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News and citizen. [volume] (Morrisville, Vt. ;) 1881-current, June 18, 1891, Image 1

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NEWSPAPER LAWS.
name or another w J
r "0t- r-P8ible for t pay-
2 If a person orders his paper diseontin
ned, he must pay all arrearaU rt J"
lisherraay continue to send i ftu Z PUb:
is made, and collect the wholeamheth
er the paper u, taken from the ofC or not
3. The Court, have decided that refusing
to take newspapers and periodicals from iho
postoffice, or tetnoving aPnd feavfn'g hem
called for, w prima facie evidence of fraud
' ADVERTISING ItATKS.
pack. iiTirtiirri,
One column (20 inches) f 04 .IK
On-hlf column (13 inches) CO
One-fourth column fMi inches) .. 40 (H
One-eiith column (4Mi inches). .......... .to m
Oneighth column (.V-i Inches) ar. K
One-eleventh column (2H inc hc)...... ao (Hi
One-sixteent h column ( 1 Inches)..... . 15.IXI
Oiie-twanty-aixth column ( 1 Inch)..... tt.txi
Ono-fifty-aecond column (Himb).. S.Utf
rmAonowAL run or 4 tub cuhu as roiiowai
One Insertion, 1-1 Oth Four months, B-intha
Onemonth. 2-1 ntha Five month, flloth
Two month, a iUtln Six month. 7-10th
Three inonth,4-10( hi tight month, 9-10lba
Business not ices, 10 cent perline whlnwr'
tion, but no insertion for leia tbnn f0 cent.
Probate nnd Commissioner' notice (3 ineer
tions) fa.r0. Lilierntion. Kstrnys, 4c, (.1
Insertion)! 1. SO. Icgal not ice (.H insertions)
10 cent per line. Card of Thank. 50 rent.
Obituary Notices, 5 eta. wr line ol 8 word.
t
JOB PRINTING
OF ALL KINDS
PROMPTLY EXECUTED
AT LOW RATES.
VOL X. NO. 33.
MORRISVILLE AND HYDE PARK, VERMONT, THURSDAY; JUNE 18, 1891.
TERMS $1.50.
.HEWS, AND CITIZEN,
f VT T-. ...... .
.. iitws r8Taoiistiel in 1877 1
- tCiTiZEN Established in 1872
(United November 15, 1881. J
Published every Thursday bv
; LAMOILLE PUBLISHING CO.
- Entered at the Morrisville Postoffice
as second class matter.
St.J.&LC.R.R.TimeTable.
i
r
M
I
- :
' S
JL
' as
. -it
h o
a
a
a
H
'I
BpiCjI
5 J3
00 00 30 t- b C- .
.-. . . , -A ,. ... .
sswidvj I a. - 5 z- r1 3 : s. s
Ii m - cs c. o"ao
H
. to
JXJST
500 Yards Ginghams, good Dress
styles, at 8 cents.
Ladies' Hosiery ; a good line in all
the popular colors.
Ladies' and Gent's Gauze and Bal
briggan Underwear, a nice
assortment. '
SHOES. SflOBS.
, WHAT A BOY CAN DO.
There are some things that a boy can do,
Hecmi whistle so loud that theair turns blue,
He can tnuke all sounds of beast and bird,
And a thousand noises never heard.
He can crow or cackle, or he can cluck
As well as a rooster, hen or duck ;
He can hark like a dos:, he can low like acow,
And a cat itself can't beat his "me-ow."
He has sounds that are ruffled, striped and
plain ;
He can thunder by as a railway train,
Stop at the stations a breath, and then
Apply the steam nnd be of again.
lie hs all his powers in such command
He can turn rhrht into a full brass band,
With all of the instruments ever played,
As he makes of himselt a street puradc.
Toil can tell that a boy is very ill
If he's wide awake and keeping still ;
But earth would be God bless their noise!
A dull old place if there were no boys.
BUSINESS CARDS.
, , I. M. GEOKGE & CO.,
! I. M. GEOROB. . 1 HARDING.
" "tOMMISSIOX MEKCH '.NTS In butter,
I j iHcse cs-irs:. beans, ooultrv. maple sucar
and syrup. Also dealers in Foreign and Domes
tic iruits. Consignments solicited and orders
solicited. 114 South Market St.. BOSTOX, Mass.
... u POWERS & POWERS.
A TTORXE1S AT I. AW.
l. Hall's lilock, Morris ville, Yt.
H H. POWERS. GEO. M. POWERS.
' A. A. NIXES,
ATTtiKXEY AT LAW, Morrhvili-K, Vt.
Asrent for Life and Fire Insurance. In
surance placed at lowest rates. Also Pension
Claim Agent. Collections a specialty.
Office in Hall's Block.
E. E. FOSTER,
MANUFACTURER and dealer in all kinds of
Marble and Granite. Work (iuaranteed
as Good and Prices as Low as any in Vermont,
i'ortland Street. : Morkisvillk, Vt
. f 1'. II. MLLXER,
YETERINART SURGEON, graduate Mont
, real Veterinary College, Honorary Fellow
Montreal -Medical Association, Veterinary Sur
geon to .Suelburne Farms. Calls promptly at
tended. Office, 110 Church Street,
' CV . - BCKLINGTOJr, Vt.
; V.. J.. A. ROBINSON,
DENTAL SURGEON, Morrisvillk, Vt.
Office "opeif Sundays from 12 to 1 p. M. for
extracting. Patients from out of town, please
make encasements bv mail iu advance.
'G. W. DOTY,
PRACTICAL UNDERTAKER. Finest goods
tlia market affords. Ice box and embalmer.
-V Morrisville, Vt
: AX7STIN BELKNAP,
So. 11 Fultou Street. Boston.
TWEAfcEBINffUfter. Chr. Bwjii,nH fro"
"Xj 'visions.
In addition to our regular line of Boots and Shoes, an assort
ment that can not be equalled in the county, we have
put in a stock of Base Ball, and Tennis Shoes,
suitable for both sexes.
