OCR Interpretation


Pierre weekly free press. (Pierre, S.D.) 1889-19??, April 27, 1905, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn98062890/1905-04-27/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

I
HSSSKjvv
p- b_
S'
VOL XXL
My Stock
Is Always
Brandies and Fine Wines
Table
$
*w
a i-i *1
NEAT
GLEAN
',£' ^all,
hfcp
B. D. DICKEY,
a in
Staple and Fancy Groceries
WOr'K8
Celebrated Line of Crackers.
CAR LOAD
OF
Barb Wire
AND
Nails
JUST RECEIVED AT
Hatch & Fishers
Buy now before prices go up
UOUOR STORE AND SAMPLE ROOM
R. B. MATHIESON, PROP.
First door west of First National Bank, Dakota Ave. Jug
Trade Solicited. A full line of popular brands of Whiskies.
A itioice Vtptable Garden For 35 l«nis.
If you are not-a customer, we want yon to be one. If yon are, not a
customer, this exceptional offer ill interest you. Here is the cream
ol' our iist offered to you at 0 per cent discount i'rotn regular prices. 11
packets for 35c postpaid. One of each of the following: varieties.', Any
single packet at prices quoted.
Beet, Lightning The King of Early Beets.............
4-a: rot,
Queen—The Finest Grown
Lettuce, Whrlv Challenge—
Onion. Hed Wonder— Early, handsome, well flavored ...
lfarsnip,Hollow Crown .'.. .7..
(The Best Standard Variety)
Cabbage. Hollander—Late, Hat. firm, good
Musknielon, Kocky Ford—Handsome, delicious....
liadish, Rosy Quden -Early, deep red tipped wlute
Spinach, Mav's Perfection Large, thick, temlericaves.
'Tomato, Finest of all—Karl it st in Cultivation .-.
Cucumber, Mav's Favorite Pic'dns —A perfect sort ..
FH EE OATALOOr Describing many new and valu
able varieties of seeds, plants, l't tuts trees etc. Mention
this paper when ordering and receive a valuable novelty
free.
O«D®O®Q
L. I -MAY & GO, M. Paul, Minn."
The FREE PRESS
(3 gfoes the best class of Job Printing C3
at the most reasonable prices."
c®o
^*.2.
l*
r-v'^s
i*fr
1
nc
10c
10c
l()c
i)C
10c
5c
5c
5c
106
10c
,, „, ,/, y.....,^ vw^ ,jp^
v*. '•^•-1^-
A SHIP'S DOCTOR.
The Tliiiitt'N For Which lit* Should or
Slinuli! Sot He I'nid.
A correspondent of Lloyd's Weekly
lias expressed the views of a ship doc
tor iu the following words: ".Many
travelers arc In doubt as to the po
sition of the ship's doctor in regard to
his remuneration from passengers for
services rendered. The merchant ship
ping act enacts that every foreign go
ing vessel having a hundred persons on
board or upward shall carry on board
as part of lu:r (Complement a' duly
qualified medical praetioner. Further
more, an emigrant ship—i. e., a foreign
going vessel which carries tifty or
more steerage passengers-- must have
a medical man. irrespective of the
number of crew or of other passengers
carried. The salary of the doctor on
board is commensurate with these du
ties to his ship. To any passengers
who are suffering from ordinary forms
of seasickness and its concomitant,
evils or who receives injuries which
are in any way due to the ship the
doctor's services are free. For any
sickness contracted before sailing or
during a voyage which is not conneclcd
with the above named conditions lie is
entitled to a remuneration at: the same
rate as he would receive on shore. Ob
viously it would be as unfair to ex
pect that his services to passengers
should be rendered gratis as it would
be for any visitor in a hotel or travel
ing on a railway to expect to have
medical attention free in any illness
for which the hotel or railway authori
ties could not be hold responsible."
The writer of a letter to the London
Lancet says that the case of the ship's
surgeon is stated with accuracy in the
above sentences and adds that ship's
surgeons arc of two !:inds- first, those
who after they have qualified take
such a position either for health or for
pleasure, ami, second, those who elect
to make sea life a permanency.
The pay of the ship's doctor varies
from $ ii) to $50 a month. This is for
duties to .officers and crew. As regards
passengers in relation to the surgeon
the following groups will Include all:
First, the passenger who takes the
Initiative by remunerating the surgeon,
perhaps handsomely, for any services
rendered second, the passenger who
asks for his bill and pays it if reason
able third, the passenger who, travel
ing for the first time, does not know
whether to ask for his bill or wait for
it to be delivered, Init is pleased to be
enlightened on the matter fourth, the
passenger who clings to the old time
notion that the surgeon Is there solely
for the benefit of passengers, and, fifth,
the passenger who never intends to
pay the surgeon.—Medical Kecord.
