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The Black Hills union. [volume] (Rapid City, Pennington County, Dakota [S.D.]) 1889-1904, May 02, 1890, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn97065832/1890-05-02/ed-1/seq-4/

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BY THE
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BLACK HILLS PUBLISHING CO.
B. B.RKKD, SBCKBTAdY AND MANAOEU.
OBtoa on Haln Street in Sweeny Block.
P.bltehed ever Friday at Rapid City, S. D.
X1 BB.ua—$1.50 per year, in Advance.
FRIDAY, MAY 2. 1890.
It ia jjenerally admitted that under
the prohibition law" no permits can be
granted before June 1st.
It was reported that Mr. Knowles
Would
remove his paper to Piedmont.
It is now talked that the plant will be
located at Stnrgis.
Make out a full list of all assessable
property and have it' ready for the as
sessor. Give in all your property and
see that your neighbors do the same.
The Sturgis Record has been leased by
George Hair. C. Moody will retire
from the newspaper business. While the
Record, as managed by Mr. Moody, has
been father too radical and Moodyish to
suit THE UNION, it has been one of the
best edited exchanges we received, and
Mr. Hair will have to rustle to keep it
up to its standard.
Have you planted a few trees? If not,
it is not yet too late, but will soon be.
Drive,to the nursery and get a few fruit
trees, it will take but little time or
iponey. If you have no faith in appleB
why get small fruits, grapes, raspberries,
currant or strawberries. They would
soon.be in bearing. But if you won't do
this much- for yourself and family, go
and hunt up a Cottonwood, plant some
thing.
The agricultural press throughout
the Hills speak of the moist condition of
the soil and tbe hopefullness of the
farmers. The fact is, that while recent
snow and rains lave done much good
the ground is moist but a few inches from
the surface and is very much drier than
Usual at this season. Many water-holes
on the "divide, usually filled in the spring,
are now empty. There is, however,
plenty of surface moisture to start the
crop and new comers need have little
fear bat that rain will couie in good
time. When it does come, there will be
lots of it.
The saloon men have been very busy
the past week. The early part of it they
did a rushing business. All old-line
customers seemed resolved to fill up in
good shape while they could. Perhaps,
close out, a reduction was made in I
prices which increased the consumption.
Tuesday tbey began to tear up, and the I
street view made one think that house
cleaning was near. Dealers state that
they are going out of the business. A few
will leaye the state, but the majority
will engage in other lines of business.
Very few men can be found reckless
enough to undertake the evasion of the
law after having once heard it plainly
read."
Hon. Cy Cole o! Custer county, in the
Hermosa PUot, says: "II the iavmevH
want to have a genuine granger's iaiv
this fall, they may have the use ot the
fair grounds tree," He suggests that a
meeting of the farmers be held in a month
or so for the purpose ot arranging lor a
JbUM .and. Av]b\Vtvi\on~ TV\o
gestionis a good one. The tarnier, as
Well as the business man in town, should
do his part toward advancing the in
terests of the country. From lack of
means and time he is not able to take a
hand in the various enterprises always
eminating from business centers. But
in an old fashioned fair where work and
an exhibition of the results of work, are
the chief reqiusites to success, he could
do good work for the country. There is
(So denying the fact that a No. 1 agri
cultural and mineralexhibitwould prove
a grand advertising medium.
The proceedings of the board of com
missioners should be published in the
first issue, of the paper designated by
the board, after the adjournment of the
board. Adjournment was reached on
Saturday the 19th, and the first ap
pearance of the.proceedings was in the
Daily Republican of Saturday the 26th.
In the Journal it did not appear until
the following Thursday. We have not
time in this issue for a thorough review
of the proceedings, but in justice to THE
UNION would call the attention of our
readers to one fact. THE UNION'S bill
for publishing the last proceedings was
$14.75, county exhibit $3.50. The
Republican bill for same two items was
$
18.50 and $5.00, making a difference
in favor of THE UNION of §5.35. In the
first proceedings of the board of county
commissioners for the current year it will
be found that County Treasurer Carr
received $200. for extra services.
