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Sturgis advertiser. (Sturgis, Dakota [S.D.]) 1887-1???, June 25, 1891, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn97065761/1891-06-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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CAPITAL
$50,000.
OfriOEBS.
£1.
Bailey, Pres.
A. McPherson, V.P.
J.J. Davenport,
Cashier.
M.
1. Perkins,
ABB't OaBhler.
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First National Bank
OF STURGIS, SOUTH DAKOTA,
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Interest IPetlcl oxi Tflrxi© Deposits.
FXTL3L. STOCK WALL PBPER.
H.O. ANDERSON,
HARDWARE, STOVES
And everything usually found in a first-class hardware stofc.
Building- Material -of -Every -Description
A.OE2STT FOR, BAJ2ST "W-A.003STS.
have a Ml line of Farm Machinery for the Spring Trade,
THE
COMMERCIAL
^euin-st., Stiargis.
EXCELLENT CUISINES
^BEST BEDS IN TOWN
V..
Free Bus to and from All Trains.
SAMPLE ROOM FOR TRAVELING MEN.
Give us a Call. J. M'Clain, Prop.
Sehiffer stein'S
Main-st between Drug Stores.
BOARD BY THE DAY, WEEK OR MONTH.
Main Street Sturgis, S. D.
CHARLES H. MUELLER.
BPOMMM to Mueller & Haonati.
Druggist and Optician.
DRUGS, STATIONERY, and FIELD GLASSES.
Prescriptions a Specialty, Open at all Hotirs.
MEATS
BEST IN THE MARKET I
FRESH AND SALTED MEATS
QP JkXJLf KTND8.
jFish, Poultry and Game a Specialty.
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SURPLUS
$4,500.
DIRECTORS.
D. A. McPlierson,
H. E. Bailey.
Charles Francis,
R. C. Lake,
D. H. Clark,
3. *. Potter,
f, J. Davenport.
WANT
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SEASON
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STURGIS ADVERTISER.
The ADVERTISER is entered at the Sturgis post
office as second-class matter.,
HAJ. MCKINLEY'S NOMINATION.
The nominatian of Wm. McKinley, jr.,
by the republicans for the governorship
of his state is an event of more than po
litical significance and importance, says
the Sioux City Journal. Hie republi
cans of Ohio have made Ma?. McKin
ley's case their own, and they have done
this with such unanimity and enthusiasm
as to disarm criticism as to the represen
tative character of their work'.
Maj. McKinley was made the special
object of attaok by the democrats last
year, with a view to promoting the in
terests of the national democratic party.
His congressional distriot Was gerryman
dered to that extent by the democratic
legislature that it was thought he could
not possibly be retnrned to congress.
Prior to last year Maj. McKinley's
district known aB the eighteenth, consist
ed of the counties of Carroll, Columbi
ana, Mahoning and Stark, and his plur
ality over his democratic competitor in
1888 was 4,099. In redisricting the
state he was put into the sixteenth, con
sisting of the counties of Medina, Wayne
Holmes and Stark. These counties in
the presidential election gave Cleveland
over Blaine 1,756, and the democrats
counted that in the congressional elect
ion they would be good for 3,000 dem
ocratic majority. Maj. MoKinley, how
ever* took up the fight, and his demo
cratic opponent only had a plurality of
812, in a total vote of 40,672. The pro
hibitionists subtracted for their candi
date 846 votes, showing that Maj. Mo
Kinley could have carried the district
against the democratic candidate alone.
The purpose of the stubborn fight
against Maj. McKinley in Ohio last fall
was to establish the unpopularity of the
tariff measure bearing his name. J. G.
Warwick, the candidate against him,
was selected on account of his wealth,
and all the resources at the command of
the democratic organization, etate and
national, were at his disposal in the cam
paign. Instead of establishing the un
popularity of Maj. McKinley's work
chairman of the ways and means com
mittee in the last congress the contrary
was done.
This latter fact, however, has not been
oonceded by the democrats of Ohio or
by the democratic party of the country,
and therefore it is particularly interest
ing to find the issue joined again this
year, and the larger field of the whole
state given to its trial.