He Tlioiiieht It Might Do.
When Patrick received an order ho
followed it: implicitly as far as, he could
—sometimes even further than his Cel
tlc Jiraln realized.
"He wants a pane o' windy glass tin
Inches by foortecn," said Patrick one
day as he entered a shop where his
employer, a master carpenter, traded.
In the shop was a young clerk who
never missed' a chance for a little joke
at the Irishman's 'expense.
"If we haven't' auy'ten-by-fourteens."
he said. "1 may have to give you a
fourteen-by-ten."
Patrick rubbed his head thought
fully. Then he stood .pondering for® a
moment: and at last remarked:
"He's in the great roosh for it. and
there's no other place near to get it.
Give me wan o' thim foorteen-by-tins,
and if he turrns it sideways and oop
'side down there's not a sowl would
'know the difference."—Youth's Com
panion.
Mirror*
.In the Middle A(«a.
In the middle ages, when steel and
silver mirrors were almost exclusively
used, a method of backing glass for the
same purpose with thin sheets of metal
was known. Small convex mirrors of
glass were made in Germany before
the sixteenth century and were in de
n)uiul riinlil comparatively modern
times. They were produced by blow
ing' small glass globes, into which
while they were hot was passed through
a.pipe.a mixture ofr.tin, antimony and.
rosin. When the globe was coated
insole it.-was allowed to cool and was
afterward cut into convex lenses, which
formed small .but well defined Images.
What Ednration Roen. .V
.The average educated man gets a
salary of ?1.0!0 a year. He works for
ty years, making, a total of $40.IMK) in
a lifetime.' The-average day laborer
gets .$1.50 a day 300 days In a year,
or $450 in a year. In forty years he
earns..1i8,000. .The difference, or $22
000, equals the.yalue of an education.
To acquire this earning capacity re
quires twelve years at school of 180
days eaeh -or 2,100 days. Divide $22,
000 by 2,106, and it i? found that.each
day at school is worth a little more
than $10 to the pupil.
Spawnger—l»'ve noticed considerable
change about you since you stopped
drinking. Mitr^ley—Well, I've noticed
that there's considerable more In my
pockW.—Philadelphia Press.
About Time.
Mr. S't'oplate—D'ye know, Miss. Cut
ting. I'd dearly love to travel. Miss
Cutting (meatdngly)—Well, why don't
you ?—Exchange.
Kdecatioa is
«rr "W
1
*J¥
}M}
t~
k'JV 'K-
wW
PIERRE, SOUTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, APRIL 27, 1905 ..
ODD INDUSTRIES OF PARIS.'
Th«re Arc MkIiI llankii of Mnuy IV
t-uliitr Vurlt'llm.
The raiuasseur du unit is the hum
blest member of the ragpickers" corpo
ration. lie is generally a laborer out
of work and collects whatever he can
tind and judges salable from a scrap
of paper or an orange peel to a dilapi
dated stove. Take old books, for ex
ample. However bad, they have a
market value, for they always contain
in the instep one sound piece that can
serve again and generally two or three
more at the heel and the back. Old
provision tins, again, are full of money
the lead soldering can be removed and
melted Into cakes, while the tin goes
to make children's toys. There are
about (1,000 of this class of night birds
in Paris. Auoiher quaint uiglit bird
is the "guardian angel." The "guard
ian angel" is a person attached to the
establishments of some »ia*-traqucis
low barkeepers—-and certain public
houses for the purpose of looking after
the safety of drunken customers, lie
accompanies tlieni to their homes, de
fends tlieni in case of need, as often
as not has
10
put them to bed and
leaves tlieni only when they are with
out the reach of mischief. lie earns
about ."id cents a day. Cases are also
on record where grateful drunkards
have remembered the "angel" in their
wills. To return the compliment: the
"angel" has invested some of his funds
in the purchase? of a'barrow, the object
of which is but too obvious.
An Important, night: bird is the mem
ber of the guild dc pattes mouillees.
He deals iu tobacco manufactured
from slumps of cigars and cigarettes
picked up in the street and holds as
sizes
011
the Place Maubert, by the
statue of Etienne Dolet, twice a wenk
at 3 a. 111. O11 these days the square is
called the "market of wet paws."
