OCR Interpretation


Pierre weekly free press. (Pierre, S.D.) 1889-19??, May 04, 1911, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn98062890/1911-05-04/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

r\,,^
WUd
Pepsin and Iron Tablets
TONIC AND DIGESTIVE*
Digest what You Eat. Make Rich Red Blood,
YOU FEEL STRONGER EVERY DAY
At VII Druggists or by Mail, Postpaid
soc Per Box
H. M. STRAIGHT & CO.
PIERRE SOUTH DAKOTA
W D. OLDFIELD
HAS NOW ON SALE A FULL LINE OF CHOICE!
Fresh and Cured Meats, Fish,
Sausages, Poultry, Pickles, Etc.
I pay highest market price for butter, eggs, fat stock, poultry
and hides. I solicit your patreuage.
Phone 156-B Pleasant Drive, near Pierre Street
MUM try LU
nn
P'
1 -1 1
ON IMPROVED FARM LANDS
WM. C. NOTMEYER
PSERRE, S. D.
1 11
Veterinary Surgeon and Dentist
All diseasos of domestic animalo successful
ly treated. Injuries skillfully handled and
cured where a cure can be effected.
PIKKKE. S. It.
:1MH
No Vacation.,
*7
5^
liSS/N
I
msf rWkA_
mjss&SL
V.
r\
r\
S in
1 LU
I
OF THIS STORE
Everything- in our store is of good quality. Our goods
will surely appeal to those who appreciate right things.
We make a point of buying nothing below a price which
will insure good quality in
FRESH GROCERIES
FRUiTS AND PROVISIONS
You will find here a full line of goods, including all
goods offered by any dealer anywhere. I sell upon a pos
itive guarantee that- goods are right.
F. E. BRTTIN
Phone 2-3-3 The Leading Grocer.
DR. W. C. HULL DR. HATTIE JOHNSON
Call or write
Business University
PIERRE, SO. DAK.
SPRING_ IS HERE
(Jiuy your Seed Grains of Us.
We have a complete line of pure clean seed grains.
We grind our own feed so you are sure of it being pure
and fresh when buying of us.
Grain at wholesale prices when taken by the load. .2?
x£Sa
PIERRE HAY & FEED COMPANY
"The New Feed Store."
VOL. XXVII PIERRE. SOUTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, MAY 4. 1911.
r\
IIU
r\
~\j
\n
W
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
All chi'onie and acute cases treated
successfully. Womens and child
rens diseases a specialty.
Suite 3 Hyde Block
After Scfioof Wfi'at
Why not learn Shorthand
or Bookkeeping
ENTER ANY TIME
3£7 S2?
•L—f.j.Jt-*-*?.. j.
In his artless Japanese way the .Mi
kado must be wondering whether
Hobson does his alarming .for tun or
whether he gets a regular salary.
Governor Vessey has granted a par
don to Earl Johnson, who was sent
from Minnehaha comity on a charge
of robbery in the second degree.
Many saloons in Iowa must close
because of the recent ruling of the
Iowa supreme court, restricting the
number of saloons to a town to one
for each one thousand inhabitants.
The people in the vicinity of Meen
ville, Stanley county, are preparing
for a celebration on the 17th of May,
and are preparing for a large crowd
to assist them in their jollifications
for that day.
On a requisition Dr. II. II. Mug
glev, a mining promoter of the Black
Hills, has been arrested at Kansas
City and brought to Deadwood to be
tried for obtaining money under false
pretenses.
The members of the appraising
crew of the Rosebud lands state that
they expect to complete their work
about August 1 next, when about
1.000,000 acres of the surplus will be
opened to white settlers.
Tli'e Huron college endowment fund
has passed the $50,000 mark in Huron
alone. With the subscriptions from
other parts of the state the fund luis
a total of over Sue,000. Eastern con
tributions will raise the amount to
over $250,000.
All South Dakotans are asked to
remember that, the western portion of
their nearest and most easily acces
sible summer recitation ground, and
that the Black Hills lias attractions
of climate, scenery and trout fishing
unexcelled anywhere.
"The time is not far distant when
alfalfa will be one of the principal
crops of South Dakota. Every far
mer in the state, should he taking an
interest in and making a thorough
study of this great forage producer,"
remarks the Watertown Opiuion.