During the last session of the board
of county commissioners, Treasurer Carr
received $100 for extra, clerk hire. The
total amount charged to the treasurer's
office during the first
Bix
months of the
current year is $1,805.50, which if
..doubled in tbe next six months will
make the treasurer's office an expensive
.jiecgMity. There is no doubt but that
the work in that office has been greater
than usual the present year, neverthe
less we believe that competent men can
bp found who will undertake the service
Kt greatly reduced figures.
WORD or WARNING.
It la agreed on all hands that wp are
to have a warm political contest the
coming fall. There will be a great many
ery important offices to fill and already
'.ithere area great many anxious to sac
themselves for the public good,
thinking farmers, laborers and busi
gjti^ness men are awakening to the fact that
'r the prosperity of the county depends
laigely on iti political action, and to act
wisely in political affairs they must not
be tied to parties or factions. It is nec
essary that there be parties, and parties
wjill always be more or less controlled by
tings, bqt the independence of the people
Will force the leaders .to make good nomi
nktions. In the present unsettled con
dition of affairs, it is not wise for the
people, aa a whole, nor individually, to
^ij|edge themselves to any faction or per
»gg«Qn, but remain free to act as judgment
dictate. While it mav be easy to
abstain from party pledges, it is not so
easy to keep from individual
3%iunan wants -yoU to assist him in
Mcurinyibe nomination for sheriff an
other would be treasurer or auditor, and
1|0O on. Now if you lop off, one by one,
limb* of a tree, you will soon have a
trunk. So, if one by one, the aspi
.to lor tbe different offices Becure your
ptedgB,you will soon ffnd yourself devoid
itgtueaee in an independent action.
BO pledgee and be careful that,
V|rifcbout*ww»iw'''e
miking it, you don't sell your
,yy|iuyit
.. marts'' JI a mas proposes to lopn you
ISs* *W«*,,* 'WflP*** -^°J 0^V«trN**-. -v *5* C* 'Wi'"
^s -*. -t-:b,:v.y ..i.-.nrl^nnil {n^aKBaf nitin imo utov i»Ir*lif tn nnmA and votn n« thfii? bflV nfl
money at reduced interest, or in any way
ould grant you a favor, go cautious.
Maybe he wants to be sheriff, or some
thing else. Even six per'cent a year re
duction in interest is. a low price for
one's independence. Again we say look
out- Let no man get a string on you.
CURRENT COMMENT
DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES.
There is $4,000 left with which to run
the school during the ensuing year. Mr.
Duck gets $3,000, Dr. Bailey $2,000,
Mr. Oonant $2,000, and Dr. Headden
$2,000. Nino into four, no times,
and not much over. Somebody has
got to "absquatulate," and just
what to do is a question that puzzles the
new board, who are making many inquiries
of leading persons as to what should be
done. Of course, the Deadwood people
think the sohool might have been 'ocatcd
right in the-heart of the mineB, at Le .d
City, if you please, where praotioal ex
amples in mining could be had, and where
miners could have attended at night and
had the benefit of its instruction, but the
Pioneer is not disposed to talk about what
"might have been." The school is at
Kapid and is an aocomplised faot. There
let it stay, and also let the old time jeal
ousy between Rapid and Deadwood over
the matter die. The "fool friends and no
fool enemies" of the school, to quote a
recent writer, have well nigh destroyed it.
Upon the part of the latter, this is neither
kind nor wise. The school can and has
wielded much influenoe for the good of the
whole Hills. Unquestionably, through its
agency was shown the proper methods of
concentrating the tin ores of the southern
Hills and the smelting, without load or
copper, of the Bilicious ores of the north
ern Hills. If it had done nothing else5
this alone would have justified its exist
ence. But it did more. It organized and
carried forward a geological survey which
received the higest commendation in both
this country and Europe, where every
university and technical school, without
exception, secured a copy. This drew the
attention of the scientific public to the
sohQol and incidentally to the Hillf
Through the existence of the school forty
thousand acres of land was secured to the
people of South Dakota with which to
establish a fund for the technical educa
tion of our children and children's children
for all time.