"The industry Is unite remunerative
on a modest: scale, of course, and
would be even.more so were it not for
the government which stepped In with
characteristic greed and on the
grounds of the monopoly it holds pro
ceeded to tax the tobacco collected
with so milch painstaking care.
YOUR WORK.
Do it cheerfully, even if It is not con
genial.
Do It in'the. spirit of an artist, nctf an
art!fc.-'i.
Make it a stepping stone to some
thing higher..
Keep yourself in condition to do it as
well as it call be done.
Endeavor to do It better than It has
ever been done before.
Make perfection y"ir aim and be sat
isfied with nothing less.
Lo not try to do it with a part of
yourself— Hie weaker part.
Recognize that work is the thing that
dignities and ennobles life.
Regard yourself as a coworker with
the Creator of the universe.
Accept the disagreeable part of it as
cheerfully as the agreeable.
('boose, if possible, the vocation for
which nature has fitted you.
Believe in its worth and dignity, no
matter how humble it: may lie.
Remember that work well done is the
highest testimonial of character you
can receive.—Success Magazine.
FIr*t Ji-Wflry Store.
It ma3' interest women to know that
the first: jewelry store was started in
the city of (.'hang On about. .'5,000 years
ago. The Celestial millionaires of that
period knew nothing of the l'M.sclnation
of diamonds, because diamonds were
not hi vogue at that B. C: period.
Pearls and jade and coral. and other
unpolished mineral substances had to
content them, and, as if to make good
the glitter of revieres and tiaras, the
princes of Chang On employed ar
tisans to fashion tlieni the most worir
derful gold and silver ornaments,
which in themselves were far more
costly than diamonds.—Boston Herald.
Order.
The chair lady rapped sharply.
"It shou'd not be necessary for the
chair to remind members," she said:
severely, "that under our rules of Op-"
dev. to say nothing of common/cour
tesy. only one member may be silent qt
a time. Any member who becomes sj
lent at the same time 'that another
member is silent is distinctly out of
order."
The ladies of the club visibly cringed
under this merited rebuke. Many of
them Hushed To the roots Of their hail',
and several there were who burst into
tears.-Life.
Dos:'* KlNNCM CauMed Tumor'.'
The danger of kissing (logs is illus
trated by the experience of'a" yottng
lady which is told In the Lonclon Lan
cet. She had been in the hajvjt of fon
dling and kissing a pet dog!* and when
she developed a tumorous growth it
was discovered that her trouble was
due to the presence of a number of
worms which had been transferred
from: the dog to the tissue's., o?'ftukr
cheek.
Why He T^ancrhed.
,?*.*
,'- ^v, -"t
,, ~v\
"S—)'
•.
,w
i-'i --i .w:
^V'
t*.
ML
V'J'
"Oh, George dear, I'm so glad you've
e»nie home! We've had burglars in
the flat, and th'ey took all our silver
and beat the Janitor dreadfully! What
are you layghlng-at.r'
"I'f® l2ufiullig brC2iia6 bej&t tut
llnimniouil, Wla.
A
7nr
WtrjL „.:
A11 the lest at right prips,
PJvmbing and Gas-fitting.
Exclusive Stock
Vi
When "you.buy Eootwear you will find
it much to your advantage to purchase at
E E S I E S O E S O E
1
where the purchaser never, fails to find
THE LARGEST STOCK
uf 'BO.OTS. StlOfiS, RUBBERS, OVER.
SHOES and-,!in fact, anything in that line
...MrS. Mina Bojberg
^v« t'v f» 4
Rust-Owen Lumber Co.
.-i
'r¥r
5
Past Through Trains Daily
ojrer the only double-lrack railway between
tlfe Missburi River. Excellent trafn service and fa^ trmn
1 schedules from all points' in Iowa, Minnesota and 'the
Dakotas. .-Two trains a day to
San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portianf
service of Pullman comparttnent, dratflng-roora'
loifrtsts'sleeping' cars, dining cars, library and.observj|tiop
v». caps, buffet. smoking, .cars and f^e reclining chair cats,
Dftils and Veripnpllt? Conducted Excursions
For.tlckets andlnforauitlon applyto agtnts.Of
Nofth-Westerk Line
i&s
"STf
1M
Binder & Borst, 11
... ....
Dealers in
NO, 50.
vfin vH
\t
•"viv
Ptg
.X,'
it
J,
\«r
5r?
$
4
iH WS't
1r*
Ms
I
•i.
S'T1
.•
1
1*
IP
P-
4. S
ft Z-
.P
Hard and Soft Coal
TT_
?ana*'
4^
•Mm

xml | txt