We understand that a steam or
trasoline engine prairie breaking out
lit will be here and begin operations
some time next week, having con
tracted with Smith & Ashmore for
080 acres of breaking. A considera
ble acreage of prairie sod beside this
wi 11 be turned over this vpa.r,—Reli
ance Record.
Our British cousins are becoming
very much exercised about the prose
lytizing efforts of Mormon mission
aries through Great Britain. That
many converts to the Mormon faith
must have been made is evidenced by
the serious consideration given by
high church dignitaries and promin
ent laymen to ways and means for
checking the movement.
111 UUgliVUU
,v
ilcy county
wheat is fully an inch and ahalf high,
and promises all that a crop could under
any sun. Within two years it will be
an easy matter to convince the most
skeptical that lands west of the river
are more fertile than lands elsewhere
in South Dakota. A drive across the
Frozen Man flat, near Sansare, at this
time, will tell the wise where to get off
at in selecting a home.
Conservation of forest resources by
the general government has been
placed on its feet by the United
States supreme court, which holds
that the jurisdiction of the general
government is paramount to the jur
isdiction of the state in which the
forest is located. Western stockmen
precipitated the fight that has ended
in their defeat, that they might enjoy
unhampered grazing privileges in the
forest tracts.
A steam engine prairie breaking
outfit from Presho last week started
in on a 700-acre prairie breaking con
tract in the vicinity of Reliance for
the real estate tirm of Smith & Ash
more. They have a 32-horse power
double cylinder cross compound
Beeves engine that pulls ten 14-inch
plows. The outfit is £s.p£tbls -of 20 to
30 acres per day. A. R. McMulleu
has rigged up his steam engine for
prairie breaking and is about ready
to begin operations. His engine will
poll four 10-inch plows. A great
amount of eastern Lyman county sod
will be broken this spring. Many
team breaking outfits will also be at
work.—Reliance Record.
••&•••
frjeskP*
FARMER INVESTS IN
HIGH PRICED LAND
Codington County School Land Bring*
High Prices—Farmer Pay* $136
an Acre for One Forty
Showing the great faith which the
ill
This is the highest price ever paid
for wild, unimproved land in this
comtv, bought for farming purposes
only.
In addition to buying one 40-acre
tract at $130 an acre, Mr. Ehrke was
the purchaser of several other tracts
of the same size. Including the forty
a*t $130 an acre, he purchased a 320
tract in Pelican township at an aver
age of $92.1:! an acre, all virgin soil.
Also he bought the northeast quar
ter of section thirty-six, 110-53, at an
average price of $66.88 per acre—Pub
lic Opinion.
PASSES ON LIBEL- CA-SE
The Slierin-Eastwood troubles at
Watertown came up in the supreme
court last Friday in a reversal of the
circuit court of Codington county in
which Judge Marquis directed a ver
dict for the defendant in a libel suit
brought by Sherin. This meaus a
new trial. The case of J- K. Gorman
vs. P. II. and W. C. Madden from
Haniiin county was reversed.
STATE SUNDAY SCHOOL ASS'N
Next year Watertown will have the
honor of entertaining the annual con
vention of the South Dakota Sunday
school association, that body having
selected that city as the place for
their rvext meeting. The convention
which just closed at Huron, was the
largest and most interesting in the
history of the organization. The of
licers for the year are: President, C.
11. Leggett of Ft. Pierre vice presi
dent, T. II. llagen of Huron secre
tary, F. P. Leach of Sioux Falls
treasurer, B. 1). Frederick of Sioux
Falls.
CHARTERS GRANTED
Llano Grande Development Co.,
Ft. Pierre, $2,000,000.
Twin City Engineering School of
Trades, Huron, $50,000.
Mulleague Grocery Co., Philip,
$10,000.
I'isli and Hunter Co., Deadwood,
$50,000.
First State Bank of Powell, Powell,
$10,000.
Zimmerman Mfg. Co., Pierre, $100,
$100,000.
Sioux Falls and Southern Ry. Co.,
Pierre, $300,000.
American Placer Corporation,
Pierre,
$5,000,000.
Caton Company, Caton, $25,000.
Cottondale Plantation Co., Pierre,
$100,000.
Illinois-Northwest Colonization Co.
Milbank, $200,000.
Insulated Vacuum Refrigerator Co.
Pierre, $35,000.
Geo. A. Clark Printing Co., Red
field, fl0,000.
Cyclone Ditch Co., Rapid City, $15,
000.