The Columbus convention has furn
ished proof of the enthusiasm with which
the battle is entered upon by the repub
lican party of the state. The republi
cans of the state are united, -and con
scious of the fact that they are to make
the initiatory contest in the great cam
paign of 1892.
The democrats the country over have
sought to attach opprobrium to Maj.
McKinley's name in their desire to make
offensive the republican tariff legislation
of the last congress. The people of
Ohio this fall are to indorse this work or
give it fitting rebuke.
Republican confidence is general
the triumphant election of Maj. McKin
ley to the governorship of his state
The abusiveness Of the democratic
party has added not a little to this con
fidence, for fair play is a true American
characteristic, and the justice of fair play
is honored by the Buckeye state in every
fair fight.
COINAGE A8 A PRIVATE SNAP.
A silver dollar containing a dollar's
worth of silver is a legitimate and honest
coin. A pseuds silver dollar containing
78 cents worth of silver is 22 per cent
fraud. The free coinage of the first robs
no one and is' a private snap for no one
But free coinage of a debased 78-cent
coin for which the owner receives $1
robs the public that takes it and is a 22
per cent bounty to the Bilver dealer.
The government now coins debased
silver dollars. But the 22 per cent profit
under the present law, goes to the gov
ernment itself and is no private snap for
silver sharks. The issue between silver
Coinage by the present method and by
ihe free coinage plan, is simply, whether
Jthe publio treasury, or private pockets,
fere to get the 22 per oent profit. By
Jthe present method the government pays
the market price for silver bullion, coins
the silver into light-weight dollars and
lays aside the proceeds in the public
.vault. Under free coinage, the govern
ment would coin the bullion into 78-cent
dollars and pay the sliver miner or silver
speculator $1, or a bounty of 22 cents
for each coin. It is simply a question
of whether the people of this oouatry
through their treasury department, will
jay silver miners and dealers 78 cents
I6r $1, for 78 cents worth of silver bull
ion.
Some idle correspondent has circula
ted a rumor that Secretary Blaine would
favor free coinage if limited tb American
silver that is that he would favor giv
ing the the 22 per cent bounty to Amer
ican silver miners btft hot to foreigners,
But Mr. Blaine in thirty years of publio
career has never intimated anything
*4
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VOLUME V.---NUMBER 25. STURQIS—BLACK HILLS—SOUTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, JUNE 25,1891.
the kind. He opposed even the light
weight dollar. His last public utterance
was in 1878, when he favored silver coin
age providing the silver dollar should
contain a dollar's worth of silver. A de
based coiD he has never favored, and he
not liable to now in /f&e interests of
private pockets.
The picture of the United States mint
being turned over to miner and silver
sharks, with a government franchise to
turn out debased dollars by 'unlimited
wholesale and compel the people to pay
$1 in gold for every 78-cent piece of sil
ver—is something which the World
should never have the pleasure of wit
nessing. Coinage is a public funotion
which should never be debased into a
private snap.—Minneapolis Tribune.
PLENTY HORSES.
A Woonsocket correspondent of the
Sioux Falls Press recently gave that
paper a bit of news which if true* is quite
interesting. It is as follows':
"A strange story is brought out by
the acquittal of Plenty Horses for the
murder of Lieut. Casey. It will be re
membered that early last year when the
first uneasiness was manifested among
the redskins that two young men were
murdered by them at the agency. Miss
Ida Cox of Woonsocket, who for two
years past has been teaohing at Rosebud,
tells your correspondent the following
story in a letter:
'I have been watching with interest
the proceedings in the trial of Plenty
Horses and while I do not itjoioe at the
failure to acquit Plenty Horses, I oannot
help but feel that it was a judgment sent
upon Lieut Casey. I knew the lieuten
ant. Last year when two of our neigh
bor boys were killed near the agency,
Lieut. Casey took sides with the Indi
ans, though both young men were mur
dered in cold blood, arid kept the wit
nesses nearly a week instructing them,
and urging them not to talk, not to give
any evidence, to tell conflicting stories,
eto., etc. On trial, all the Indians were
were acquitted and soon Casey was
murdered in cold blood and now his
slayer is free. It appears to me like it
is what some people would -call retribu
tive justice, though I don't like to oall it
justice when a cold-blooded murderer
like Plenty Horses goes free.'
