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Pierre weekly free press. (Pierre, S.D.) 1889-19??, April 03, 1913, Image 1

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VOL. XXIX
PIERRE 1882
-j.
1 1
ial Bank
IT
N.
A N
HAPPY HOME REAi*ESTVfE
Pepsin and Iron Tablets
TONIC AND DIGESTIVE*
Digest what You Hat. Make Rich Red Blood.
YOU FEEL STRONGER EVERY DAY
At'Vll Druggists or by Mail, Postpaid
,i 50c Per Miox •.
H. M. STRAIGHT & CO.
PIERRE SOUTH DAKOTA
CORWIN D. MEAD
Real Estate and Mortgage Loans
Buys Notes and City and County Warrants. Sells
Choice Lands and Lots on easy terms. Quote what you
have and write for information.
CORWIN D. MEAD, Pierre, S. D.
CHOICE FARMS $12 TO $20
W
HI'
to gn *t
P1KRRE, SOT!TH.n.lKAT.t
Ms#,
.. sb
ill?
And, if you get hind before the advance in prices!
you will have to hurry. Lands are certain to rise
in the immediate future. We buy desire farm.'
and sell at small advance in prico. Our advice is
BUY AHEAD OF THE BOOM.
STILL HERE
"Wnsix-i .Some busiinoss and dwelling
lots in Pie.mv •".u.voe loca! ion*. offoioJ choap.
Vi'SSt
TttTI
ST. CHARLES HOTEL
J. E. MILLER, Manager.
Largest and Best Hotel in South Dakota
Built upon a Modern Plan 244 Rooms
Strictly Fire Proof Rate $2.00 per Day, and up
CENTRALLY LOCATED
THE SCHUBERT
Paints, Oils, Glass. Brushes, Etc.
INDIAN CURIOS ..
SOUVENIR GOODS
PRESCRIPTIONS, A SPECIALTY
332 PIERRE STREET.
WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION IN EVERY LJNE
GARDEN SEEDS IN BULK OR PACKAGE.
.jsfe
in central South Dakota at prices that make it possible
for you to own a farm home. By purchasing from
us now you can take advantage of these
FLEETING OPPORTUNITIES
p-
,'v\ •, A
We have all tillable quarter section as low as $1,800.
We have resided here for years and Will go the
limit to please you in land selection.
JoQ/--«JoA
Cor. Pierre St. Sc Pleasant Drive. PIERRE, S. D.1
'V
IS THE BASIS OF ALL
WEALTH
'\u.. a imiiib- upon Govern
livif i'!\v iy sl.T win R:in:li .•
Historical soelety
1
PHARMACY
!,
Turkey seems to be hesitating be
tween the firii line and the bread
line.
The suffragetts will have auother
parade in Washington. Evidently
they do not consider the last one a
success.
The woman who wears the stylish
half hose and the stylish bobble
skirt will certainly attract some at
tention. .r
March will have to come through with
a lot of good behavior in the following
years to live down the evil reputation
it has earned this year.
President Wilson finally found a
publisher who could spare the time
and the money, aud had the inclina
tion to accept an ambassadorship.
We are wondering if the new buffa
lo nickel will be any harder to let
loose of than the old kind—especially
when the contribution box is passed
at church.
The democrats put over Col. J. Hum
Lewis for senator in Illinois, and they
did it in a clean way, too. Colonel
Bryan's flying vi11 to Illinois was not
without results
Iowa is another middle western state
that has arranged fpr a referendum
vote on suffrage. The senate has pass
ed the house bill for submission of a
franchise amendment.
Secretary of the War Garrison
urges strengthening of national guard,
creation of reserve, shorter enlist
ments and other expedients for bet
ter preparedness of war.
Rev. Irl Hicks, tlieSt. Louis weath
er men, an with truth say "I told
you so." IIicks'March weather pre
dictions came true throughout prac
tically the entire cojuntry.
Senator LaFollette says he is a re
publican. But he is not afraid to work
with President Wilson.for the welfare
of the people. This marks him as more
of a statesman than a politician.
When a nation over 90,000,000 goes
into committee of the whole on
stamping out flies and mosquitoes
the insect world will discover that
this country is beginning to think in
trillions. a.