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR PAINTS, OILS, BRUSHES, K,
SCREEN DOOHS!
There are no flies on you when you use Screen Doors made
of the proper material. We have the Wire Cloth
and Corners for making the best and most
durable Screen Doors.
Lots of Other Goods.
No time to enumerate.
Call and see
show goods.
us. No trouble to
C. CRANE & SON, Hyde Park, Vt.
The Largest Stock of
WV'i'U 4
vTi" r i int. ii
v v n v v r-a n t r - r iirn r
Line C
jORDEK
CLOTH
i BoST
'(an BeFc
WATERMAN'S
Morrisville, Vermont.
Our spring stock of Suits, Overcoats, Hats and Caps,
Furnishing Goods, &c, is all in and was never so complete.
to be found at
Ij Magazine Font
. : WM.. AV. 'JGE3JGE. L I).,
PHYSICIANAND SURGEON. Ruccetwor to
Dr. Cooper. Calls promptly atteniled to.
- - . Hyde Park, Vt.
II. X. WAITE, M. D.
T rw VORKand Vermont References. Rce-
Jl ular Physician and Surgeon. Special at-
enti i given to tlie treatment ot enronic ana
Nervous Diseases. Omce and Kesuience pt?r
nianently located Joimsos, Vermont.
, E II. BUSIIXEIiL, M. D.
iS'llVSICIAN AND SURGEON.
JL , Jeffersosvillb Vt.
Our Men's Suits i
Two Dollars : Boy's,
ren's, from Two to Ten Dollars.
ange in price from Six to Twenty
from Five to Ten "Dollars : Child-
IIALIi & jonxsox,
E. .L Hall. E. H. Johnson.
PHY8ICIANS AND SURGEONS. Office
hours until 9 K. M. ; from 1 to 3 and 6 to 8 P.
M. Office at Dr. Hall's residence,
i Morrisville. Vt.
T. J. IIOIiBROOK, M. D.,
. "OH YSICIAN & SURGEON. Office at my for
JL mer resilience on Jlcaant St.
1 ' morrisville, vt
Men's Overcoats, Five to Fiiteen Dollars.
A lar"-e line of Shirts in laundered and unlaundered.
i Try one of our short bosom laundered Shirts you will like
them. Our line ol
Collars, Cuffs and Ties
is right. Come in and see us before you buy.
O. M. WATERMAN, Morrisville, Vt.
F. X. RAND & CO.,
WMMLSSION MERCHANTS and Wholesale
Dealers in Country Produce. Butter. Eggs.
roiaioes, rruiis, ate. .;onsign nieius souciteu.
Corner ol Granite ana Jtssex streets,
Havekiiill. Mash.
F. N. Rand. B. F. Leighton. J. Webster.
TO "THE
T
FARMEBS OF VERMONT.
It has incidentally come to
my knowledge that you oc
casionally .make complaints
because of the small sums re
ceived for your Dairy skins.
The fault is your own, for if
you would take them off and
properly care for them you
would rarely find a skin that
would bring you less than 50
cents, and a jrreat many of
4-V r -v limn 1 r v r rr tAii r
70 and even 80 cents each.
Poor skins, like poor butter,
are poor property and bring a
poor price. It will cost you
only" a penny for a postal card
on which to send me your ad
dress, to secure full printed
directions as to the proper
method of taking off and caring
for your calf skins. I will very
gladly mail these to you free
DostDaid. if vou will send me
. your name and so request.
In most of the towns of Ver-
-mont I have buyers but in
localities where I have none I
would suggest that a half doz
en farmers club together and
ship their skins in quantities of
25 or more in which case 1
will pay all freights after de
livery at R. R. depot. I cannot
allow you wholesale prices in
towns where I have a buyer but
where I have none I will
gladly arrange with any reli
able farmer who is willing to
attend to the matter of collect
ing skins taken off in his
vicinity, and in such case will
of course allow the buyer's
commission.
C. S. PACE,
Hyde Park. Vt,
CRYSTAL! GEM SPECTACUE5
AND EYE G LASSES
Exclusive professional atten
tion to the scientific adjustment of
Spectacles.
Will visit Cambridge, profes
sionally, on July 6th and 7th.
Will visit Morrisville, Hyde
Park and Johnson once in about
two months.
At home office, Wolcott, last
week in every month.
MALVERN STOCK FARM
1891 - STALLIOJNS - 1891
"HieHLAND W."
10,000.
sirR Ahdallah Wilkes. 7262. by George Wilkes, 591. Dam, Black Venus
hv Trnrmides. 1257. by Administrator. 3o7; becona Dam, llelosie. by (Jlirton
l'ilot 2026 byl'ilot, Jr., 12; Third Dam, Norfolk Belle, by Mambrino Chief
11, dam of Ironsides, by C. M. Clay, 22.
TERMS, $25.00 TO WARRANT.
n-u Willis take ihe lead as trotters and campaigners and sell for the
at. auction or private sale, so if you expect to get the fancy prices
u,&""" ? . TITi : 1 K.o,l in tY,a faahinn
you must iau iuu uue uiccu m .....
299.
TERMS, $10 00 TO
For extended pedigrees, &c, address
Morrisville, Vt., May 12. 1891.
"WARRANT.
C. R. PAGE.
Bay," and began my story.. By night
I had two pages written and couldn't
seem to think of anything to say
next. Madge, too, nun Had hercram
blcr "standing with uplifted hand
ready to plunge ins dagger," but
some way she couldn t seem to end
the situation as she wished.
Day after day we wrestled with
these imaginary men. The girl of my
tale was already and willing I had
no trouble with her; but I wanted my
hero to suffer some severe heart ex
periences, and I found it no easy task
,. , . . i i .
to pun mm iuio nuu one oi nis va
rious difficulties. I wrote and wrote,
and then would tear up my writing
and try again.