BAD CAPITAL TO START WITH.
Moral cowardioe is a mighty poor cap
ital to start out to buy the world with,
but some people try te de it sometimes.
For instance, a political party has just
been launched into existence, and almost
its first word was a flat refusal to go on
record as the opponent of the saloon
Satan laughs to see such reformers as
that.—Western Farmer and Stockman
A Statement.
The Star will state in behalf of its
editor that the report going the rounds
of the Black Hills papers that a man in
Spearfish was suspected of having some
thing to do with the Hay Creek mystery
originated in the diseased brain of the
editor of the Whitewood Plaindealer.
Star.
Say, Mr. Star editor, yoti know you
lied when writing the above. The Plain
dealer never originated anything of the
kind. The first information we had on
the subject was derived from reading the
Star, and in conversation with the editor.
Plaindealer.
From Viewfleld.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
Mr Felton, who was recently Shot and
badly wounded by Elmer Olipbant, is
somewhat better. Mr. Felton is an old
solider, having served through the war
of the rebellion and was honorably dis
charged. Oliphant, father to Mr. Fel
ton's would-be assassin, has sent letters
to various papers iu the Black Bills in
tending to mislead the public in regard
to the character of Mr. Felton. Suoh
base ttiiu fm»t Muoutfaiious is little to be
wondered at coming from suoh a source.
The Oliphant family are to well known
to command much respect from apyone.
The settlers in their vicinity have all
more or less suffered loss at the hands of
the boy Elmer in his thievish raids and
they would be glad should he be put
where he will be taken care of. Oli
phant mentioned in his letters that Mr.
Felton did not have any neighbors ex
cept his son-in-law. It is quite the con
trary the neighbors have shown great
sympathy for Mr. Felton and family and
have extended much help to -them for
which they wish to convey their thanks.
wood Times.
v
AIIFJRED TUBTON.
Times wishes to suggest that in
the mind of Governor Mellette the Blaok
Hills "are not in it" when official ap
pointments are to be made. The entire
railroad commission of the state is taken
from the eastern section, and yet the
Hills are not without extensive and im
portant railroad lines. The Hills have
been recognized, however, by the gov
ernor in his appointing power to the ex
tent of the appointment of about two
score militia colonels, and the collection
from each of two dollars per commission.
When political requests for preferment
go around next year, there will foe op
portunity to exchange mutual recogni
tions of ability and deserving*.—Bead
1
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JULY 4TH, 1891,
4t storms.
A Grand Time aSStired to
all Who Attend.
The Occasion will Sur
pass all Former Dem»
lustrations.
Brilliant Display of Fire
works.
Handsome Purses for the
Several Races.
Eighth Cavalry Band
The best in the
State.
Horse Races, Hose Race
Foot Races, Etc.*
Besides the Many Other
Attractions to Make
the Celebration a
Success.
Everybody Invited to
Take Part in the Pa
triotic Festivi
ties.
4
ft,
M.:
Earthquake.
FORENOON.
90 yard foot race b6ys under
10, purse $5.
9:40: 100-yard foot race, boys under
16* purse $5.
9:50: Potato race, $4.
10: The pig, $5.
10:20: Wheel-barrow race, boys, $6.
10:30: Hose race, $25.
11: 100-yard foot race, $15.
Do You Take It?
We mean, do you take the 'Paul
Daily, Sunday or Weekly Globe? If
you do not, you are the man who got
left. If you want the news, all the news
and the latest and most reliable market
reports—not to mention a vast amount
of rare miscellaneous reading for ladies
and young folk, then subscribe for the
St Paul Globe. Every new subscriber
gets one of Houghten's New Reversible
Political Maps and Rand, McNally &
Co.'s splendid map of the United States,
the most valuable double map ever pub
lished. Ji is worth five dollars.
