OCR Interpretation


Pierre weekly free press. (Pierre, S.D.) 1889-19??, October 27, 1910, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn98062890/1910-10-27/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

o*
OL. XXVII
FLOUR:
OWNERS
Hi
I! ,'! mj
if I
I
l"V».r
lii'ln'J
''A
DAKOTA AVENUE
P1IONK 60
*5.
Pepsin and Iron Tablets
TONIC AND DIGESTIVE*
Digest what You Eat: Make Rich Red Blood.
YOU FEEL STRONGER EVERY DAY
•'.
At Yll Druggists or by Mail, Postpaid
Soc Per Box
H. M. STRAIGHT & CO.
PIERRE SOUTH DAKOTA
ftTT"
OF
GAS BELT LAN I) aid ABSTRACT CO.
J. A. DAVY, President JOHN I. NEWELL, Secretary
PIERREV'SOUTH DAKOTA.
Capital $100,000.00 Individual Responsibility $150,-000.00
Also, Hughes County Abstract Company, Capital $25,000
ONLY ABSTRACT BOOKS
And automobile supplies of all kinds. Satisfaction in all lines.
The patronage of the public is respectiuliy solicited.
Otfice, 325 Pierre Street. Telephone, 78
CuragOi North-Western Hotel Comer. Telephone 1"»3 It.
REFERTNOES:
Any Banker, Business Man or Farmer in Hughes County.
fe
LIKE A RARE GEM
Pierre flour compares with other
flours as a diamond excels all other
gems in brilliance and value. They
may be geod Hours at that—ours is
better. Basis: Strictly selected high
high grade wheat, most approved pro
cesses of milling, cleanliness and
constant care. So Pierre tlour is
what we claim it to be—the best flour
made.
CAPITOL MILLING CO
IN
Abstracts ol'Title Pnvnl*i!i«d Promptly
Guaranteed by 95.000 Bond.
WE BUY AND SELL REAL PROPERTY OF ALL KINDS
Wc Pay and Sell «u Easy
WE HANDLE THE FORD, BOISK AND FRAMXLIN AUTOMOBILES
HUGHES
COUNTY
DON'T MAKE A MOVE
TOD Notch Prices Paid for Farm and Dairy Products.
Special attention paid to Phone orders, and prompt deliver
ies made.
towards buying a house, lot or towards
building plot of any kind until- you
have consulted with us. Foresight is
better than hind sight and regrets by
long odds and you will have no reason
to say "it might have been" if you let
us show you the choice investment
property, building plots or attractive
homes that we will sell you on easy
terms and at prices that will be sure to
advance quickly.
THE PIERRE RACKET STORE
Dry Goods Notions Shoes Groceries
ON IMPROVED FF\RM LANDS
WM. C. NOTMEYER
PIERRE, S. D.
LUCAS REALTY CO.
I'IKKKE, SO. OAK.
W. A. MOWER
'J' tf if
FRANK CUNNINGHAM
JL1! .iiii &. JL
Dealer in all kinds ofT--
Fish, Poultry, Lard, Oysters, Etc.
My stock is the best to be had, and I am fully prepared to fill
[orders promptly, guaranteeing quick delivery. I respectfully
'solicit a share of your patronage.
PHONE CONNECTION. Davis Building, EAST PIERRE.
LORN
The New $5.00 bills will be small,
says an exchange. Easier to break,
too, we presume. ,,
What is the name for the gait
women adopt when going faster than
a fast walk? It isn't running, is it?
Chicago News: This is a free coun
try and every community is entitled
to just the kind of government it
otes for.
South Dakota farmers are getting
18 cents for wool. Got 27 last year.
But do you notice any reduction in
the cost of true clothing?
Ex-Governor Elrod is out stumping
the state for Governor Vessey. The
insurgent and the stalwart are fighting
side by side in a commendable effort to
save the state.
New York campaign opened with
Hearst and Pulitzer roasting Roose
velt and Alton B. Parker roasting
Tammany. They do scramble up
tilings so, down east!
The way the farmers keep up fall
plowing is not indicative of any crop
trouble in 1911. Stubble will be a
rare tiling by the time J. Frost forces
the plows iuto retirement for the win
ter. •"U?
j'&k:
No blame can be attached to Col.
Roosevelt for his criticism of Tana
many. The colonel is so construct
ed that he cannot see a tiger without
taking a shot at it.
Doctor Crippen, the American den
tist, has been found guilty and sen
tenced to hang for the murder of his
wife.. This is justice swift and sure
for of Crippen's guilt, there is scarce
ly any question.