It is not pretended that mistakes may
not have been made in the management
of the school. It is human to err. But
let us hope that all mistakes were of the
iiead and not of the heart, and rejoice that
I there is one place at least where a poor
I student may receive an engineer's educa
tion absolutely without cost—the only
place, so far as the writer knows, in the
whole world, for the Dakota school of
mines makes no charge for instruction, or
material used, to anyone, Some things
have been stated about the management
of the sohool of mines that are not true, as
for instance that the board refused to let
certain experiments in pyritic smelting
be made there. During the experiment,
the board permitted the use of apparatus
and chemicals whenever asked for, and the
smelter has at the present lime apparatus
belonging to the school, and if favors in
other directions were not granted, let it go
as having "happened before the war."
This is an era of peace and prosperity.
T!\m. to oloKQ UlR .school jdoes
not seem to the Pioneer to be wise. II
should be kept open, at least the chemical
and assay department. One good man
e.m attend to all. Let the board select
someone, a technical man of established
reputation in whom the public has full
confidence and leave the school in his
charge until the regular term, and place
the price of assays, tests, etc., at mere
nominal rates—say twenty-five cents each
—for scores of miners now prospecting
are too poor to pay $2.00, now charged,
and thus popularize the school by making
it useful to the public.—The Pioneer.
DAKOTA BO ADS.
PiEnne, S. D., April 25th.—It was first
made publio today that a syndicate of
capitalist from the Twin Cities, of whom
Governor Merriam and Hon. James Bixby
stand at the head, accepted a proposition
made by the board of trade of this city to
bnild, equip and operate the Duluta, Pierre
and Black Hills road, now surveyed from
Aberdeen, via Faulkton to Pierre. It is
understood in a roundabout, though reli
able way, that the Northern Pacific road
stands back of the enterprise. Pierre's
board of trade has been negotiating quiet
ly with these capitalists for some time with
these results. Sam Bixby with several
members of the board of trade started to
drive over the line of road today to Aber
deen. Work will commence onthe grad
ing in the course of a few weeks and it
will be completed as soon as money and
energy can do it.
Miles F, Wolsey, who has the contract
for running the range and meridian lines
across the newly ceded lands of ihe Sioux
reservation from the government, started
from this city today with a large force to
begin the work. Four head officers of the
Northwestern road came in late list night
on a special train. They were Sauborn,
Hollenbeck, Tilton and Wheeler. Today
they visited "Fort Pierre and ascertained
the boundaries of the mile square now oc
onpied by that young city, to which the
railroad company iays claim. It leaks
out that their bnsiness is preparatory to
taking steps to bound the settlers one mile
square and taking possession at once under
their anthorityfrom the government for
railroad purposes, etc. This aotion of the
company has long been looked for and
Fort Pierre people, headed by Fred Petti
grew, a brother of United States Senator
Pettigrew, claim they will oontest with
the Northwestern, even to taking it before
oongress. It is going to be a hot fight
with a fair city matched against a powerful
railroad corporation.—World-Herald.
WOBBS Of MAYOB HABT.
Mayor Hart, of Boston, Maesachus
Eette, at a recent gieeting in that city in
Bpeaking of woman's suffrage said:
"In my judgement, allowing women to
vote for school committe has had as much
to do with the change of politics in the
city of Boston as any other one thing.
[Applause.] Two jears ago, when the
women registered 20,000 votes, we fonnd
ont whether they would vote or not—19,.
000 came out and voted, a thing "never be
fore known and it changed, in my jndg.
ment, the election of two years ago in the
"City of Boston. The very fact that the
women took a hand in it spurred up tbe
men (o realize the
sitnation and what might
be accomplished if the right thing was
done.
I have often asked, 'Why should women
vote?' The only reason -and the only
answer I have ever given to that is, Why
shouldn't they vote? I have never heard
that answered. They are as intelligent as
we are. We ask them to bring op our
children, and we praise them in every waf
we can for bringing them up in the right
way, and why shouldn't they have the same
WASHINGTON,
1
W\
*'T
right to come and vote as their boy hAs
when he arrives at twenty-one years of
Age
I think they have and I think if the repub
lican party adopts that as one of the prin
ciples of the party we are on the right
road, and I wish, so far as I am able, to do
all in my power to bring abont municipal
suffrage for women. Applause. ]—Boston
Herald. p|||
'^^afpointments
We are much, pleased to announce the
appointment by Governor Mellette of
three conscientious and able women upon
the board of charities and correction.