Johnson Bros. & Pitcher Realty
Co., Sioux Falls, $25,000.
Pierre Humane Society, Pierre.
Twenty-three hundred pounds of al
falfa seed sold in one day is a recent
record of one Rapid City establish
ment. This indicates that people are
coming to recognize the important
part that alfalfa is to play in making
valuable farms in western South Da
kota.
It appears that J. H. Peckham is
not to have things all his own way in
his application for re-appointment as
oil inspector for the southern district
of the state. J. S. Mueller of Parks
ton has developed a desire for that
jjj.lace, and is pushing his claims.
The secretary of the interior has
announced the appointment of A. C.
Bprland as superintendent of Wind
Cave, National park, to succeed Ru
fus J. Pilcher, resigned.
EnKtMiu, from her port of entry at
Hong Kong, is probably having more
real war to consider in China than all
tbe American troops in Texas have
facing them aero— the Rio Grande.
I"*"
'*Yh
tut?
pi
uu
um llg
value of Codington county soil, and
their absolute confidence in future
values, Albert Ehrke, one of the sub
stantial farmers of the county, yes
terday at the sale of school lands,
paid $130 an acre for a forty in Pel
icau township, about seven miles
from Watertown, and without other
value save as agricultural land.
,-v. -. 1/ rj:r.T
§r
J^v"-
-J
ABERDEEN LAND OFFICE
CHANGES LOCATION
The Aberdeen land office, establish
ed since 1881, was moved last week to
Timber Lake. P. D. Kribs, for six
years register of the office, was re
appointed to that position and will
move out to Timber Lake. The pres
ent receiver, J. E. Adams, who has
tilled that position the past four years
has resigned rather than move away
from Aberdeen and J. L. Parrott of
Mobridge will succeed him. The
chief clerk ot the office, Alexander
George, who has been connected with
the office the past ten years, and Les
lie Weeks, for some time past a clerk
will both go to Timber I.riko. A
culiar feature of the moving of the.
office is the fact that all records, let
ters, heavy books, files, etc., are be
ing shipped out in mail pouches.
IRON THAT PIERRE GRADE
Aberdeen News: Now that winter
can be considered as gone .for this
trip, the people of South Dakota
would be pleased to see something
which would indicate railway build
iug iu the state. Real building, and
not merely promoting. Up to the
present there is nothing delinite in
sight aloug such lines, unless the
proposed line between this city and
Pierre, on which the Minneapolis &
St. Louis has a year's option, devel
opes something. The" other roads in
the state do not hold out any promises
just at present.
STATE LAND SALES OVER
The state land department has com
pleted its offerings of state school
lands for this year, and while the
acreage sold was not so large as for
last year, .the
average
was far above that of any other year
in which sales have been made. The
sales reached 19,007 acres, bringing a
total of $089,052 to the fund, of which
OP nav naitf miiut* Uii naiVl ii% .-louli »nl-
many of the purchasers paid the full
amount, and the permanent fund will
be in shape to supply demands for
many loans pending. By counties
the sales were: Davison, 2,200 acres,
at an average of $54.BO Hanson, 55,
885 acres, with an average of $50.54
Hutchinson, 2,103 acres, average $54.
88 Codington, 3,139 acres, average
$50.34 Deuel, 1,153 acres, average
$27.34 Iiamlin, 4,180 acres, average
864.03 Day, 1,408 acres, average £32.
00 Jirovvn, 750 acres, average $50.38
making the general average for the
State $52.03. Most of this land was
purchased by owners of adjacent
tracts, and was bought on what they
considered to be the actual value of
the land to them for farming pur
poses, and it was not speculative buy
ing. Some of the tracts went above
$100 an acre. At such prices the
school fund of the state will run into
many millions more than the found
ers of the state ever dreamed of when
they placed a minimum selling price
of $10 an acre on such lands.
The maintenance of way employes
of six railroads to tha number of two
thousand five hundred struck Tues
ili) night for the recognition of a an
ion wage increase. The total involv
ed in strike and
be estimated at 12,000.
JIM HILL
Jim Hill is optimistic, not with
standing the decision of the inter
state commerce commission relative
to raising of freight rates. Mr. Hill is
spending a few days iu New York and
upon his arrival there said: ''Too
early to forcast the year's crop it
was certain that in the west there
would be an unusually large acreage,
larger than last year. That business
in the northwest was steady, cautions
and on the whole very fair. That the
recent rate decision had not affected
the Great Northern or the Northern
Pacific." He called attention to what
these roads had spent in improve
ments during the last five years aud
declared the road would keep this up,
but that at present neither road was
contemplating any new financing.