Madge, too, had her trials. Some
days she shot her gambler and then
she would revive him and stab him,
and once she poisoned him, but this
style of death never seemed to satisfy,
her. "It must not ieem melodra
matic," she said ; "ittn'rba artkle'
: GET YOUR JOB PRINTING ri
.A.T TlilS OFFICE.
BY E. G. RICE.
For months before I graduated
from AVellesley College, some years
ago, I was troubled with the perplex
ing problem of how to get a very nice
graduating dress at a very low cost;
for my father, a village merchant in
Maine, could ill afford to spend more
money than was absolutely necessary
for my regular expenses.
"I do wish I could think of some
way to earn the money for my dress,"
T said one day to my inseparable
friend, Madge Bennett.
"Why don't you write stories for
the papers?" she said impulsively.
"What papers?" said I with sur
prise. "Why any papers all papers mag
azines , q ua rterlies, 1 i ter a ry sy n d icates
anything or anybody," she answer
ed, springing to her idea in her usual
enthusiastic way.
"But I've no talent for writing," I
protested.
"Yes, dear, you must have," she
urged, effusively. "You don't know
how often I've stood enraptured to
hear you go on telling some yarn
that I knew" (kissing me fervently)
"hadn't a word of truth in it. Oh, I
know you could be a great novelist!
Think of being pointed out by strang
ers on the street as the celebrated
Millicent Warner of Warner's Falls!
What rapture! "
"But what could I write a story
about?" said I, ignoring her little re
flection on my veracity at times.
"Write a love story. Everybody
likes them," she answered.
"But I've never had a love affair,
andlnevercan have," Iadded mourn
fully, "for there isn't a man in my
town that I'd look at for a lover, and
you know I've got to stay at home
while the other girls take their turn
away at school. I know it's predes
tinated that I shall be an old maid,
but I don't like the outlook," said I,
telling the truth, for once at least.
" 'Tisn't of the least consequence,"
Madge said, encouragingly. "Feople
never need toknowabout thesubiects
they write about. Why, all the books
about the management of children
are"writtGTi "by old mnirtft" n? "O"
Fuppuno mat me people wno write
Lord This and Lady That ever saw
a real lord, even with an opera-glass?"
"I don t know," said I with simplic
ity.
"Why, of course not, she rattled
on; "nait tne stones oi travel and
adventure are made up by men who
have never been outside of Coney Is
land. Indeed, the less you really
know about a subject the better off
you are, you see, because you're not
hampered byfacts and youriinagina
tion can have full scope."
I'm atraid I couldn t succeed that
way, l said musingly.
"Indeed you could," she still assert
ed. "Last year my cousin, Joe
Schuyler, who always has livetl in
New York and has just graduated at
Columbia not even a country college
like Harvard took charge of the ag
ricultural department of a city paper
while the regular editor went to Eu
rope for three months, and he got
along finely. He just hunted over
the rural exchanges and rewrote their
articles, using a little different word
ing, that was all."
"Didn t he make any blunders? I
asked.
"No, not in the paper," she said,
"but he did get into a bit of a scrape
for a farmer wrote him asking for
more explicit directions for using a
new remedy lor pip in chickens, and
as Joe is full of fun, he wrote the
farmer a private letter sending him a
prescription about like this:
SturapuH woodus, - Regular size.
HatelietuB, - - One application.
Shako well before uninir.
This i an absolute and instantaneous cure.
So the farmer drove off five miles to
the nearest town, to the drug store,
where the clerk assured him he'd been
trifled with and that it was all a joke.
That enraged the farmer and he took
it into the county paper, which hap
pened to be published m that town,
and as the editor was a prohibition'
ist, and hated the city daily anyway,
he made the most of poor Joe's joke
and all the county stopped their sub
scriptions in consequence. But Joe
didn t care.
Didn't tho head editor care?"
asked.
"Dear me! I don't know. Joe
didn't tell nie what ho said. But Mil-
iceut, do try. I know you could write
a sweet love story, or a yachting ad
venture.
"Why, I never was on a yacht in
my life, 1 remonstrated.
"But I assure you, dear, it isn't of
anv consequence if vou never were.
Now, if you'll nevre, never divulge
my secret, I'll tell you that I am writ
ing a story myseit, anu amaoing just
what I've advised you to do, for my
storv is named "A JNiiyht with dam
blors." and I've located it on the
Mississippi River steamer. It's a
thrilling take, and I've got a place
where one man is just going to stab
another.
"Do read it to me! " I begged, but
Madire would not unless 1 would
acrree to write one and read it to her
and so this was the way my first
attempt to write for the press came
about.
I took her advice. I not only wrote
a love story, but I placed the lovers
on a vachfc and set them afloat in
Geonrian Bay probably because
knew less of that sheet of water than
of most others.
"That's all right," said Madge
cheerfully. "Send it to some inland
newspaper. The editor himself won't
know anv more about it than you do
If he sends vou fifty dollars which I
think would be a fair price for your
storv. vou won't care whether the
yacht sails bow or stern first, and i
you do happen to get it wrong, folks
will think the boat has got some
new kind of rig on her."
So I got a fresh block of paper,
wrote my title, "Love in Georgian
Each day we asked each other with
our first waking breath :
"Will he propose to-day?" and
"Will he be dead by night?"
Finally a day came when we each
resolved to end the suspense beiore
night, and in the recreation hour we
took our writing-blocks and wander
ed off to a quiet place under the Well
esleytree8. agreeing to make some
sort of an ending before we went
back ; but the gambler was still alive
and the willing maid was still trying
to lare on the reluctant lover, when
the sound of distant thunder came
to our ears and a dark cloud rising in
the west warned us to return to
shelter.
It gave us both a new idea, how
ever, and we each resolved to work a
thunder-storm into our tales.
The result was better than our
hopes. The gambler was made to
deck just as a flash of lightning struck
the emoke-stack of his steamer, and
he was knocked senseless and then
robbed by his fiendish companions
and cast overboard where "he sunk
to rise no more."