Deadwood is to be one of the points
for ine experimenting- in the postal
savings bank proposition. The govern
ment is starting the project on a small
scale hoping that experience will show
the way for a development of the idea.
W'e note that for three years all
persons suspected of having $10,000
bills in their possession have been
subjected to covert scouting by secret
service agents, and here we are think
ing that the strange man who looked
so hard at us the othei day was inter
ested in our straw hat.
Every democrat who supports his
party slogan in the state will have to
vote for suffrage. Every progres
sive who really believes in human
rights will vote for suffrage. Every
stand pat republican who glories in
the party that freed human slaves
will vote for suffrage. Why not?
Congressman Martin and Burke
have more than made good at Wash
ington, and at the election on Nov. 8
will be returned to serve two years
more in the national house of repre
sentatives, where they have reflected
great honor on themselves and their
state.
A rehearing of the Missouri river
cases have been refused by the su
preme court. As a result the order
of the interstate commerce commis
reducing the class rates between
Mississippi river crossings and Mis
souri river cities on freight originat
ing at Atlantic seaboard points will
go into effect.
The express companies should be
made to pay their just proportion of
taxes. They do not do so now and
cannot be made to do so under exist
ing laws. The last legislative body
attempted to pass a law to crowd ex
press companies up to the tax paying
counter, and now we are told that a
stringent law will be passed at the
session next winter, and that express
companies will no longer shirk the
payment of a just tax.
The woman who has a sealskin coat
in good preservation possesses a soar
ing asset. Dealers in furs say that
the (advance the price of sealskins is
anywhere from 25 to 80 per cent,
caused by the prohibiting the killing
of seals for five years after May 1
next. It is declared that the only hope
of getting a new seal skin from Alas
ka in the prohibitive period will be
from a Japanese poacher, and the
poacher's only hope to cateh one will
lie in dodging the extremely active
revenue cutters of the Bering sea pa
trol fleet. A real real skin jacket
therefore ranks high on the roll ol
luxuries.
PIERRE. SOUTH DAKOTA THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27. 1910.
TOWN WITHOUT TAXES
tfhe thriving little town of Java,
situated in the extreme north central
part of the state, is one of the few
towns in the state or northwest which
is in Such excellent financial condi
tion that it was not necessary this
year to levy taxes, there being suffi
cent funds in the town treasury to
run the town during the coming year.
The town had an outstanding bonded
indebtedness of only $2,000, and this
now has been wiped out, leaving the
town without a cent of indebtednees,
bonded or otherwise. The bonds
were not due for some years yet, but
the town board prevailed upon the
holders to surrender them at this
time.
^•RESOLUTION BY LEAGUE
Sheriff J. W. Laughlin and States Attor
ney Glenn W. Marten* are Endorsed.
Pierre, Oct. 24, JfltO.—To the Edi
tor: The Pi' ere iCnforcement Lea
gue held a if Saturday even
ing and passe*.. the following
motion: "That this League endorse
the action of the States x\.ttorney and
the Sheriff in their efforts to enforce
the liquor laws in this county."
And instructed the Secretary to
send a copy of this motion to the
newspapers of the city for publica
tion as news matter. It was also
thought advisable to offer the follow
ing news item:
"Recent investigation developed
the fact that some doctors are giving
prescriptions for liquor on the re
quest of the patient, for nominal
charges, as low as 25 cents, It is the
sense of this League that such prac
tice should be discouraged and dis
continued."
W J.
undt
S
kc'y.
A SAD CASE
A sad case occurred in Ft. Pierre
yesterday when Arthur Lafferty was
brought hu ir 1 rr hoan gr.
rested and brought in by officers for
non^ittendance upon a case in which
he was subpoenaed as a witness.
Upon vkty.j'iuSfcion he told the judge
that the reason he did not arrive on
time was that his mother was dying.
"Where is she now?" asked Judge
Boucher. "Dead and buried," was
the young man's reply, aud such
proved to be the case, Mrs. Lafferty's
death and burial having taken place
at Dupree while her son was in jail
at Ft. Pierre.
A SOLOMON ON THE BENCH
While the higher courts of the state
would more than likely frown upon the
decision of Justice Gallagher, of Mid
land, in a recent case before him, a
general application of his method of
dispensation of justice would be a
strong reterrent in many cases. It
seems that a farmer came into Midland
with a load of flax. After unloading he
went up town to secure dinner and
other refreshments and on his return,
there appeared to be a disagreement be
tween himself and the elevator man in
regard to settlement for the flax, the
trouble landing them both in court.
