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News and citizen. [volume] (Morrisville, Vt. ;) 1881-current, November 21, 1900, Image 2

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NEWS AND CITIZEN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER at, 1900.
2
LOCAL N EWS.
MORRISVILLE.
The MorrieviUe of to-day may be
larger in the future. Watch out for
it. There is no chII for graveyard
census returns here.
Pretty snug winter weather Satur
day morning with the mercury hug
ging pretty close to about three de
' grees below the zero mark.
While believing in newspaper ad
vertising, H. J. Dwinell has invested
in the "Home Formulary," giving
household receipts to be putupat hiH
store. Ask to see one and take it
home with you.
Mrs. Lucv Smith, who has been
cook at The Randall for many
months, has gone to Hardwick to
start a boarding bouse. Mrs. Smith
has quite a large family to provide
for, and the many friends here trust
her venture up at the Granite City
may prove a success. Those who pat
ronize her will soon find out her cul
inary capabilities.
Letter to C. M. Boynton & Sons.
MorrisrHle, Tt.
Dear Sirs : There are several ways
of cheating in milk. An old-fashioned
way is to water it. Nobody waters
it now. A better way is to take out
the cream rich milk with the cream
taken out is as good as poor milk
with its cream all in.
But we needn't go into the particu
lars. You don't rob your milk and your
customers.
Paint is as easy as milk to cheat
with. Good paint ia as rare as good
milk ; for human nature is much the
same in milk men and paint men.
You are just and true with your
milk; so are we with our paint. De
voe lead and zinc is twice as good as
good as pure white lead; lasts twice
as long. There's twice as much but
ter in it. Yours truly,
5 F..W. Deove & Co.
Flint Plumley.
The marriage of Theodora L.,
daughter of Hon. and Mrs. Frank
Plumley of Northfield, to the Rev.
Homer A. Flint of Pittsburg, Pa., oc
curred in Mary's church Wednesday
morning at eight o'clock, only rela
tives and a few close friends of the
contracting parties being present.
The maid of honor was Miss Minnie
Hogan of St. Albans, and best man
was George M. Hogan of that city.
The full Episcopal marriage ceremony
was performed, followed by celebra
tion of the Holy Communion, which
the bride and groom alone received.
The ushers were Chas. A. Plumley,
brother of the bride, and J. W. Flint
of Williamstown, brother of the
groom. The young couple hit on
the night express for their future
home in Pittsburgh, where Mr. Flint
has charge of a parish.
Spread Uke Wildfire.
When things are "the best" they
become "the best selling." Abraham
Hare, a leading druggist of Bellville,
O., writes: ''Electric Bitters are the
best selling bitters I have bandied in
20 years. You know why ? Most dis
eases begin in disorders of stomach,
liver, kidneys, bowels, blood and
nerves. Electric Bitters tones up the
stomach, regulates liver, kidneys and
bowels, purities the blood, strength
ens the nerves, hencecures multitudes
of maladies. It builds up the entire
system, Pute new life and vigor into
any weak, sickly, rundown man or
woman. Price 50 cents. Sold by
H. J. Dwinell, Druggist.
One-fourth of the inhabitants of
the world die before they reach the
seventh year, one-half before their
seventeenth year.
Millions Given Away.
It is certainly gratifying to the
public to know of one concern which
is not afraid to be generous. The
proprietors of Dr. King's New Discov
ery for Consumption, Coughe, and
Colds, have given away over ten mill
ion trial bottles and have the satis
faction of knowing it has cured thou
sands of hopeless cases. Asthma,
Bronchitis, La Grippe and all Throat,
Chest and Lung diseases are surely
cured by it. Call on U. J. Dwinell,
Druggist, and get a free trial bottle.
Regular size 50c and $ 1.00. Every
bottle guaranteed.
We hate ho right to meddle with
other men's conductto their own
master must they give account, BUre
ly not to us. ,
Great Luck of au Editor.
"For two years all efforts to cure
Eczema ii the palms of my hands
failed," writes Editor H. N. Lester of
Syracuse, Kansas, "then I was whol
ly cured by Bucklen's Arnica Salve."
It's the world's best for Eruptions,
Sores and all skindiseases. Only 25c
at II. J. Dwinell's.