Madge laid her tale aside with a
sigh.
"It will save sending for an under
taker, any how," she said, "if I drown
him instead of stabbing him ; so, on
the whole, I think its the better way.'
As for 1113' couple, they were idly
drifting on an ebbing tide (I didn't
know then that there was no tide in
Georgian Bay), when dark clouds be
gan to roll up, and the muttering
thunder began to reverberate among
the darkly wooded hills. They has
tily rowed to the shore, tied their
yacht to a tree, and began climbing
a rugged precipice, while the maid
clung in terror to the soul-tossed. It
was too suggestive. He begged to
defend her through all life's pathway,
and in well-feigned surprise she mur
mured her assent just as the first
drops of the bursting storm fell and
they reached a shelter. "It was a
happy omen of future days," were
my closinsr words.
"My maiden is ready to don her
solitaire diamond ring," T declared tri
umphantly to Mil.4ii wiiJLissed
oacn oilier ecru.u'-'it,;htl!tr ,,
I knew you couit) jit, juiny,
she said. "Now shall you sign your
own name to it? "
"No. indeed." I replied; "I've de
cided to use a man's name, for I think
it would be more in accordance with
my style of composition. I shall be
known as George Warner."
Madge said she did not shrink from
public gaze. She would use her own
name.
We copied our stories carefully and
sent them each to one of the two best
known magazines, and then began to
watch the daily mail for an answer.
Vv hue we continually asserted to eacn
other that we hadn't the least idea
they would be accepted, we each were,
in our own minds, as continually
planning as to how we could spend
the fifty dollars that we duly expected
to receive.
Havinjr heard from neither story
at the end of a fortnight, we conclud
ed that the stories had been accepted
and were waiting to be published be
fore being paid for, and settled back
quite composedly in that conviction.
Each day l planned a new way io
spend my money.
Since we ve been so successiui in
these articles, let us write some more,
said Madge, and we did.
This timeshetook a lovestory.and
had a West Point cadet elope with a
Southern heiress, and then both of
them went to the President to ask
pardon, and he reinstated the cadet
in the military academy, at the same
time allowing him to board at the
hotel with his bride, to the envy ot
the whole corps.
I told a true story about a 1' rench-
Canadian boy from Three Kivers who
came to our own town to earn money
for his widowed mother, and was
crushed in a jam of logs, and how
kind the rough' men were to him, and
how thev sent him home to die be
cause he longed so to see his mother
once more.
We wrote these stories rapidly and
sent them to the two next best mag
azines of our choice. Madge said we
might just as well become known at
once to the world otuiiTa as to
limit our scope to the circle reached
by any one periodical. In our imag
inations we now had each earned fifty
dollars more, and as the proceeds
seemed to accumulate so well we de
cided to write all that we could find
time for.
It made a serious inroad in my
pocket-money to obtain the needed
stamps to send the articles away and
and also to provide for their being
returned, and Madge suggested that
we save this last expense, as it was
evidently uncalled for. Then grad u
ation time came, and we had to leave
each other and the place we loved so
much. .
We debated as to whether to write
to all the various editors about our
articles, and notify them of our
change of address, but finally decided
to leave word with the postmaster at
Wellesley and await results. I had
been sorely tempted to run in debt
for some graduating extravagances,
being sure I could pay for them out
of my ''magazine fund," as I now
called my expected fifty dollar pay
ments, but had bravely resisted the
temptation, as it was contrary to all
my home training, by thinking how
happy 1 would be later to repay inv
father for some of his generous out
lay on my pleasure.
When 1 got back to Maine I took
our village postmaster into mv con
fidence enough to persuade him to re
tain any letters addressed to George
Warner, ior uenvery to myseit alone
One alter auotner, in the course of
the next six months, those various
rejected manuscripts found their way
back to Warner's Falls, and time af-
finid" ditnin
Paily J was
more and more thankful that I had
not left any debts to bo met from
that prospective income.
A formal printed blank, stating
with courtesy that my article was
not available, accompanied each one
but the one of the Canadian-boy, to
which the editor added in a foot-note
the words, "If written with morecare
this would probably be accepted
somewhere. Try your local paper."
Madge wrote me that all of her pro
ductions had been used in due time
to light her grate fires, but she was
convinced that editors were time
severs and could not recognize genius
unless a big name were signed to an
article. ''',
I now felt very humble, but rewrote"
the story suggested . and sent it to
our county paper with, many misgiv
ings. The. editor wrote me a kind
note saying that he could not afford
tbf 'pay for contributions, , but he
would bs'orlad to publish any good
glroriartieli'S wnlTrinrott t hoseterm s
and I soon had the inexpressible plea
sure of seeing my story in print, and
of sending a copy to Madge, who un
selfishly satisfied my longing with
her ready and effusive, though truly
genuine, sympathy and praise.
1 hen I sent my first story, "Love
in Georgian Bay," and another en
titled "The Bride of Castle Chalheur,'
but the editor returned them both
with a note saying that they not
adapted to his paper, and suggesting
that I send him several brief letters
about college-girl lifeat Wellesly; and
headded: "Write simply about things
you know about."
I re-read all my silly, stilted stories
and recognizing their utter trashiness
put them in the kitchen fire. I could
not help letting a tear fall as I
thought of the "magazine fund" with
which I could never surprise my
father's emptied purse. Some time
afterward, however, I wrote Madge a
long and true tale. The unexpected
man had come to pass, even in our
town that I had scorned, and the
subject of my true tale was "Love ia
V arner s r alls. I rank Leslie s News
paper.
Moral Backbone.
