider and feebler and colder,
which reminds me my sun's going
down. October's the token of joys
that are broken ; the roses are wither
ed and gone; nasturtiums and asters
have met with disasters, they flourish
no more on the lawn.. It rains, but
the water would have to be hotter
before it could nourish the heath ; it's
raw and it's chilling and clammy and
killing and brings me a message of
death. The cool winds are sighing,
the wild geese or flying, and honking
like automobiles; their wide wings are
humming, they herald the coming of
weather that promptly congeals. The
summer's departed and Autumn's
well started, and winter will come
with a rush, the winter so yellow
then happy the fellow who's saved up
a package of cush.
kt.
'usfc fbl
by Eddaf A. Guest
9 - 1 .t
ALL THAT LIFE CAN GIVE
When the gentle mother's singing,
and the children are at play,
And the home seems filled with laugh
ter atthe ending of the day,
I can settle down contented and dis
cover there and then
That I'm owning all the gladness that
life has to give to men.
When the little ones are healthy and
the mother wears a smile,
I don't need to sigh for riches for
I've everything worth while;
When the nights are calm and peace
ful and the daily tasks are o'er,
I find that I'm possessing all that men
are striving for.
When I'm free from all distraction
and my thoughts are running
clear,
When the sound of happy children is
the music that I hear,
Through the sham of earthly glory
and its golden lure I see,
Though I've neither fame nor fortune
all their joys belong to me.
He that finds his loved ones happy
when his daily tasks are through,
And has grought them to content
ment, has done all that man can
do. .
For the purpose of all struggle when
the cjash and clamor cease,
Be the toiler great or humble, is a
home that's rich with peace.
TIRED TRYING TO FARM
80 acres of good land for sale, SV
miles southeast of Cleveland, Tenn.,
on R. F. D. One-half mile to good
school, two teachers. One half mile
to one church and one mile to another
church. One mile to two country
stores; good pike road.
I have about 50 acres in good state
of cultivation, balance in good young
growth timber. Extra good pasture;
well watered with stock pond. Land
is all fresh cleared, about all of it
in the past seven years.
Land is gravely nature with clay
subsoil. A portion of land lays roll
ing. This land will grow anything
that this country will grow.
Good four-room house finished,
with three room tenant house, barn,
crib, tool house, sheds etc. J
This farm also has a good young
orchard of about 100 trees.
Anyone desiring such a place
should write for further particulars
and details and see the growing crops.
JOHN C. BROWNING,
R. F. D. 4, Cleveland, Tenn.
166-4t.
NOWUiMOOK
a mm. n m t
Li car
ape
If city bcautification doesn't pro
gress as fast as you'd like, dress up
and help out its appearance that much
I GOT out again.
AND HOLLERED.
AND HOLLERED.
AND FINALLY a man.
CAME OUT.
AND I asked him.
WHERE WE were.
AND HE said.
"THREE MILES from Newport."
AND I was so mad.
I LIKEDA cried.
AND I asked him.
TO SET us straight.
AND HE did so.
AND I wrote it down.
AND WE started out again.
AND AFTER about two hours.
SURE ENOUGH.
WE HIT Greeneville.
AND I never was gladder.
TO SEE a town.
IN MY life.
AND THEN.
.
WE GOT home.
ALRIGHT.
1
I THANK you. .
Swimming.
Nuthing is so usefill to peeple in
deep wattir as knowing how to swim.
If a person is drowdning, no matter
how many other things they know, un
less they know how to swim they will
keep on drownding. Meny of the
smartest peeple have been saved frum
drownding by ignorant peeple jest be
cause they didn't know how to swim
and the ignorant peeple did.
Keeping up in the wattir all de
pends on wat motions you make,
Sometimes drownding peeple make
more motions than any other kind,
ony they aint the rite kind of mo
tions, meny of them meerly being mo
tions for help. A persin that don't
know how to swim is jest as anxiour
to stay on top of the wattir as eny
body elts, but that dont say he will.
This proves that nollege is more pow
erfill than hope.
a good swimmer wouident care
how awffen he fell in the wattir if
it wasent for his clothes.
Most peepl? dont mind trying to
swim in shallo wattir because it
a grate comiort to Know you can
go down ferther than your neck
you go down. Meny peeple who seem
jto be swimming in shallo wattir reely
have one foot on the bottom. This
proves that appearance is deceetfill
, Altho a persin can dive without
knowing how to swim, they awtent to
for their own safety.