We cannot safely ignore any criti
cism that we may hear of ourselves
or our work.
That Throbbing Headache.
Would quickly leave you, if you
used Dr. King's New Life Pills. Thou
sands of sufferers have proved their
matchless merit for Sick and Nervous
Headaches. They make pure blood
nnd hnild ud vour health. Onlv 25
cents and money back if not cured.
Sold by 11. J. Dwinell, Druggist.
As the salt savors the' broth, so
does labor give relish to pleasure
Thit nipnntur in on every box of the genuine
Laxative uromoQuinine Tabieu
the remedy that ciurea cold In one day
Look
Before
You
Leap,
If a dealer attempts to sell
you a. substitute when you
ask for Hood's Sarszparilla,
his only object is to make
more profit on the substitute, which is
always inferior And unsatisfactory. There
fore be sure to get Hoof s.
Scrofula "Forbears I hid scrofuU
sores on my back, I took many medicines
'without Avail and thought J could not be
cured. Then Ibeoxn taking Hood' s Sar
saparilla and it entirely cured me." My
health is now perfect. I am a trained
nurse, and recommend Hood' s for all blood
diseases." J. D. Torrey, 46 W. Main
Street, Fredonia, N. Y.
Hood's Pills eurfl Itver ills; thenon-lrrltattngand
only cathartic to take with Hood's SarsapariHa.
THE MODERN FABLE.
(Chicago News )
Once upon a time t here wan a Lone
ly and Deserving Girl named Clara,
who was gettiDg so near thirty that
she didn't want to talk about it. She
traveled with the thoroughbreds and
was always among those present ; so
it was hard to understand why she
hadn't married. Ocher gills notes
good looking or accomplished bad
been grabbed off when ttuy were buds.
Already some ot them were beginning
to act as chaperons for Clara. They
were keeping tab on Clara's age, too,
and begun to think that she would
land on the bargain counter and have
to be satisfied with a widower who
wore a toupee and dved his eye
brows. Clara was something of a mind
reader. She knew that the friends of
her youth were predicting a hard fin
ish for her, so she decided to fool
them. And she knpw that it behoov
ed her to catch on belore the children
started in to call her auntie.
Now it is not to be inferred that
Clara was what the underwriters call
a bad risk. She never had been a
drug on the market. When she went
to a hop she didn't have to wait for
ladies' choice in order to swing into
the mezy. In fact, she had been en
gaged now and thenftafst for prac
tice, and she had received offers from
Eome of the hold-over bachelors who
went around proposing from force of
habit. But Clara was not out for
any man who had been turned down
elsewhere. She wanted the right kind
and slie was going to do the picking
herself.
Having made an inventory of the
possibilities, she selected the treasur
er of the shoe factory and decided
that she could love him without
straining herself. He was about her
own age and was almost as good
looking as a Gibson man, and had
Al prospects. It would be no easy
job to land him, however, because the
competition was very keen and he
was wary, trying to be a kind friend
to every girl he knew, but playing no
favorites. He kept the parents guess
ing. The treasurer of the shoe facto
ry was what any society paper would
can a great eaten.
Clara got busy with herself and
hatched a scheme. When all the
smart set got ready to pike away for
the heated term, Clara surprised her
friend by guessing she would remain
nt'home. It was the very thing to
do, because all the social head-liners
who could command the price were
supposed to flirt off to a summer ho
tel and loiter on the pine veranda and
try to think they were recuperating.
Clara told her mother to go, as us
ual, but she would stay at home and
be a companion to poor, lonesome
papa. So all the women went iff to
the resorts with their cameras and
talcum powder and witch hazel and
Clara was left in town with the men.
It is a traditional fact that there is
no social lifrf in town during the dog
days. But there is nothing to pre
vent a bright girl from starting some
thing. That is what Clara did.
She stocked up the refrigerator and
bung a hammock on thelawn with a
few easy chairs around it, The young
men marooned In town heard of the
good thing and no one had to tear
tLeir garments to induce them to
come. They arrived at the rate of
from seven to twelve anight and dip
ped into papa s cigars and the liquid
nourishment, regardless. Although
Clara had remained in town to act as
companion to papa, it was noticed
that when she had all the company
in the evening papa either had been
chloroformed and put to bed or else
he had his orders to stay under
cover.