Without a stiff moral backbone, a
sound condition of themental organ
ization is impossible. Yet this es
sential element of mental stability is
rather rare. eakness of the moral
spine is in "fact much more common
than disease of the material verte
brae. It is a sad disability, and
works an infinity of mischief. Those
who are afflicted by it not only
wrong themselves through its influ
ence, but also inhict serious evils up
on society. They lend money which
m some cases they can ill spare, to
persons whom it does not benefit;
become security for people they do
not know, and are mulcted in the
amount of the guarantee; recom
mend as worthy of the confidence of
other men in whom they have no
confidence themselves, and are dis
honored by the conduct of their
proteges; bestow places on individu
als they do not esteem; live in a
munrwr which - iinither thoir covi
ecieiice nor tueir uustc aiuvi'a, uuu
all this because they have not
strength enough in their moral spine
to bear up against the pressure of
importunity and temptation. Where
there is a natural tendency to this
kind of weakness it should lie checked
in early life, for it rapidly grows
worse by indulgence, says the New
Y'ork Ledger. "He has had an ill
education," said the elder Brutus,
" who has not been taught to deny,"
A peremptory negative at the right
time has saved many multitudes
from perdition. A weak assent at
the wrong time has been the ruin
of millions.
ter time my "magazine
jshed correspondingly.
Our Patriot Dead at Chalmette.
New Orleans, La., Juno C,1S01 .
Messrs. Editors : It was my good
fortune both this year and last to
attend the Memorial Day exercises
at the beautiful Government Ceme
tery in New Orleans, La., Chal
mette. An account in detail would
not be of sufficient interest to war
rant publication in your columns,
but as I walked among the honored
graves and saw so many familiar
names on the head-stones even
those of persons whom I had played
with whin a boy, nnd of my own
kin it filled my soul with emotion,
and caused me to, feel that I was here
once more in a bit of ".God's coun
try." '.Every blade of grass over the
sacred, mounds, every jwautiful , tree
and flower-was looked upon with,
great reverence. It occurred to nie
that other Vermonters might be in
terested iu knowing '" where they
have laid limi, " ind tlrnt wiiix ,
those names might also bring to
mind faces and scenes now nearly
forgotten. Incidentally I will say
that Chalmette is a beautiful sjiot on
the shore of the Mississippi Itiver,
about five miles below the Canal St.
landing. The G. A. II. chartered
two steamboats Memorial Day to
(onvey passengers, ine ride down
and back was a delightful one. Mag
nolias, jassamines and other fra
grant flowers on both sides of the
great river filled the a ir with delicious
perfume, as if nature would add her
silent testimonial to the beautiful
sentiment of the day. Bishop Mal
lalieu of the Methodist Church deliv
ered the address. The names are
from the records of the cemetery.
Some of them were first interred in
other places and removed here. Dear
old Lamoille furnished her full quo
ta. Perhaps when 1 have more leis
ure I will describe some of the places
in and around this singular city, but
have no time now. C. C. Mouse.
Herewith is a list of the Vermont
ers buried there :
To.
AM rich, J. U K
Allen, (. H A
Allen, David (i
Allard, C. W .
Alirer, L. L .
Allen, W. F U
Archambuult, ). T A
Arna, Jos t
Atwood, 1. II
Austin, Grafton
Averv, S. S
Bailey, S. K
Ilailey, .S. A
Ilailey, Amos
Bailey, J. V
lialch. r. M
Barnes. W. W
Bates, G. D
Barber, II. .1
Bainl.J. W
Batchelder, .1. L
Bartlett, C. AV
Benerd, S. S
Benson, H. M
Berry, Kieliard
Bic kford, I). M
Bishop, S. B
Blossom, T. C
Blood, C. W
BoRue, Chester
liogne, Osear
Bodith, l'eter
Brown, A. C
Brown, W. A
Brown, J. A
Broekman, U. M
..I)
C
K
i:
K
i:
K
K
K
...Batlery
I
K
G
A
A
A
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II
K
II
II
II
II
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I)
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:::::: ..ic
i)
ii
A
:
A
i)
i)
B
1st Battery
K
2.1 Battery
F
, (i
K
.....0
II
.....1st Battery
F
1st, Battery
2d Battery
K
A
Why The Parson Had To Resign.
Twas only a little hen, with a
lopped comb and a flushed face, that
broke up the pastorate of an able
Maine parson. She used to sneak
under the fence, you know, just the
way hens do always, tiptoe across
the' grass border with the minuet
step and then the elder's garden had
to take it. Of course it was aggra
vating; did you ever watch a hen
at this job ? She trips carelessly into
the middle of the garden bed; she
cocks her head; a careless look comes
into her eye; she balances partners
with a flip and a scrape to the right,
a flirt and a kick to the left, a double
shuffle and a grand skirt dance flour
ish. Then she looks for grub. Well,
that parson saw the whole thing
for days; same hen, same gestures,
and she came in miraculously, aston
ishingly, through a new hole every
day. Then came at length wrath
and a girding of the loins ; a gun,
bang! dead hen floating upon the
placid breast of a river eddy. The
current washed the corpse upon the
neighbor's strand, and then the
neighborhood heard the tale. The
atrocity was lamed vigorously, and
the poor parson found that he was
not to be an assassin and the leader
of the parish at the same time.
Therefore his farewell sermon. Dex
ter (Me.) Gazette.
o
Testing A Trunk.
THE PALE -FACED MAX WHO IIAI NOT
LOST THE GIMP OF HIS OLU TKADE.
A slim-faced man with agrave-ynrd
cough was inspecting some trunks in
front of a Grand street store the
other day, says the New York World
when the proprietor of the place
appeared and asked :
" Looking for a trunk, sir ? "
"Yes."
"Here's the best $4 trunk ever
made, nnd I'm the only one that
sells them less than $.V
"No good," replied the pale-faced
man with a sorrowful shake of his
head. " One of these trunks wouldn't
stand the journey from here to
Poughkeepsie."
"What! I'll warrant them to go
around the world ! Take hold of one
and bang it about and convince
yourself."
" Do vou give me leave to wrestle
with one?"
" Of coarse I do ! Take right hold."