Miss Philena Everett Johnson, of High
more Mrs. Caroline S. Oummings, of
Huron, and Mrs. S. E. Young, of Sioux
Falls. Being personally acquainted with
the two first named ladies, we can vouch
for their earnestness and ability and know
that they would honor any position within
the gift of the governor.—Dakota Kuraliat.
April 18th. —Special to the
Daily Press. If the bill which was favor
ably reported today by the house com'nit
tee on postoflicea and postroads should be
come a law every town of 5,000 inhabitants
would be entitled to a public building or
the money required for the purpose. It
has been shown by members opposed to the
$10,000,000 appropriation for three line
battle ships, that this sum would buy all
the postoilices provided for in the bill,
which has been favorably reported. Quite
a umber of the new western men voted
for the $10,000,000 bill and explain their
votes by saying that Heed is speaker,
Boutelle is chairman of the naval commit
tee, Miliken is chairman of the public
buildings and grounds committee. All of
these men are from Maine, and the only
way they can stand in on their building
bill is to work with the men from Maine.
We want this "you tickle me and I'll
tickle you" business stopped square off,
There is more money in the treasury than
is needed, and the first thing is to stop
putting it there. The common people in
the end pay all this money. Better re
duce the surplus by reducing the tariff
rather than by increasing the expendi
ture. The farmers have no use at present
for new line of battle ships or $50,000
buildings in every town. They want
warehouses for the coming crop, and
fair chance to borrow money on gilt edge
seenrity as low as any man on the earth
and by all the powers they are going to
have it. ''The new western men" better
get a moye on themselves. Ingalls is
down on his marrow bones, and now is the
passing opportunity for some other gen
tlemen. Not a dollar for anything on
earth until there is help for the farmer in
a practical way. If the new western men
cannot find a way, the people will send
newer men who can.—Dakota Ruralist.
It takes 480 loads of corn to pay the
salaries of the -jounty treasurers and regis
teis of deeds, which if strung out in loads
of twenty-five bushels each, giving, to each
load three rods, it would require a caval
cade four and one-half miles in extent to
pay for the employment of these two in
dividuals while the mechanic, laborer,
clerk and farmer, who work infinitely,
harder, do not ns a rule, receive one-fourth
the compensation. But then talent must
be paid for. Bosh—talent! It makes one
sick to hear such sickoning trash, A hun
dred men in every county can bo found
who would jump at the chapce to take
those positions at §75 per month and who
would be just as competent as tlie average
present incumbent. The present unreas
onable salaries lead the office seeker to use
a corruption fund to secure position to,
and labor for a re-election. When the
»Y»nY» \o tOJlw popei nV'
sentiment from good hard sense and learn
to pay public men for the time employed,
as the merchant pays his help, demanding
the employement of time as in other de
partments of labor in private life, then
will dawn the lime long desired when
office shall seek the man and not the man
the office.—33ijou"Hills Times.
President Huncher arrived last Saturday
from a four months' eastern trip, which
time was spent in the interests of the
college. He reports a reasonably success
ful trip.
On Monday afternoon the trustees of the
college had a meeting. This was'the first
meeting of the trustees this year, and was
cheifly for the purpose of discussing plans
for the year. The unanimous decision of
the committee was to complete the build
ing and open the college September 1st
in fact there has been no wavering from
that plan since first adopted last year.
The trustees are now ready to re jeive bids
for heating aparatus. The college will
open September 1st.—Hot Springs Star.
We are glad to be able to make amends
for formers strictures upon the Black Hills
in the matter of contributions to the suf
fers in South Dakota. Deadwood has con
tributed about $180, the Knights of Labor
and Miner's Union in Lead City about
$150 and the same noble class of men in
Central City intend to give as much. It
was the lot of this writer to supervise the
shipment of a car load of setid grain gath
ered under the auspices of the of the
Farmer's alliance. The same is now en
route to Huron to the order of Governor
Mellette, -Dakota Rur'alist.