Clara did not send for the treasurer
of the shoe factory. She knew better
than to go out alter her prey. She
allowed him to find his way to the
house with the others. When became
she did not chide him for failing to
make bis party call: neither did she
rush toward him with a low cry of
iov. thereby tipping her hand. She
knew that the treasurer of the shoe
factory was next to all those board
ing school tactics and could not be
handled by the methods that go with
the college students. Clara had en
joyed about ten yeurs' experience in
handling the creatures and she had
learned to labor and to wait. She
simply led him into the circle and
took his order nnd allowed him to sit
there in the gloaming and observe
how popular she was. All the men
were scrapping to see which would be
next tasit in the hammock with her.
44
It. looked for awhile as though Clara
would have to give o it checks the
6ime as in a barbershop. Late that
night when the men walked home
ward together they remarked thut
Clara was a warm hostess.
Nxt evening the treasurer of the
shoe factory was back on the lawn.
So were all tLe others. They said
there was no beating a place where
yen could play shirt waist man un
der the trees and have a fairy queen
in white come and push cold drinks
at you and not have to sign any tick
et. Thpy com postd flattering songs
about Clara and every time she mov
ed there was a man right there with
a sofa cushion to help her to be com
fortable. In the meantime the othergirls out
the summer resorts were doing the
best they could with these high school
cadets, wearing tidies around their
hats, who would rather go out in a
ca t boat and get their arms tanned
than to remain on shore and win the
hontt love of an American girl, with
a string to it.
Clara's work about this time was
ever so glossy. She rjegan by asking
the treasurer of the shoe factory to
come with her to the refrigerator to
get out some more imported ginser
ale. All the men volunteered to help
and two or three wanted to tag
along, but Clara drove them back.
They were gone a long time because
the treasurer had to draw all the
corks, and they fussed around to
gether in the pantry fixing upalunch
for the boys. Clara told him how
strong and handy he was, until he
felt an increase in chest measurement.
On successiye evenings she had the
treasurer supervise all the ariange
ments. The hired girl had every eve
ening out, because it was so much
more jolly to go out and run the
place yourself. In less than a week
the treasurer was giving orders round
the house. Every evening she would
get him back to the kitchen and tie
an apron around him and ask what
she should do nexT. She madbim
out to be the only one who could be
trusted. The others were company
but he was one of the family. And
although he was being worked like
creamery butter he never suspected
it.
He" game was to domesticate him
in advance and let him have a fore
taste ot wnat it is to be boss of your
own house except as to the billsr The
pantry was full of home delicacies
euch as he couldn't get at the hotel,
and the service is the best ever. Clara
was right at his elbow with a willing
smile.
It didn't take him long to realize
that he was missing a lot by remain
ing single. He wondered why he had
been so slow in getting onto Clara's
good point. Also he wondered if it
was any open and shut certainty
when a dcz-n other men, some of them
younger and more gallus, were at
her in full cry. -
Clara bad pulled him in,strunga
hung over the side of the boat.
Of course, if all tha other girls had
bten in town, they would have turn
bled long before it ran into a certain
ty and probably they would have
formed a V and rushed in to break up
the play. But the other girls were
far away with the old men and the
seminary striplings. Clara had an
open field with no need of any inter
fering or blocking, and if she fell
down it was her own fault. Besides
she had all these other admirers set
out as decoys to prove that if he did
n't, somebody else might.
The treasurer of the shoe factory
got a large rally on himself and she
had to give in and make a promise.
He loves to tell callers how he pro
posed to his wife in the kitchen and
he doesn't know to this day that she
was expecting it.
Moral : As soon as he begins to
frequent the back rooms of the house
measure him lor the harness.
Record Breaking Tall Men.
Two of the talles men of Vermont,
if not of all New Eigland, are resi
dents, of Bellows Falls. They are
brothers. Tallness is a family char
acteristic, inherited by Fred R. and
Allie It, Smith. Their mother is of
English descent, is over G feet tall and j
weighs 200 pounds, ller husband is
of ordinary height and weight, bub
the family of four tip the scales at
815 pounds, with a combined height
of 2G feet and 2 inches. Fred R.
Smith, the oldest of the three eons, is
24 years old, weighs 200 pounds, and
is 6 feet and ten inches tall.- His up
ward reach is 8 feet 8 inches, whilo
his arm stretch is G ft et 11 inches.