The man with the grave-yard cough
drew in a full breath, called out:
" Kcho-nec-ta-dav. " as it warning a
car-load of passengers, and then
reached for the t runk. " Rip ! " went
one of the handles "r-i-p! w.'nt
the other, and ns he stood it. on
end and upset it and flopped it back
n ""a in one hinge busted loose and the
cover split in two. With a twist of
the wrist he gave it a slam-bang,
which completed the wreck, and with
a bow to the trunk-man, he joined
the crowd and disappeared.
" Upon my soul ! " gasped the pro
prietor as he viewd the ruins, " but I
made a big mistake in him! He's a
baggage master instead of a d.vi'ig
traveler."
iiutier, ui .
Bucbee, C. P
Bush, A. 1'
Burns. I). G
Butler, Abraham
Buckley, II
Buxton, B. M
Ball, Elishn
Burnap, V.S
(,'arlton, G. ('
Carson, G. J
Carr.H. C
Connell, John
Cnnale, G. 8
Chase, W. E
Chamberlin, B. T. ..
Chamberlin, Ira
Chaffee, Jerome
Clark. -S. B
Clark, B. F
Clark, John
Clafflin, G. W...
Clement. J. H-...
Coleexove. James E
Cloiifrh, p.M IstBattery
Clouirh, Joel C
Corliss, A. A B
Cook, A. C ti
Comstoc k, Joseph 2d Battery
Cowan, C. E II
Colegrove, J. S K
Connor, M. V. B I-'
Cornwell, Wm B
Cranston, II. K 1st Battery
Criiss, H. A
Cutler, C. T K
Davis, J II J'!
DaviB, I.eander r
Davis, Thomas .1
Daniels. C. H 1
Durlinpc. Jos. G
Derby. II. N '
Din, Edward B
Douse, Lewis...: 1st Battery
Draper, Alanson I
Durkee, Nelson I
Dust in. Timothy 1st Battery
Eastman, II. V D
English, S. J C
Fair, S. C -'d Battery
Fairbanks, C. T o
Farmer, Geo G
Farnham. C. U K
Fitch, J. L V
Fish, A. L iv
Flanders, J. W K
Fletcher. H. C. K
Foote, Dennis D
Fowler, L. L K
Foster, Lzekiul u
Fruiier, Aupistus A
Freeman, I), t
Gale, B. B H
George. Joseph C
Gibbs, 1'. G I
Goodrich, -M. V. W u
Gould, Goodrich 1st Battery
H
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
s
7
H
8
H
M
7
H
H
7
7
s
7
H
8
H
7
7
7
7
7
H
7
7
7
7
o
7
8
8
7
7
8
7
7
7
Gray, W. K....
Green, J. B
Graw, C. H
Grimes, K. D
Gilo, A
Haywood, O. T
Hammond. G S
liasseltoii, II. II
Haradon, G. W
Hale. A. T
llaskins, 1,
Hatch..!. E .....
Henderson. G. W....
Henry, J. M
Heath. X. C
Hill, Wm
Hill, Til ns
Hicks, M. D
Horn, Jos ,
Howard, C. J
Houston, O. A
Hoirel, II. T
Holmes, 1)
Howard. A. J...,
E
K
K
K
i:
I'
I
I)
I)
II
C
F
2d Battery
II
A..K
C
B
A
B
G
K
F
i:
K
Holden, H. K I
Hubbard, Horace II
Hubbard, Daniel 1st Battery
Hubbard. Horace I
Jenkins, Willia K
Johnson, ltiehard 1st Battery
Jones, Alonzo II
J oval, J. K !'
KelloKB. F. 1' K
Keeler, F. L U
Kelley, Edward H
Kiser, II. S C
Kimball, L. F K
Kidder. A. B A
Lara bee, Samuel...
Larkins, J. II
Lnrabee, Cluis
Lnmpsoii, Daniel..
La pier, Joseph
Leory, Joseph
Lemon, Auir
Lilley, Carlos
Liscomb. J. E
Lovelt. Joseph...
!!!!'.'.'.'.'."!!!!!!!!!'..o
K
K
D
1 Battery
8
8
7
7
7
7
8
7
8
7
7
8
8
7
7
8
it
8
7
7
8
8
7
8
8
8
7
8
7
8
8
7
8
8
7
7
Lomondv. Lewis I,
I, lint. l"l I'
M.ixev, . H "
Maxlinm, Orvin K
Martin, II. II i
Martin, C. C A
Maxeher
Marston, I. L
Merrill. M. 11 K
Mitchell, James II
Mitchell, S. B 1st Buttery
Mottitt. Henry K
Moreo, I). B , 11
Mont joinery, J. M K
Moshicr, T. C I
Monro, W. H I
Mullen, James
MeArtliur, "F.'S
McCartr, Hiram
McPaniels, Carlos....
McDonald, J. K.'...,
McEvery, (. W...
McGookin, H
Mclntiye. D. B
McKinney, John
McKpnzie, A
Norton, V'm ,
Xoyes, J. W
,oyeB,.lohn W
Oliver, David
Puttee, J . 1,
Parker, G. E
PnKe.Chancellor
I'uKa, Nf,'lson
Vniff, G. W
Piie, A. E
Packard, C. II..
Parent, Peter ,
Parkhurst, A. II
Pease, W. II....;....:,
. Peabody, Luther....:
Peters,. M. B ,
Berkley, Win
PearlFinn.....'...'
Phillips, H. O
Phillips. Jos
I'lulhritk. 1. V
I'dsi,, A. (" ,
Poor. G. H
Proctor, C. C
tiuimby, II. F
Quimhy, Win
Raymond, Geo
Hansom, B. II
Heed, A. M
ltimley, Ot to...
Hichardsoii, E
Bice, O. L
Itiley, Jauies
Itoach, II. V
ItUKff, X. B
Sanborn, L. O ,
Sanford, Dewey
Shepherd, 1). E
Shontell. F'd'k
Silsby, ('has
Siblby, Wm
Smith, G. W
Smith, C. A
Smith, Perley......
Spanldiiit?, C. X
Spaulding, A. L
Spraue, James.