A diver who goes in jest rite with
out hardly making a hole gets the
most enjoyment out of it, but one
that goes in flop on his stummick with
a big splash gives others the most en-joyment.
4 Good reasons for knowing how
to swim is ferst, so you can save youi
own life, 2nd, so you can save other
peeples life, 3rd, so you can wawk
on the edge of a river and dont care
wat happens, and 4th, so you can say
yes in case enybody asks you.
t PROFESSIONAL :
DR. W. T. MATHES
Physician
Office Bohannon Bldg.
Hours 8 to 9 a. m.; 12:30 to' 3
p. ni.; 7 to 9 p. m. (
Both Phones at Office
Residence, New Phone 227.
2-140-6mo.
DR. H. M. TAYLOR
nd
Dr. L. E. DYER
Physicians and Surgeons
Offices Bohannon Building, Main
Street
Office Hours 8 to 9 a. m.; 12:30
to 3 p. m.; 7 to 9 p. m.
Night calls. Both phones.
DR. E. C. DONNALD
PHYSICIAN
Office Over Square Drug Store.
Office Hoursi 8 o 10 A, M.,
lto 4 P. M., and 7 to 8 P. M.
Leave day calls at Square Drug
Store. '
Night calls J. S. Bernard's res
idence or call Frank Gass' rest-dence.
1 5
W. T. MITCHELL
Justice of The Peace
Office, Basement Mason House,
Greeneville, Tenn.
O. T. FRENCH
Justice of The Peace
and
Notary Public
Matrimony a Specialty.
Office over Hardin Grocery Co.
Opposite Court House.
O. I. LANE
Constable and Collector
Greeneville, Tenn.
I do a general collecting business
and pay all accounts through the
Citiiens Savings Bank. I earnest
ly solicit a share of your business.
Reference: Any burness firm
in Greeneville
i i
NEWTON C. MYERS & SONS
Meadow Valley Farm, Greene
Wile, Tenn.
Breeders of
Polled Short Horn Cattle..
U. S. Government and SUate Tu
berculin accredited herd. "Dia
mond Archer," X18366, S. H.
780646, a rich bred roan Scotch
bull at head of herd. The ma
trons represent some of the lead
ing families of this great breed.
See our exhibit at the Greene
County Fair.
Our Cheap Column
Little Advertisment in this Column
Will Bring Quick Results One
Cent Word.
Many men may think they would
like to boss the business except when
it comes to seeing that thei-e is money
enoungh to fill out the pay roll.
WANTED: Used cars of all mak
es. City Car Exchange. 165 t. f,
FOR SALE: I Buick Six; 2 Buick
fours; 1 Dodge Tourir.g and 1 90
Overland. City Car Exchange.
165-2t.
BOARDERS WANTED: I have
opened a boarding house at 115
Depot street, where good board and
lodging can be had at a reasonable
price. W. D. COPP, 163-6t.
LOST: Bunch of keys on silver
chain. Finder return to Sn office
and receive liberal reward. 126.-tl
CASH FOR OLD FALSE TEETH:
(Broken or not) We pay $2.00 to
$35.00 per set. Also actual value
for Diamonds, Watches, Bridge
work, Crowns, Old Gold, Silver
and Platinum. Send at once and
receive cash by return mail. Your
goods returned if price is unsatis
factory Mazer Bros., Dept. E.
2007 S. Fifth street, Philadelphia,
Pa- 2-148 t. f.
FOR SALE: Dne 5-passenger Lodge
car, with bedan top, and in good
condition. Good tires. HERMON
CUTSHAWL, Greeneville, Tenn.
162-6t.
FOR SALE: Five nassencer Fnrrl
car in good condition. C. M. Bran
nan. 157-t. f
RAILROAD
Schedule time of passenger tksins
leaving Greeneville, Tenn
The following schedule figures pub-
usnea as lniormation and not
guaranteed.
SOUTHERN RAILROAD
Westbound. Easthound.
4:25 a.m...Mem.-Wash...l :35 a.m
7:05 a.m. .Knox.-Bristol. 8:05 n.m
11:30 a.m..N. Y.-N. 0...4:58 p.m.
5:04 p.m...N. Y.-Mem...9:55 a.m
0:12 p.m. .Knox-Bristol. 7:37 a.m.
UNITED STATES
RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION

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