Every column of a newspaper contains
from twelve to twenty thousand distinct
pieces of metal, displacement of any of
which would cause a blunder or a typo
graphical errpr. And yet some people
lay claim to remarkable smartness ifthey
can discover an error in a newspaper
When some people find a word with a
wrong letter misplaced they are sure they
could spell that word right and go around
to the neighbors and tell that the editor of
paper so and so spelled a word wrong
once.—Ex,
Mr, V. E. Prentice, of Chicago, has been
here for several days looking up the Na
tional bank matter. On Monday evening
a meeting of the citizens was held at the
G. A. E. hall, Mr. Prentice stated that he
would like to establish.a bank here,but
that ho wanted the business men to be
come interested therein. About $20,000
of the stock will be held by Hot Springs
people, and the balance of $30,000 will be
held by outside parties.—Hot. Spings Star,
We believe this country can be made
tbe home for honest industry, where justice
can.be meted out, and having fought the
plunderers high and low this far, now that
they fire showing fear and begging for
terms, regard it as not the proper time to
let up. Tne odds have been fearful against
the under dog, and are right now, but his
courage is steadily improving.—(Kan.)
Nonconformist.
-PA115'
How strangely runs life's devious line,*
As through the world we rove—
A moment may change each dcBign,
And make or mar our love
In.the vast circle of our friends
We may not find a mute—
A stranger comes—the long search ends,
For we have met our late.
1
Ramd City.
STALLION.
A Percheron and Morgan stallion six years
old, A fine dapple gray good carriage weight
1,300. P. C. DAVIS, Spring Creek.
WANTED—TEAM OP MARES.
Lewis Eager on Spring creek (address Rapid)
wishes to purchase a team of mares, ten to
twelve huudred. Would like to exchange young
cattle in part payment.
FOR SALE.
Three registered thorough bred, October,
Poland China boar pigs. Three sows same age,
also one pair one-year-old. This stock is the
best bred in the Black Hills.
Custer City. VANDEVORT & Co.,
STOC:C RANCH AND RANGE FOR SALE.
Three hundred* and twenty acres located
within-eight miles of Rapid City. Eighty acres,
under fence. Forty acres broken. Well
watered and by its water holding the key to
one of the finest small ranges in the Black Hills.
Particularly adapted to horses or sheep.
Price SH.Oui), if taken within the next month.
Call or address TUB UNION oihee.
HORSES FOR SALE.
My band of Oregon mares with grade normau
and Cleveland bay, one two and three-year-old
colts. Must be sold by April 1st. Will sell the
whole bunch or any number to suit buyer.
Hermosa. GEO. HAWLEY,
FARM FOR SALE.
One hundred and sixty acres located between
Battle and Spring creeks. Well watered, ten
acres broken and under fence. House lGxLO
one and one-half storys, frame barn 10x84.
Adjoins a school sectiou aud and is surrounded
by a No. 1 range. C. M. PEABODY,
Sght
5^3
Somewhere upou the'stage of life*
Perhaps beyond the bear
The woman who will be my wife
16 roaming fancy free.
It may be years before we meet,
But, fair or foul the weather,
pome day Fate wm her task*
complete,
^And.biirigour lives together.
mtk
—Francis 8. Smith,
®c# #~,f
THE RED FRONT GROCERY
IfcV
V*
•Wffr'XfcN'X.
Bapid City.
LEG-AL NOTICES.
Notice—--Timber Culture*
U. S. Land Office, Rapid City, S. D.
March 2fi, 1890.
Complaint having been entered at this office
by'Elizabeth P. Hopkins against George H. Gill
for failure to comply with law as to Timber
Culture Entry No. 1744 dated Juue 3, 18Sft,
upon theSE of Section 15, Township 1 S,
Rama 9 E., B. H. M., in Pennington, county,
South Dakota, with a view to the cancellation
of said entry Contestant alleging that George
H. Gill failed to break, or cause to be broken
five acres on said tract during the first year
ending June 8, 3 887, and failed to break or
cause to be broken five acres on said tract tbe
second year ending Juue 8, 1888, and further
failed to plant or cause to be planted five acres
of trees, tree seeds or cuttings on said tract the
third year after entry ending June 8, 1889, as
required by law, and such failure still
continues.
The said parties are hereby summoned to ap
pear at this office on tbe 23d day of May, 1890,
at '0 o'clock a. m., to respond and furnish
testimony concerning said alleged failure.