After hearing all thq testimony of
both sides of the case, Justice Gallagh
er decided that both were equally to
blame for the trouble, and he split the
fine and coats between the two, order,
ing each to pay half. They paid, and
all is serene out on that part of Bad
river.
EDUCATORS TO MEET.
One of the most important gather
ings of educators in the history of
South Dakota will be held in Huron
beginning on Tuesday, November 1,
and continue three'ds$yj|. It will be
the 28th annual session of the South
Dakota Educational association and
will be attended by at least 1,200 edu
cators and delegates fyom all parts
of the state. There will also be pres
ent many well known educators and
literary men from other states.
S A MERITORIOUS MENTION.
The Morristown World pays this
concise tribute to Gov. Robert S.
Vessey, republican: "He is the same
honest, plain big-hearted man year
after year. He stands above office or
honors. He stands squarely on the
Roosevelt platform and has the un
limited confidence of the man the na
tion loves. It is indeed fortunate
that the people have such a clear
headed man at the head of state
affairs a man whom all trust and
whose chief aim is the welfare of the
people. He ^111 be re-elected by the
biggest majority ever given a public
official in the state, and every candi
date on the ticket with him has the
confidence of the people, second term
enaiul.SatttfiBeiaftUke."
HOME RULE
Bishop Tuttle of Missouri believes
in the good old democratic doctrine
of home rule. He declares: "All
true Americans, it seems to me, ought
to strive to.maintain and perpetuate
the American principles. State-wide
prohibition violates, and local option
supports these principles. Therefore
I am opposed to state-wide prohibi
tion and in favor of local option."
After ample trial, wherever it has
been tried, it has been found that
prohibition does not prohibit, but
breeds lawlessness instead of sobriety
and moderation. It is impossible to.
make men abstemious by law, and it
is unfair to try to do so. Let the peo
ple of each town aud city settle the
matter to suit themselves and abide
by the rule of the majority. That is'
home rule, aud under it the majority
can shift from side to side as the
citizens view the necessities of the
case.
DIKE ACCEPTS POSITION
Huron Huronite: As the result of a
recent action taken by the directors
of the Northwestern railroad, Huron
has been placed in line for becoming
one of the largest headquarters on
the great Northwestern system. Gen
eral supervision offices over the Da
kota, Minnesota, and Pierre and
Rapid City divisions have been trans
ferred to Huron from Chicago and
this city is to be hereafter the head
quarters for several thousand miles
of railroad lines.
The action which brought about
these changes was taken with the
election of new general officers be
cause of the resignation of Marvin
Hughitt. C. T. Dike was placed in
the position of general superintend
ent of the Dakota ana Minnesota
divisions, and on November 1, he
will take charge of the Northwestern
lines in Minnesota and South Dako
ta with his offices at Huron. This
morning workmen commenced to
add several rooms to tho second story
of the division superintendent's
building, and suitable, apartments
wil.' be fitted up here for Mr. Dike to
occupy until the erection or a new
passenger station.
THE PLAN IS CHANGED
It the hope of insuring a settlement
among the Indians of a desirable class
of white men, the Indian burean re
cently promulgated a new set of regula
tions for the sale of surplus lands held
bv the
Ind*HnH*
Tha nAW rnlpo annlv
4* -4/
to all lands throughout the country and
comprises several million-acres. Their
principal feature feature is a provision
for deferred payment in the purchase of
Indian land. Under the present sys
tem the purchaser is required to pay
cash at the time of sale. This plan has
resulted in giving a great advantage
to at or a a a
on to he in of a a
settlers. The new rules require an
immediate payment of only 10 per'ce nt
of the purchase price, and allow* f$ie
years for the completion of the tAnfc
action, the purchaser paying interest
upon his notes.
THE COUNTY OPTION FIGHT
Sioux City Journal: Of the "pro
posed laws to be submitted to the
voters the greatest interest appears
to be manifested in the proposed
county option law. That there is
strong opposition to the proposed law.
That there is strong opposition to
the proposed law is natural, for
Soush Dakota was once a prohibition
state, and those who resided in it at
the time clearly remember that it
was an era of "blind pigs" and gen
eral disregard of the prohibition
clause in the state constitution. The
"blind pigs" were suceeded by sa
loons run openly under the monthly
tine system. Conditions were de
plorable, aud at the first opportunity
the voters of the Btate repealed the
prohibition clause of the constitution
and returned to the high license sys
tem, which has sin.ee prevailed.