Allie R. Smith, the youngest brother,
is a perfect physical specimen of man
hood. Perfectly proportioned, ne
makes a striking picture on thestreet.
He is 19 years old, 0 feet 8 inches
tall and weighs 225 pounds. He can
reach 8 feet 4 inches, and, his chest
measure is 39 inches. He reached the
G feet mark when 15 years old and
has grown rapidly for the past year.
Stops th.o Cousft ftai works off ti.0
COM.
Laxatire BromoQuinine Tablet cure a
cold in one day. No t'ur, fJo Pay. Price 23
cedtn.
There are 141 theological schools
In the United States, 52 law schools,
92 regular medical schools, 9 eclectic
medical schools and 14 homeopathic.
TO CTOE A COLD I1T ONE SAT
Take Laxative Bromo-Qiiinine TuMets. All
(IniiririKU refund the money if it tnilH to onro.
K. W. Grove' signature lit on each box. 'Jon.
Just as fast as one low desire gives
place to a high one, one mean grati
fication is forgotten in a noble pleas,
ure.
Bean the ? IhB Kind You Have Always BougH
PI
SONS OF REVOLUTION.
Annual Meeting of Vermont Society.
The annual mpetingof the Vermont
Society of the Sons of the American
Revolution at Montpelier last week,
was called to order by the Vice-President,
Geu. Julius J. E-ttey .f Brattle-
boro. lh matter of marking the
graves of Revolutionary soldiers was
considered and a committee wuh ap
pointed to confer with the D.uiibters
of the Revolution in regard to this
matter. These officers were elected:
President, G n. Julius J. Est.ev; Yiet
President, Hon. Fletcher D. Proctor
of Proctor; Secretry.Col.C. S.Forbes
of St. Albans; Treasurer, Tlarenco L.
Smith of Burlington ; Reuintrar, Hen
ry L. St'll-on of Benpinston; Histo
rian, Hon. G. G Benedict ot Burling
ton; Chaplain, Rev. M. L Severance
of Bennington ; Board of Managers,
Hon. Chas. Dewey of Montpelier, ex
Gov. Carroll S. Page of Hyde Park,
Hon. W. H. DuBoisof Randolph, Col.
F. S Sr.ranahtin of St. Albans, Col.
T. C. Fletcher ot St. Johnsbury Wal
ter II. Crockett of Burlington, Clem
ent H Cone of Bennington, H. P. Mc
Clary of Windsor; delegates to the
national convention, Gen. J. J. Estey,
ex otflcio, Col. W. Seward Webb of
Sht lourne, Col. R. J. Kimball of Ran
dolph, Gen. J. G. McCullough of Ben
nington, Albert W. Ferrin of Mont
pelier. The question of publishing a
year book ua favored by all present.
The President, Vice-Pieiident, Secre
tary and Treasurer were constituted
a committee to publish a year book,
or if that should seem impracticable,
to print a roster.
Fish and Game League Meeting.
The meeting and banquet of the
Vermont Fish and Game League at
Montpelier, last tveuing, was a most
successtul aff iir. The members were
enthusiastic, the supper was gamy
and the speeches were bright and wit
ty. At a business meeting 55 new
members were admitted and the fol
lowing officers elected : President, J.
W. Titcomb, St. Johnsbury ; Secreta
ry, E. T. Bradley, Swanton; Treasur
er, Chas. t. Lowe. Montpelier; Vim
Presidents, W. R. Peak of Bristol, N
W. Fisk of Isle La Motte.E. C. Smith
of St. Albans, T. N. Vail of Lyndon,
Dr. W. Seward Webb of Shelburne,
Senator Redfield Proctor of Proctor,
Gen. J. J. Edtey of Brattleboro and
O. E. Luce of Stowe; Executive Com
mittee, T. M. Chapman, Middlebury,
E. W. Bartlett, East Dorset, T. It.
Stiles, St. Johnsbury, F. H. Wells,
Burlington, P. N. Dale, Island Pond,
H. J. Rublee, Montgomery. Geo. W.
Squire, South Hero, H.G.Thomas,
Stowe, Horace W. Bailey, Newbury,
S. A. Brady, Newport, Ira R. Allen,
tair Uaven, L. Bart Cross, Montpel
ier, F. W. Childs, Brattleboro, J. E.
