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The southern news. [volume] (Asheville, N.C.) 1936-19??, February 27, 1943, Image 2

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1943
£ Whe M
Published Every Friday by
THE SOUTHERN NEWS COMPANY
EUGENE SMITH,
P resident-Publisher
PHONE 7660
Home Office:
BOX 4«4 121 SOUTHSIDE AVENUE ASHEVILLE, N. C.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
1 Mouth ( .24
3 Months .•©
6 Months 1.00
1 Year 1.00
Entered as second class matter November 25, 1030, at the poet
office at Asheville, North Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1370
POLL TAX
Our country is today engaged in a war between a free
and slave world. A war in which the prerequisite for vic
tory isthat we move forward now to full freedom for the
common man. If we win, we must grant to every citizen
the rights inherent in Democracy. Today in America, six
million Negro citizens and six million White citizens in
the eight southern states are deprived of the right to vote
by the requirement of the poll tax, a requirement which
disfranchises them solely because of their poverty. We in
North Carolina do have a poll tax law. We also understand
that Tennessee has a law pending in its legislature to
repeal the poll tax. If 42 states can carry this part of
democracy why not the eight state rid themselves of this
evil law and grant freedom to these ten million people.
POST-WAR PEACE
Nearly every city is planning a post war peace. The
President of the United States has appointed a committee
to work out this peace. The golden rule is the one rule
that if sincerely followed could bring peace to all the world.
Nation would no longer war against nation, nor people
against people, class against class, race against race, creed
against creed.
Nations for many years have overlooked the golden
rule. There is no law that is greater than this law. Why
not the leaders of this great nation remind the people of
the golden rule.
MR. LINCOLN
By Ruth Taylor
In this, our month of heroes, we do honor to those
who did so much for us and for this country. Across these
days lies the shadow of the Great Emancipator—just as the
shadow of the great statue lies across the snowj’ marble
of the Lincoln Memorial.
We honor him for his greatness—for the courage it
took to do the things he did; for the bravery of his fight up
wards; for his great sympathy and broad vision. We listen
reverently to the great words of his greatest address which
still fall) fall across the aisles Os time, as fresh as. on that
day a tGettysburg when they were first delivered.
But there is more for which we should honor Mr. Lin
coln. And we say Mr. Lincoln—not the President, or even
Abraham Lincoln, which is a title in itself.
Let us not talk about the great things he did—orators
all over the land will speaf of them on February twelfth.
Let us rather talk of the man, Mr. Lincoln, who went through
the same things all of us go through and who stumbled and
tell just as often—but who picked himself up each aime and
went right on.
Let us remember the gangling farm boy, laughed at
by those of his own age and condescendingly pitied by those
who were older. Let us remember the man who was called
shiftless, who made a failure of shopkeeping, and whom
no one thought would amount to anything. Let us remember
not just the cases he won in his law practice, but the cases
he lost, and the hard time he had to make ends meet, even
as you and I.
Let us remember the Mr. Lincoln who came into Wash
ington for his first inaugural—not the man hated by his
opponents, but the man pitied by his friends, and looked
down upon by his own party, for the things he had yet
to learn. Let us remember the lonely Commander-in-Chief,
making mistakes and admitting them, picking himself up
after every fall and going right on again trying to do his
part to bring about that in which he believed—a union of
free men.
It is that Mr. Lincoln I admire most. It is that Mr.
Lincoln of whom I think when days are dark. The lesson
of his life is even greater than the lesson of his words. It
is not too big for any of us to encompass. It is the steady,
day in and out fight against discouragement, against mis
fortune, against failure. It is the resolute clinging to an
ideal —an ideal based on good for others not for oneself
alone. Mr. Lincoln neither feared nor was faint hearted
and at last “by faith he subdued Kingdoms and wrought
righteousness.” Let us do honor to the humaneness of Mr.
Lincoln.
“EPITATH”
By Lance Allen Lynch
(Dedicated to the late Dr. George Carver)
In humble mien, the ways of earth he trod,
A paragon of greatness bom of God.
But invested in a holy incense breath,
His soul at last essayed the door of Death—
And entering into Heaven’s own acclaim,
It left behind a good and honored name,
For the diptych in the gilded hall of fame.
The world concedes that he was truly great,—
And unknown is he, who’d scorn to emulate
His life because of racial lineage—
This scientist; this Negro of the age.
Up from the dark of ante bellum days;
Up through the brume of life”s abandoned ways,
THE SOUTHERN NEWS
WHICH IS IT DOING?