10 J. p. LOSE, Register.
ESTRAYED.
From the residence of the seriber about Jan
uary 1
st, three head of horses described as fol
lows: One sorrel mare roached mane and tail,
blazed face aud branded LO on both hips three
ears old. Two gelding colts, two ye^rs old,
brown before shed, branded It-connected
on right shoulder. A suitable reward will be
paid for information leading to their recovery.
Hermosa, S. 0. WM. CHARLES.
TAKEN UP.
At the residence of the subscriber, on upper
Spring creek, a sorrel mare,
aboutt hree years old
white face, three white feet and dim brand on
left shoulder looks like a letter reversed. First
publication 18th April. ENDSLEY SPIKINGS.
Merchants desiring the trade of the
farmers o! Pennington county M'ill do
well by planting an ad in THE UNION. It
reaches more farm houseeihan any other
countv oaper.
LINCOLN
ANL» INSTITUTE OF PENMANSHIP, 8HORT HAND,
-pewrltine. and Telegraphy.. Laiveal Colleire
West. 600 Btmtcnta last rear. riii Hwnii
No vocation. Smilonts'can emer an
No vocation, snjilcnta can emer any week day.
Bludents prepared ior business in Icom 8 to 9
months. bend ior free Illustrated catalogue «ti
specimens ot penmanship. Address.
ULUlfklDaB & BOOSE. LiWu,Hies,
...•*! (ETl
\£«r,
THE RED FRONT GROCERY "1
Has engaged this space, but beinc too
busy to fill it will ask your indulgence
until next week. Drop in and see us at
any titne we. will be pleased to«howyou
our fresh stock and quote you prices.
In the future jve hope to interest you
through the columns of this paper.
Very Truly,
BARDENWERPER & BARBER,
Red Front, Main street.
Bardenwerper and Barber.
WM.
6RAMBER6,
THE PIONEER GROCER.
None but the Finest and Freshest Goods Handled.
with the world.
WASTASTD EXCHANGE.
Advertisements will be inserted in this col
umn at the exceedingly low price of five cents
per line of nonpariel type per month. No ad
vertisement taken for less than ten cents, and
in all cases cash must accompahy the order.
Copy for this column must be jn the office by
Thursday noon. The column is for the use of
farmers exclusively.
"I710H SALE, Shoats that will weigh 150 lbs
1? apiece, also lot of pi«s three monts old and
one nearly full blood Poland China Boar. En
quire at tills office.
*1 null SALE, A well matched span ot sorrel
JJ geldings, four years old. address S. D.
Heed, Link, S.J). 1
TjNOU SALE. Several hundred pitch pine posts
Jj ut the residence of the subscriber, near the 1
Victoria school house. CIIAA. GuiMBs.
Ti^OK SALE—A team of geldings, three and I
JD five years old, will weigh
1000. Also aspring
wagon nearly new, and set of light double har
ness. P. FniLZiER, Rapid City.
Sof
EED WHEAT—Geo. W. Somerhas 20( bfy
No. 1 Fife wheat for sale on his ranch,
two miles south of the Burton school house, at
seventy-five cents* per bushel.
"MPROVED RANCH for sale or rent.
W. W. CLEFT.
WANTED—By
Prices to Compete
Corner of Main and
Sixth Streets.
t"1
E-i
CD
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t)
Dakota.
in
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•nd
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55

pi
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2
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xn
a
a lady of experience, a posi­
tion as housekeeper in a private family,
'lie best of reference can be given. AddressBox
•1, Hermosa, Custer county, care of George
'awley.
11
FOll SALE.
A choice lot ot full-blooded Poland China
shoats male aud female. CUAS. ENSOR, BOX
Elder.
ro
yj
t—•
M. L. GRIMES
Black Hills Jewelry Manufactured to Or,
der in our own factory.
St. Joe Street, Rapid City
GATE CITY RESTAURANT
JOSEPH H. MIERS, Proprietor.
A Square Meal for 25 Cents,
Warm meals at all hours.
week, $4.00.
Board oy
Main Street, Opposite Mrs. Crandals-
Fremont, EMorn & Missouri
Valle
RAILROAD.