County option is looked upon as the
entering wedge to statewide prohibi
tion, and is being stoutly opposed by
thousands of leading citizens of the
state, who in numerous communi
ties have organized what they term
home rule leagues, whose motto is to
permit each community to manage its
own affairs. ,t
-f.v DUE TO EARTHQUAKES
Naples, Oct. 25.—Fully 300 in Italy,
are dead in earthquakes and storms,
and soldiers are carrying reiief to the
striken. Many roads are covered to a
depth of tnirty feet with mud, making
the work of relief difficult. The king
has
Bent
warships to the islands near
here, wlips raurh damageia reported.
V:'. V. c-
$
jZ-A'M
NO. 25
PREJUDICE
It is amazing what a large part pre
judice plays in the affairs of the nation.
This was spoken of at the Equal Buf
frage meeting recently held here in
which it was stated that predjudice was
the hardest thing that equal suffrage
advocates had to contend with.
But equal suffrage is not the only
sufferer because of this whim of the
people to make up their minds and
whether right or wrong, stay by it
without so much as listening to the
other side oT the question. Without
doubt it is prejudice that is responsible
for the iight attendance at the equal
suffrage meetings. This is also respon
sible for the small number of demo
cratic meetings and the small number
of democrats who turn out to hear re-*.
publican speakers.
And it is not only politics that pre
judice plays a large part in. It was
prejudice that kept our business men
of the past from adopting modern
methods. The attitude of the people
seems to be the same old Irishman who
when accused of being narrow minded
replied "1 am open to conviction," then
added in an undertone, "But it will
take a divil of a good man to convince
men."
Many other instances might be given
but it is not necessary. It is an en
couraging 1'uct that prejudice plays a
much smaller part in the world today
than it did in the past so there is some1
hope that it may in time be done away
with. Here's hoping that it is and also
here's to the broad minded man who
will listen to both sides of the question
and then decide for himself which is
the correct one.
ACTIVE BUYERS.
The Pacific coast packing centers
are taking all the. South Dakota and
Nebraska hogs they can get. Se
cently six cars were shipped west
from towns in eastern Nebraska. It
is a common thing for hogs to be
shipped from points in South Dakota
on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul to Seattle and other cities on
the coagt. Chicago has long been
the Center of the live stock market.
and may continue to be the leader ir*
that line but Iowa, Nebraska and
South Dakota are going to send bo^a
to the coast if the prices continue to
be attractive.
INQUIRING ABOUT SALARY.
Railroad lawyers having business
with the interstate commerce coinmis-
siou are keen to learn something
about the probable composition of the
new commerce court, the members of
which are yet to be appointed, but
who will not be nominated, as it is
understood, until after the reassembl
ing of congress. The names of a num
ber ol aspirants have been mentioned
in a furtive way, but their friends
are working so well under cover that
it would be mere guesswork to un
dertake to indicate just who will con
stitute the court. Chairman Knapp,
of the interstate commerce
vsion, has been most frequently men
tioned for presiding judge of the new
court. ,,,
.v.t
STANLEY COUNTY POLITICS
Harrold Pioneer: The newspapers
of Stanley county seem to b© taking
a hand in the graft of certain county
officers in a way that may do some
good in the future. It charged that
certain county ollicials are receiving
up in the hundreds of dollars more
salary than the law allows. This is
graft that the people should know
about aud although this writer is a
republican, he would have a troubled
conrcience to vote for any candidate
that would not raise his hand to stop
such work.
By the published reports, Stanley
county has sunn deeper and deeper in
in debt until the county debt is over
$200,000.00, evidently by extravigant
manipulation of county affairs.
Burg Brown, the democratic candi
date for states attorney, is a practic
ing attorney and has been for the past
thirty years. The writer knew him
well and favorably in Iowa before
coming to South Dakota. Graft in
county matters would be unknown, if
the matters such as are going on in
Stanley county should be brought to
his notice.
7 V.
1
Mm
1
in'
commis-
Governor Carrol of Iowa refuses to
name a successor to the late Senator'
II
Carroll says he will leave it
to the next legislature. As Carroll^
may be a candidate for the senatorial
toga there appears to be some sense
to the stand he has taken.
MS®!
:r
—.
It is better to have a democrat
elected to that office if it will have a
tendency to clean up some of the con*,
ditions that exist hnd save the ooiint^
thoniinrtr"*
it

xml | txt