'The rltw
i
WET"
-The NEW
Released b» Keystone Features. Inc.
He forged ahead incentively to blaze
A path that lead to an undiscovered field
Os science which was rife with natural yield.
With unity of purpose fixed in mind,
He left the world of pleasure far behind.
Does one forget the wonders he achieved?
Or the blessings which mankind therefrom received?
Behold the man of strength and tolerance;
This overlord of every circumstance—
Whose heart admitted of no arrogance,
But chose the modest modejor its romance.
How proud should be the families ’of his race,
To boast a member risen to the' place
Os honor and renown amiSst this mass
Os mortals who were loath to see him pass.
America, inscribe on marble stones,
His epitath in sweet poetic tones—
-0 Clio, come record his worthy deeds,
For Earth with all her races and her creeds.
0 Fates who know the lay of every clime,
Tread lightly o’er these certain sands of time,
Where fottprints lead to the end of a life sublime.
Remember him, 0 seed of noble birth;
Forget him not, the ways of earth he trod,
A paragon of greatness born of God.
Why worry over imaginary troubles when you could
be reveling in imaginary happiness.
Uncle Mose: “Boss say dis gwinner be a hard ye’r.
Shucks! Dat’s all de kin’ I ebber seen.”
—l —| — —|—
Justice is said to be blind, but it sometimes gives
cause to suspect that it is just pretending.
Simple Susie says women have shown their ability to
make concessions in their dress to both style and necessity.
They have given up the hoopskirts, bustles, chemises, petti
coats, girdles, garters and stockings and are ready to make
further concessions when needed.
IHVCNTORYOr
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M»r,T tNA «£. / ‘V /Ytyl K /
SWITCHBOARD NATALIC F. /j /I
OPSSATORS kflr \// DONALDSON/ //
ILL 'first OFFICER skwtawgs zf
" - FRANCES C ALEXANDER
" OF TOLEDO. O-
WAACS RELIEVE SOLDIERS FOR COMBAT
| FORT HUACHUCA, ARIZONA |
NEWS
BRIEFS
ALIENS MAY WORK
IN WAR PRODUCTION
WASHINGTON ln response
to numerous inquiries and com
plaints, the Department of Justice
Feb. 18 reminded employers that
no legal barriers exist to prevent
the employment of aliens in war
production, except in the case of
a few highly-confldentlal projects.
CAIJS UPON G. O. P.
WOMEN TO FORMULATE
POST-WAR PROGRAM
NEW YORK, Feb. 18 A call
to Republican women to help
formulate a postwar program
“based upon the single idea of
peace for our country in the fu
ture regardless of the interest of
any particular group or enter
prise,” featured an address by
Thomas J. Curran, New York
Secretary of State, before the
School of Politics of the Wo
men’s National Republican Club
here today.
DOUGHBOY’S MONEY
BOON TO CASABLANCA
CASABLANCA The Ameri
can fighting man, always a free
spender, has restored this Moroc
can “Little Paris” to a serablence
of its former prosperity.
Not since before war began has
so much money bowed through
the monetary channels of Casa
blanca, and Uncle Sam’s many
nephews in this springboard of
war are the economists pumping
the do-re-mi into Casablanca's
business.
WARNS CANADA
OF IjONG WAR
OTTAWA, Ont., Feb. 19—Prime
Minister Mackenzie King main
tained today that victory lies “a
very considerable time in the fu
ture” and that the war cannot
be won this year and possibly not
by next year.
CURTAIL COAL
USE IN ARMY
ATLANTA, Ga. As a move
to co-operate in the Eastern fuel
shortage situation, coal shipments
to Army posts and camps in the
seven Southeastern States have
been curtailed to a point not to
exceed consumption, the Quarter
master Branch, Fourth Service
Command, revealed.
The announcement said the
curtailed shipments were in step
with the general policy adopted
in other service commands to
make the available coal supply go
as far as possible.
GIRL SCOUTS
AID WAR WORK
AKRON, Ohio Too young to
follow their mothers and older
sisters into defense factories, 28
members of the Girl Scout Troopl
of St. John’s Church chose the
next best thing.
Releasing grown-ups for wad
work, 15 of the girls spent 4,601)1
hours doing housework.
Six cared for children while!
their parents were on the asseml
bly line, for a total of 1,310 hours!
In 3,600 hours six girls di<l
kitchen chores ,and one girl spenl
1,000 hours as a farm assistant. I
PATRONIZE ADVERTISER* I
W™* [ SUNDAY
btltmational | SCHOOL
<-LESSON*
By HAROLD L. LUNDQUIST, D. D.