BETWEEN
Rapid City, Dakota.
FE8MV--SC.8P.RR*
AND
OMAHA, SlOtiX CITY,
CHICAGO, Sl\PAlJL«
AND
ALL POINTS
EAST, WEST, NORTH AND SOUTH.
THROUGH TICKETS AND BAGSA9E
::Cheeked to Destination.
Trains Depart:
GOING SOUTH
Chicago Express
Freight
4:35 p. pi.
11:00 a. m.
GOING NORTH
Black Hilla Express
Freight
7:05 a. m.
4:85 p. m.
For Farther Information Call on
C. Campbell. Agt•
Rapid City, Dak,
H. G, BUBT
Gep. Manager,
0
^3 E BUCHANAN,
Gsn.
Fasa.
"THE
for Consumption, Asth&a, Bronchitis, Dyspepsia, Catarrh
Hay Fever, Headache, Debility, Rheumatism1
Keuralgia and all Chronic and Nervous Dis
orders.
"The original and only Compound Oxygen
Treatment," Ors. Starkey & Paleii have been
using for the last twenty years.
Compound Oxygen—its Mode of Action nd
Results," will be mailed free to any address on
application. Mention THEUNION.
LOOK HERE I
Wm. Clemens is now prepared to do
all kinds of
BLACKSMITHING
And Wagon Work. Horse Shoeing
and Plow Work a Specialty.
Shop on Main Street, three doors west
of The Union ofiice, in Johnston
Taylor's old shop.
RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA.
Rapid City Laundry
E. J. MEINER, PROPRIETOR.
First-class laundry work ot any description
in shoit order at
Reasonable Prices.
Main street, between 8ixth and Seventh, next
to the'Star restaurant. '.
ATTENTION FARMERS.
Don't Forge to go to
ZED. C. SMITH,
t*if
Invites you to inspect their goods and
their prices/with those, you are in the
paying.
article he buys. We quote you a few of our "Sledge Hammers:"
HARDWARE AND TI1TWAEE.
Every article a rare bargain.
Our Price. OldPrice.
2-ft steel square $ 70 $2 00
28-inch cross cut saw... 50 .. 1 50
18-incli cross cut saw... 30 1 00
Keyhole sa.w 15 75
Small monkey wrench.. 10 25
12-incb monkey wrench 40 100
6-inch saw files 05 15
14-inch plow files.... 30 75
Steel hammers 35 1" 00
Good bit brace.'. 35 1 00
17-quart rinsing pans 35 1 00
14-quart rinsing pans 20 50
14-quart tin pail 25 50
10-qua.rt galvanized pail.... 40 75
6-quart milk pans 10 15
5-quart milk pans, 3 for..., 25 35
Silverine dustpans 10 2a
Glass oil cans 40 90
Coffee pots from 10 to 20
Preserving kettles from 10 to 30
Curry combs ,.5 to 15
Horse brushes 10 to 50
NOTIONS.
Our Price Old Pilce
papers tin tacks 05 20
papers pins 05 20
papers safety pins 05 10
papers hair pins 05 10
papers stove polish 05 20
papers sharp needles 05 15
2 spools sewing cotton 05 10
spools button-hole twist 05 15
And so on with no limit.
DRS. STARKEY & PALEN'S
Treatment by Inhalation.
.TRADEMARK^ REGISTERED*
mmimM.
1680
AroH Street,
FTIILACTA* PA*
i&itM
s.s
Seventh
Store When You
Agent.
NEBB
Street, Opposite C. O. D.
want any
BiAtar^iiTHfire
We believe that the motto, "Live and let live," is a surer guide to success than "Getall yon can and keep all
yon get," trusting that Small Profits and Large Sales will carry ns to the front Quicker than the usual awful
prices which drive the customer to send east for his goods and make him see the eztortion'in ^e.price of every
LADIES' FURNISHING GOODS.
Barer bargains than ever.
Our Price. Old Price.
Ladies Jerseys $ 40 75
Ladies Jerseys, all wool 85 150
Jersey jacket 1 45 2 25
Fine all wool jackets 3 50 fV 5 00
Better all wool jackets.. 4 25 7 00
EMBROIDERY.
Choice can't go wrong where all is of the
choicest.