Pollard, Chester; Membership Com
mittee, M. C. Berry, Burlington, Geo.
C. Fisher, Lyndonville, L. S. Norton,
Bennington. Proper resolutions on
the death of Ron land E. Robinson
were adopted. The banquet was serv
ed at the Pavilion shortly after nine
o'clock. The hall was completely fill
ed. After an hour at the tables Pres
ident Titcomb gaveaten minute talk
on fish culture. He then introduced
as to toastmaster, J. A. DeBoer. The
speakers were : J. G. McCullough, Ben
nington, R. W. Hulburd, Hyde Park,
frank L. Greene, Sb. Albans, W. G.
Davis, chief of the meteorological bu
reau of the Argentine Republic andC,
C. Gilmore of Swanton.
Why Zinc?
White lead chalks off ZincpreventH it. De
oes lead and line, ground together, wears
twice as long as lead and oil.
During the last 10 years more than
$10,000,000 has been expended in
the United States in the maintenance
of agricultural experiment stations,
$7,000,000 of which has come from
the federal government.
"I owe my whole life to Burdock Blood Bit
ters, bcrofulous sores covered my whole body,
I seemed beyond cure. B. B, B. has made me
a perfectly well woman," Mrs. Chas. Hutton,
Herville, Midi.
The experiment station has con
ciuoed tnat nax grown for seed in
Minnesota is identical with Russian
flax, and probably equally as good
a? that imported from Europe at a
high price.
You
May
Need
For
Cuts
Burns
Bruises
Cramps
Diarrhoea
All Bowel
Complaints
It !i tare, safe and quick remedy,
There's ONLY ONE
PaitvKiUer
Perry Davis'.
i Two size, 8lc. ami 50c.
l'AHIS EXPOSITION OF 1!W0.
Gold Mcdnl Award fur Superiority was mnde
to tho
WW
StOffTHAND&TEUGffAPHY.
mnt like others, hut hotter. If you wish to so
cure the heat ailvantuprci bo suro to Rtlcnd this
uiioi lor Institution. or cntnlOKiie Sililrcss,
CAKNEix llorr, Albany, N. Y,
FIRE SALE. .
We have a good many articles
fire and those which we did not
now offer for sale
At a Very
Our space does not allow us
the prices on them, but we have
Books of all kinds, Stationery,
Hot Water Bottles, Pocket
Books, etc., etc.,
to show you in this sale.
HALL k CHENEY,
PHARMACISTS,
Brick Block, Portland Street, MoiriSTTille, TTexaOat,.
for your Thanksgiving Dinner. Why should you not dress well also ?
Your feet will play a very important part in your appearance, for they are
always visible and sticking out somewhere.
SEE OUR LINE OF FOOTWEAR!
Ladies and Misses, Gentlemen, Boys, Girls, Children and Infants can
be rightly, handsomely and reasonably shod here, with the best of Shoes,
and every customer feel in duty bound to Give Thanks for the privilege of
obtaining such Splendid Footwear for so little money.
FOR THANKSGIVING-
we will have Celery, Cranberries, Malaga Grapes, Bananas, Oranges, New
Figs and Raisins, Mixed Nuts and Sweet Potatoes.
DON'T FORGET
to buy some Sterling Java Coffee, as
such occasions.
M. A. STONE & CO.,
MORRISVILLE, VT.
About Fur
, The season has arrived when any man who has business
which keeps him out of doors cannot afford to be without a Fur Coat
of some description. We have never had so large an assortment of
first class coats as we are showing this fall. Our assortment com
prises Goat, Dog, Calf, Wombat, Bulgarian
s Lamb, and Coon, -
in all the different grades. We have had considerable call for
and have put a few in stock and shall be glad to have them inspect
ed. If you have the least idea of buying, we shall be more than
glad to show our stock, and can show the best coats for the money
ever shown in this section.
0. M. WATERMAN.
Store in The Randall,
MORRISVILLE, Vermont.
which were damaged in our recent
consider worthless and destroy, we
Low Price.
to quote the different articles and
such articles as
EXPECTS TO BE
WELL DRESSED
a cup of Good coffee helps out on
Coats !

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