Ot The Moody Bible Institute ot Chicago.
(Released by Western Newspaper Union.)
Lesson for February 28
Lesson subjects and Scripture texts se
lected and copyrighted by International
Council of Religious Education; used by
permission.
JESUS RESTORES LAZARUS
TO LIFE
LESSON TEXT—John 11:32-33. 33-44.
GOLDEN TEXT—“I am the resurrec
tion. end the life."—John 11:25.
Suffering, sorrow and bereave
ment are so common in our day that
this lesson is peculiarly appropriate.
Life, even to the Christian, finds its
full measure of things which hurt
and grieve. Many ask: "Why must
I, a follower of Christ, bear such
burdens?”
The answer is, that while the be
liever is not “of the world,” he is
“In the world,” and here he must
meet the problems of life, including
the evils to which the flesh is heir
because of sin. The fact that Jesus
is our Friend and our Saviour does
not exempt us from human sorrow,
but It does assure us of the needed
grace to bear the trial and makes
us ready to trust Him even in life’s
darkest hour.
Lazarus, the friend of Jesus, was
sick. The home in which Jesus had
found rest and fellowship was in
deep trouble. Jesus was no longer in
Judea. In haste, word was sent to
Him of His friend’s illness. But He
did not come.
Why does He delay? Such is the
heart-cry of thousands today who
call on Him in their hour of trouble.
The purposes of God we cannot fully
understand. We need only to trust
Him and abide His time.
Notice that His failure to respond
at once to the message of Lazarus’
sisters did not mean that He had
deserted them (John 11:4-6). Nor
did it mean that He had denied them
His help (v. 7).
Above all, note that He came. He
always does. Jesus has never failed
any child of His. The time and the
manner of His answer to our prayer*
may not conform to our opinion of
what should have been done; but
let us remember that we know only
In part. He knows all. Let us trust
Him. Job, in his darkest hour, said:
“Though he slay me, yet will I trust
in him” (Job 13:15).
The steps from sorrow to victori
ous joy in this story are three in
number.
I. Death and Tear* (vv. 32-25).
By the time Jesus came, Lazarus
was deed and his family and friend*
could only weep a* they said: “If
'> thou hadst been her*—” Try as we
may to temper it* cruel blow, the
fact remain* that death is the enemy
of man. It came into the world a*
the result of sin (Rom. 5:12), and
only in Christ Is It “swallowed up
in victory" (I Cor. 15:54). Until
the glorious day of Christ’s return
ing, when the redemption of the
body will be complete (Rom. 8:23),
death will continue to bring sorrow
to the heart and tears to the eyes.
But let u* not fail to notice that
as th* friend* of Jesus, w* do not
sorrow alone. “Jesus wept” (v. 35)
with Martha and Mary. We know
that He weep* with u* in our trying
hour. He Is the “friend that stick
eth closer than a brother.” He is
the one who gives grace to meet
the deepest sorrow, and to bear it
with grace because of His tender
fellowship.
11. Faith and Hope (vv. 38-40).
“If thou wouldest believe, thou
shouldest see the glory of God,"
said Jesus to Martha. She must
look beyond the evident tact of the
deadness ot her brother and see
God'| glory in his resurrection.
Thus faith assures us that those who
believe in Christ have more than
the comfort of His sympathizing
presence—they have a sure hope
(read I Thess. 4:14-18).
Sorrow and unbelief would becloud
our faith and thus rob us of our
hope. Martha needed to have her
faith stimulated by the gracious
words of the Lord; and then
she triumphantly put her hope in
Him, the Christ of God. Once we
recognize Him as God, we have no
hesitation in believing in His mirac
ulous power.
111. Christ and Resurrection (vv.
41-44).
Majestic and authoritative are the
words of Christ, "I am the resur
rection and the life" (v. 25). He it
was who gave life, for was He not
“in the beginning with God”? And
THE WORD OF GOD
For God so loved the world that
He gave His only begotten son
that whosoever believeth on Him
would not perish but have ever
lasting life. (John 3:16)
F.D.R. PLANS
TO FIGHT FOR
PLANAGENCY
WASHINGTON President
Roosevelt will use the fullest in
fluence of the Administration to
prevent Congress from nullifying
any of the executive agencies
dealing with postwar planning.
The President is not seeking any
disputes with Congress he can
avoid, but when it comes to post
war planning, both international
and domestic, he is prepared to
itake on whatever controversy ma>
• be necessary.
Mr. Roosevelt

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