Inch pattern Hamburg 02 05
Extra fine Hamburg. 10 20
12-inch and excellent 25 40
Swiss embroidery 05 to 20
All-over embroidery 60 to 80
Flouncing, 24-inch 35 to 55
Flouncing, 48-inch 40 to 90
AH linnen Torchon lace 02 to 12%
Hand-made Torchon lace...... 10 to 20
Cotton Torclionsperdoz.yds. 10 to 20
LADIES' UNDERWEAR.
Elegance and Economy Combined.
"Jersey knit gauze vests 12% 25
Regular made 40 75
3 pairs good hose '. 25 45
2 pairs excellent hose 25 50
Seamless fast black hose 15 30
HATS
Too numerous to mention, and war
ranted to wear over two ears, or money
reiunded.
We are dividing profits with our cus
tomers on Neckties, Suspenders and
Handkerchiefs.
We intend keeping most everything the public needs and if you appreciate ®ur endeavors to give you
honest goods at eastern figures, your increasing patronage will only make it possible for us to further lower
our already unheard of prices. We only ask that you visit us, look over our varied stock, learn our prices
and then whenever you need an article we feel sure that you will always get it at "The Fair."
LEEDS CO.,
oiRia-iifcT-A-TaiRs OP LOW PIBZCBS-
BLUE FRONT, MAIN STREET.
VOLUNTEER
1
~4. g.
THOMAS SWEENEY
FOR FARM IMPLEMENTS.
'....u
SxV-l
—1s\ I '.
GAW^
-H- W' v',.
^'-PARAtta
MjOVt MENT
AOJUSTABtX^
c\ARCH &
PARLIN & _*"•
ORFNDORFf CO camtoh.iu
i-aoftontiri .'"-""i' -—l r»4r
LOOK HERE-W
I am neither closing out or selling
at cost as a number of merchants
are advertising to do to deceive
the public. I have no creditors
pounding me on the back—I pay
for what I get and can sell you
goods right. Call and be con
vinced.
THE GROCER.
CORNER ST. JOE AND 8TH STREETS, RAPID CITY.
Congdon and Henry Hardware Company.
l.i WholesaJe and Retail ,, ,,
HARDWARE AND IMPLEMENTS.
BEST
/S.PRING
LVER
OFFERED
TO TMC T^'ADT
ms)
4
GENTS FURNISHING GOODS. 3
Rarest Bargains tor All.
STATIONERY.
Our Price.
5 quires note paper 15
5 quires better note paper 25
7 rubber tipped pencils... 05
2 better pencils 05
2 bottles ink 05
2 papers envelopes 05
CALL ON
&
'«N iassff"
compare
habit of
Our price Old Price
Good weight underwear... 25
Balbriggan underwear 35
Fine quality underwear... 45
Good overalls...., 45
9 ounce Denim overalls.. 70
Cottonade pants 1 15
All wool pants 1 75
vHM/V1*
STOCK
Canton Clipper Plows, Harrows and
Cultivators. -The Celebrated Cant^fi^
Sulky TricycL Plow, Volunteer Cultiva
tors, Canton Lever Harrows, £vens Corn
Planters,'Check Rowers, Etc.,- Wagon*,.
Buggies, Carts, Etc.
Mammoth Stodk Low Pricen.- .We
Won'tbe Undersold
"W
BO
Ppeo
S?-4?75 S3
75
1 00 $£
1 50
3 50
Look before you leap. Look at our
stock and then leap for joy.
Our Price Old Price
Unlaundried white shirts 50. 75
Laundried white shirts 75 125
Work shirts 35 to 55
Summer flannel shirts 50 to 1.30
6 pairs striped socks 25 worth 45
3 pairs fine socks 20 worth 30
2 paira seamless socks 25 worth 50
OldPrice
TABLE LINEN, OIL CLOTH, ETC.
Turkey red damask 40 worth 00
Unbleached damask 50 worth 75
Table oil cloth 25 worth 50
Shelf oil cloth 10 worth 20
WINDOW SHADES.
Six-foot curtains, mounted on
Hartshorn rollers 30 75
with border 35 90
Dead finish Holland with border, 45 to
60
4,
:.
I
4T,

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