Are You Alive
To the importance of keeping up with
the times? If so, subscribe, for that
newsiest and best of metropolitan week
lies, the Sioux City Journal. In order
to give this paper the widest possible
circulation the publishers have made the
following uuprecedentedly low prices,
from this date, for the campaign: Single
copies to November 16, 1891, 25 cents.
Clubs of five or more to Nov. 16, 1891,
2Qc fwoh. Sample copies free. Ad
dress,. vP&RKIISS iSuoe. Co.,
V V V' 'R
I.-
CHAS. C.POLK,
AFTERNOON.
heat, half mile trot $20.
2:15: Quarter mile pony race $20
2:30: Second heat, half mile trot.
2:45: First heab one mile trot, $50.
3: Third heat, half mile trot.
3:15: Quarter mile free for all, $20.
3:30: Second heat one mile trot.
3:45: One mile, cavalry horses, $20.
4: Third heat one mile trot.
4:15: 600 yard dash, $20.
4:30: Half mile running raoe, $30.
"The Spy of Shiloh."
The above celebrated drama is in re
hearsal and will be produced in our city,
under the auspioes and for the benefit of
Calvin Duke post, G. A. R. The drama
has a national reputation, being the first
drama ever produced, which represented
scenes and incidents of the late rebellion.
This is the twenty-fifth year since its
first production in Cincinnati in 1865,
since which time it has been played
throughout the principal cities from the
Atlantic to the Pacific. The drama is of
thrilling interest, portraying vividly the
lights and shades of the life led by those
who marched to the music of the Union.
It is interpersed with songs, music and
dancing by contrabands, in addition to
which is added 18 beautiful tableaux
vivants, realistic battle scene, and the
most thrilling soene ever presented on
any stage, Andersonville prison pen,
which goes with irresistable force t6 the
hearts of all. The drama is under the
personal supersion of its author, Maj.
Frank Howard, and our citizens may
look for the most enjoyable time in the
history of Sturgis. Tickets will be on
sale at Max Fishel's, and if you want a
seat our advice is to go at once and se
cure one. It will be presented four
evenings, July 8, 9, 10 and 11. Remem
ber the date and be there. Admission
will be reasonable.
Popular
CtBOBGB V. AYRE8.
Sioux Citjj Ioirfe
'i* As
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k. Q. ALLEN, Amistant (ladder.
'WESTiElRJESr
BAHK AM) TRUST CO.
Oa/pital e3SO,OOQ.
Liability of Stock Holders $165,005. iai^l Ap jj
ferirLOijpal OfELoe, Sturgla.
X3ii»«ftOtOZ*S.
Jacob W. Weeks, W. W. Hannan, Charles K. Latham, E. L. Kelaejr, MiltoA jS. 8. Po&
'tii-iris.
Detroit, Michigan F. M. Allen, John G. Wenke, Ches.L PAHc. ol Stifl
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING* BUSINESS.
BUYS MUNICIPAL AND SCHOOL BONDS.
FARM LO ANS^LOWEST RATES
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS.
Clothing Made
STURGIS, SOUTH DAKOTA..
DAVENPORT & HOSHN,
Loan and Investment Brokers.
Farm Loans at Lowest
Agents I First-Class Fire Ins. Comp&&ies.
Notorial Work and Conveyancing a Sjecialty.
Land Office Business Attended to
S&tisfaction Guaranteed. Sturgis^ So. Dak.
SHERIDAN HOUSE
JOHN SCOI.TIARD Pro£
A Home for Everybody
Free Bus to stil-T^pains.
AYRES & "WARDMAN
HARDWARE
ManirLg S\xppli©3,
DEAD WOOD, SOUTH DAKOTA.
BRANDT'S BAKERY,
—xeepa—
BREAD, CAKES, PISS, ETC
Any Article in His Line Made to Order on short Notice,
MEALS
E. O. KNIGHTi
ss,
ITETS, BLANKETS, 00LLABS, ET0
Main. STREET^
anything in tin tent£ii&ft 1
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$2 PER ANNUM
J. W W«EXB. VtoePrwidaOtl
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to
Order.
B. S. WARDHA*
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