The trend of Mr, Hi]
1
's interview was
quite optimistic for uiui, much so, as
cocapared with his recent interviews.
The fact is, so far as the west iB con
cerned that its people are prosperous,
they are making money and if the
crop of this section proves a good
one, nothing can retard the develop
ment of the west. Eastern conditions
are not to control in the great west
hereafter. The east has its problems,
the west has her's, and both have
them to solve, but tbe west is not de
pendent as formerly on the east and
each mark's a further independence.
In this lessee**,.
^•torio,.
-,'U^ \V
NEW
price
secured
NO. 52
UP AGAINST IT
IN REAL EARNEST
Old time tanchers in the northwest
part of tbe state are not enthusiastic
over the repeal of the free range law,
but feel that they are up against the
situation for keeps, and are making
arrangements to either dispose of the
"larger share of their cattie, or else
are looking for new locations, in
Montana and Wyoming. It waB
thought that Hardiug county would
be one of the last to change condi
tions, aud that a vote for the wiping
out of the free range could not be se
cured in that county for many years,
but the general repeal of the lant hah.
sion was an end to that hope, and the
cattlemen are getting ready for the
change as fast as they can. This will
mean that a number of the old timers
will leave the state for sections where
they can have range for a few years
longer, but it is only a question of
time when they will have to meet the
same situation further west, with no
new place to go to, and it will be up
to them to sell. While the elimina
tion of the free range means that the
big herds will liaye to go it does not
mean that there will not be about as
many cattle as ever to ship. The
only difference will be that instead of
any one particular mau or company
shipping train loads, it will be in the
way of sales of a few head from each
of many farms, aud net cash returns
to the state greater than under the
old method.
DORMITORY AT PIERRE
Plans have been perfected for a
new dormitory to be constructed at
the Pierre Indian schools at a cost of
$35,000. The appropriation was made
in the last Indian bill. The Indian
commissioner has directed that the
new building shall be known as
Burke hall" out of respect to Chas.
II. Burke of South Dakota, former
chairman of the house committee on
Indian affairs. An appropriation of
of about $22,000 is also available to
install an irrigation system at the
Pierre school. It will be unique in
that it contemplates irrigation by
pumping water from the Missouri
riyer, the power to be furnished by
natural gas from an artesian well..
C. C. Witt, who has acted as en
gineer for the state railway commis
sion in its woik of securing physical
valuation of the railways of the state,
resigned that position and will go to
Kansas where he has secured the po
sition of engineer for the state muni
cipal utilities commission, which was
created by tlie last legislative session
of the Htnto.
3
MANY LOANS WANTED ife
While the recent sale of School
lands has brought about $300,000 to
the permanent school fund which is
available for loaning, this sura will
not by any means fill the applications
which are on lile- in the department
for loans from that fund. Just at
present the applications are near
$700,000, and for a number of years
the applications have always been far
ovnooa
rale of interest was reduced, which
1
so included the time before the bus
iness expansion in the state for the
past ten years, the fund grew to such
proportions that the state department
under the authority granted it by
law, forced the money out each year
upon the counties, to get some .return
upon the cash on hand, and just as,
soon as the counties upon which it
was forced could legally get it back
into the treasury, they hurried it
back and stopped the interbat charge
which was made against the county
while the money laid in the different
county treasuries. liut now instead
of forcing out the money, the ques
tion is to apportion the fund on hand
equitably between the counties which
are calling for it instead of dodging
it.
In the supfeme court this week an
opinion was banded down by Judge
Whiting in the case of Charles Valen
tine ys. G. A. and S. S. Gilbourne, in
which the circuit court of Brown
e.ouiity was affirmed in a^soft for pay
ment for drilling a well.
LOST HER BRAID
Little Miss Era I^att oOIarroid
few days ago lost a fine long braid of
hair from her head by a peculiar ac
cident. She was playing near soma
horses, whsn nnn
nf
her, catchiqg tke4»r*iL
her until it tore loose from
leaving a very much frigbton6£jgiil^
getting away from such a danf
animal aa
I
?a
1
il

xml | txt