Stevens. E. E
Stone, W. E
Sletdiens. E. II
Stephens, Araasa B
Co.
A
II
B
II
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G
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i;
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...Buttery
F
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..K
...Battery
D
II
E
II
II
I
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II
...It
Stocker, J. F....
Stults, Geo
Stoddard, .1. F
Stone, C. V
Sumner, Chus
Sullivan, John
Tnrbell, C. W
Thayer. J. E
Thompson, Leonard...
Titus, G. X
Tillotson, Curtis
Townsend, Micnjat...
TownBend, D. W
Turner, C. W
Walker, Geo
Ward, C. A. B
Warren, E.C
Washer, Benj
Wade, Joshua
Wullis, G. J
Ward, Win
Weller, V. II
Wells, Martin
Wellmaii, W. M
Welch, John
White, S. H
Whitney, J. O...
Whiteomb, G. E
Williams, Frank
Wilson, Elssnezer....
Wilson, Francis
Winchester, Orson
Wilder, S. D
Wilkins. Durand
Willey, Kensnlier
Woodbury, A. II
Woodbury, C. W
Woodward, H.
Woodward, G. B
Wood, A. J
Worden, F. N
Wood, Willurd
Wright, Eber
B
B
I
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..Batterv
K
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C
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ZZZT'b
G
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F
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B
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7
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7
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7
Our Boston Letter.
A noble amphitheatre whose outer
aisle measures more than four hun
dred feet ; a sharply descending floor
centering around the graceful chancel
rail; avast gallery almost as capiv
cious as the main floor, and which
swings clean around the building,
and from organ to organ again;
a superb organ towering above this
wilderness of orchestra chairs ami
forming a background for the speak
er's platform; a liberal platform with
out a pulpit such at a glance is tne
People's Methodist Episcopal Church
in the city of Boston. The famous
stained glass window in its front
probably as fine a piece of work as is
to be seen in America given in mt
moriam to Bishop Gilbert Haven by
his once fellow-clerks, Eben Jordan
and ex-Sheriff Clark, is itself worth a
visit to the church. It represents
Christ bearing his crosa through
the streets of Jerusalem. There are
two or three other noteworthy win
dows in the sacred edifice.
This is the most capacious Protest
ant Church in New England, nnd one
of the largest auditoriums in Boston.
Its full seating capacity is about
2,500. Yet so compact is the allot
ment of chairs, that tho speaker
seems to be within conversing dis
tance of the remotest hearer, as it
seemed to nie.
The building has a remarkable his
tory. Rev. J. W. Hamilton, V.
became known through Lnglisii
speaking Christendom by its con-
. - .i A.t.v viii . .
struction. .More man qf.'u,uuo wan
at one time raised fr it by ten-cent
pieces alone. Ten cents bought a
brick, laterally tne Liinstiau worm
contributed. Hundreds who renu
this will remember the red brick on
paper, and the heroic builder's circu
lar appeal. Such readers will be glad
to know that the largest fret? church
building in Boston, to which they
gave their mite, is now free from debt
at last. The property is well worth
.? :100,000 in the estimation of good
judges, nnd must soon enhance by
land vulue alone to half n million.
It is a Methodist Episcopal Church
the well-known brendtli ami
liberality of that branch of Christians
is here given, if possible, a new em
phasis. Its history connx-Is the Peo
ple's Church to lie cosmopolitan. It
stands lor Christ and humanity. It
is a church of the peoplefrompeakto
foundation, steadfast in creed, fer
vent in working purpose. A signifi
cant fact in connection ia that this
People's Church is the first to be call
ed bv that name. o Kiiuiiy uia
men tako to it. that the title was
at once adopted in many cities of
the United States. Several in Eng
land also bear it to-day.
During nine years of tremendous
labor Dr. Hamilton was in charge of
this unique work. Ihe incredulous
community awoke at last to wonder
and admire, and then to assist hin
labors to success. To him nnd to the
irracious lady, hia wife, who yielded
up her young life on its alters, the
reverent love oi tne city onereu nwu,
Rev. C. E. Davis, I). D., nnd Key
l(. Ii. Greene, 1. I)., in succeeding
pastorates eonductid the enterpris
to the goal of security freedom from
debt, lathe final struggle, so nil
portant did this pivotal point seem
to Ihcin, that nearly theeiitire board
of Bishops drew their pocket-books
tive hundred dollars apiece, and
Methodist laymen emulated them
A recent Sabbath HPent in this
church was exceedingly impressive
t O IUIA. M. a devoted band as
nembled for early prnyer-meetin
The service was held in one of tht
rooms of the ample chapel adjoining
tliPimiiii edifice. The spirit of the
meeting was fervent with old Meth
odist lire. .U 10.1. as we came out
thousands of people were thronging
yet
along the corridors ami entering tho
Vawt, cool auditorium. The wafa
nrp all free, nnd tx-oplo know it. No
one intrudes. Voluntary contribu
tions alone sustain the tremendoua
Christian activity carried on "here in
various ways. While it ia true that
the great middling cIushch predomi
nate, yet there nre the rich nnd the
poor.- Near me Hnt an ex-govemor
of Massachusetts who ia deeply inter
ested in this popular church. On a
previoua Sabbath the present gov
ernor of another New England State
was pointed out to me, while follow
ing him down the aisle was a huinb.o
woman, who must perforce bring her
almost infant boy in .her nriim it
she came nt oil. .Hundreds of young
men and young women made -an
easily perceptible majority of this
audience.
Situated nt the Junction of n croK-
town thoroughfare, Prkeley Street.
-M. l !. Iff (it.elicn if li" II, if
tnyrcgiou or wmtiti on oie Mile,
nnd the grent district of the thrifty
householder clasa on tho other; tin
Columbus Avenue, near the Provi
dence Station with ita tuburban
travel, in easy reach of the great
boarding-house district, tho building
ia particularly fortunate in location.
It is not three minutes walk from ita
doors to the Young Women's ( hrix
tian Association upon the east nnd
the Young Men's Christum Associa
tion upon the west.
It was now 10:30 o'clock. The
broad avenues are sending in the jmhi
ple yet. Signs of eagerness to sccuro
good seats are on all these faces. We
nro courteously provided with pro
grammes printed especially for the
Hervicea. The throng part a upstairs
some; hither and thither along these
fan-radiating many ninles, others. It
ia already a, mass of ix-oplo that
would crowd to repletion niowt
hurches. Still there ia room. Tho
grand organ a memorial gift of a
bereaved father for a noble son ia
breathing solemn notes that jar and
echo along the ample spaces, or pleud-
ng soltly with notes that nso high
towards the groined ceiling. The
problem of how to reach themusms
look around j-ou now ! A writer in
the Boston Home Journal recently
mt it well:
"You will find Ii era what, von wnnt lo till
your pews. Thesn people wish to rome lierr.
tut they do not wish to p-o then. I Ins in
ome. That is not. Make your rliim-h I heir
home, nnd they will rome many of them, or
f t how like tliem. J liey n r very Athenian
in necking something new. The claims of thin
preacher to attention nre such n to warm nt
he nssemblinaot Inrirenuiliene to henr liim.
He is in earnest. Ha hns something to my.
Ha says it in downright manner, simply.
clearly nnd strongly, lie is pictorial, lieia
a cultivated ifentiemnn who has a large vocabulary-out
of which he choiwun t lie worda
that will carry his meaning to the wnyfarrr.
lie has that high art of expression whsli
rhnnicterir.eii the article in the Nineteenth
Century, and which consists in nn nbcobils
avoidance of Mlf-ndiilntion, pretention, show
and rather in the exhibition of the subject in
hnnd in the most forcible English and jet in
un ornate woy.
I nm indebted to a friend who
watches ltoHton churcho dowdy for
tlielleraUl pen-pictures ol l'r. liny inn
when preaching at J reinont lctnpli)
ahull far lens fitted for nil tho tin
encctnol oratory than this JmndHniiio
church :
Last of all romea In the man who is to
lend this immense house of worship. A mnn
neither tall nor short, nn avernged-sized. well
knit man, with n small, compact head, dark
hair, partially shaven laee, iMissessing confi
dence in himself, hut assuming not king, tak
ing it all In as if ha were to the manner isim.
He continue wrapped in liis oven-oat : nods
to his deacons; snilTs t he air like a rnev-horse,
preparing for the start; with a serioua pur
pose and reverent spirit call the congrega
tion to their feet, while the chorus choir lend
the singing of the Doxology. In front of him
nn attendance that pneks the immense andi-
orium from floor to ceiling. e enn e the
prrncher'a eye k a llennd almost feel his heart
swell with emotion ns ha casts a glnnee over
he multitudinous throng, nnd thinks whether
his message ran tie better adapted to their
needs. One with any eonl anil imagination
cannot help being mo veil nt the sight. It
thrills 3011 through and through. Here ia
such an audience ns cannot be found elsew hera
in Boston, or in New England. Aa amlienea
winch cnrrie tho preacher, whether lie will or
not, beyond the lines of denominational teach
ing, and tills him with that purpose to broad
en hi instruction to the needs of tha univer
sal man."
There ia more of Methodist fire.
moreof the splendid ehx-utienary art
of n confessedly well equipped voice,
decidedly more of tho thrilling result
of address than Mr. Haynes ever at
tained in Tremont Temple or SIiiMic
Hall, "he man lias grown, to lie
sure, but mere is somciniug more
than mere mental or spiritual prowt h.
His heart is at home, evidently.
among Methodists. He has gained
immensely by thechnngo to this more
compact auditorium. I nmtold now
na never is-fore, hia ministry ia attend
ed bv students to study hia mcthoda
of address. Young ministers ought
to hear him rend alValm or a hymn.
The sermon we heard was on "How
to Believe in God." Such pictures,
drawn until they lived on the im
ngined canvass; such pathos at
times; such high and healthful excite
ment ; such stillness 111 the room!
Jordan, Peeks, Goldwnithe, Mc-
Closkev, are well deserving of their
reputation. Tho chorus; of a largo
number of voices leads the chining
hymn. Rev. Mr. Gunnison, assistant
pastor, adds a notice or two, and
gracefully dismisses thecongregntion.
. . ,f.Al .'!. 1.
Ir. Jiaynes naa just saui : - iiim in
the Strangers' Church. I shall 1st
honored if vimtors will come totlm
hancel rail and shake hands with
me. vie loin 1 no iins-ession in.ii
takea thia greeting. It ia a world
wide visitation. Men from all parts
of the country attend nnd give u
word of greeting, mnnv of them evi
dently not of the Methodist Church,
but cordially in sympathy with thia
cosmopolitan service. The Sunday
school succeeds, and then in the after
noon there nre various inisnionnry
endeavors connected with the church.
The evening service ia much o rcix'tt-
tion of the morning, except, if possi
ble, rather more popular, in that
large nuinliera of exceedingly young
jxHiple fill thHO ample spaces. A
grand opportunity to do good, and
a grand cttort ior me attainiuennu
the fullness of tho opportunity.
Tha United btatea Navy.
Only about 23 l"nited States ships,
exclusive of the revenue cutters ami
the training squadron, are now in
commisioii, but it ia estimated that
five years hence there will lx 41
shipsavnUable for active service, nnd
tliat ol these only three or four will
m of the antiquated tyN-M that
now make up the bulk of the navy.
Before that time arrives, however,
there will lx a vat th.nige in the
make-up of vniionapiHdi oiis. The
Asiatic squadron in pnrticnl.tr will
have got itself a new outht. Several
of the vessels on that Million have
been kept there for years past chiefly
Im-cuuso they were nntit for tho
voyage home across the Pacific.
mom - .
The cleansing, nntiseptic nnd lienlingqnnli
tics of lr. Safe's I uturrli llciiu.lv me tm
equalled

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