The state of Washington has pas
sed a minimum wage bill, making
$1.25 a day the lowest permissable
wage for women employed in offices,
factories, laundries and other com
mercial enterprises.
Iroquois Chief: That Woodrow
Wilson will give the country a good
administration is the opinion of re
publicans as well as democrats.
There was not even a flutter in busi
ness circles when the administration
changed.
Colorado, Utah aud Oregon have
lately passed Mother's pension Dills.
The Utah law provides' that a mother
with children dependent on her shall
receive $10 per month toward the sup
port of the first child and $7 per
month for each additional child.
Those Sioux Falls Residents are hav
ing a real serious time in their efforts
to get another recall election going.
Time was, not so very long ago, wheh
a recall election was held at the Falls
every few weeks. Must be they are
retrograding down there on the banks
of the silvery Sioux.
PIERRE. SOUTH DAKOTA* THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 1913
*fe'
Joy has again come to the Indians of
the Dakotas as they are to soon receive
an issue of $1,000,000 for the purpose
of buying farm implements and ma
chinery. These issues surely ought to
put the Indians in a position to support
themselves, but we dare say many of
them are worse off for the issue. AA
The administration's statement sent
to our belligerent Southern neighbors
Bays
that "we can have no sympathy
with those who seek to seize the pow
er of government to advance their own
personal interest from which we sur
mise that a carbon copy will be for
warded to bull moose headquarters
The postmaster general has deter
mined that postmasters-entitled to
draw SI,000 a ye$r or mote mqst give
up' all other business. This is not/aa
the country editor, thinking of the
postofflcev as y| joppi^meot, would
bavts it. It remains toi be taid.'how
etter, tbat nearly alL prohibitlo^is in
BOOM w*y'etc«amveatad.vft^'
VI
fmm
THE WAY TO CITIZENSHIP
A new naturalization law is now in
•effect. Under i's provisions all per
sons who have «rnved since June 20,
1906, are required to furnish at the
time first papers are taken out, proof
of time ot arrival, wlrich paprr may
be taken' out regardless of time' of
residence A five year residence in
the United States unci at least one
year in the county is required before
application can be mad« for iiual
papers. Tw witnesses must be fur
nished who nave known him during
the entire length of residence. One
dollar must be paid when declaration
is made and four dollars when fiecond
paper is applied for. All applicants
for citizeuship must file their papers
before June 1, this year, and first
papers must accompany application.
MRD MIGRATION
The *rate at which some birds cau
migrate under favorable conditions
is extraordinary, and as one listens
to their plainU\..,' cries coming from
the darkness pverhead it is diHicult
to realize that in a lew hours these
same buds may be within the arctic
circle and little later be even
crossing the poie itself Less is
known of the actual dates of the de
parture of the migratory birds in au
tumn than of those of their arrival
earlier in the year, and this for ob
vious reasons. The way in which our
most charming songsters silently
skulk out ol the coui try in the au
tumn is very different from that in
which they make their triumphal
entry in the spring when every wood
and corpse resounds with their
melodies. :.
LIFESAVING AND KILLING
New York Tribune: Current figures
exemplify the paradox that the most
precious thing is the cheapest—in dol
lars and cents—and the most uselefs
thing is the dearest.
It will not be questioned that the
most profitable achievement is the sav
ing.of human life. It seems to be also
thilleast expensive. Dowtrat Panama
for example, Col. Gorgaa and his aids
have effected a wonderful saving of
human life by transforming what was
one of the highest death rates in the
world to.one of the lowest. The actual
cost of this work is accurately figured
out to be only $2 43 for each life saved.
On the other hand, in modern war
fare it costs an average of about $15,
000 to kill each man. In the Boer war
it cost nearly $40,000, and in the pres
ent Bolkan war, which has been waged
very economically, it ha cost probably
more than $10,000. Seeing that there
is nothing more wasteful thar. the de
struction of human lives, it would bi_ a
costly performance for the world if ii
were done without expense. At $15,
000 a head it is monstrously profligate.
Suppose that what is spent for ac
tually or
p»'ui,-.ial!y
destroying lives
were spent for saving them: What
might not be accomplished? Actuaries
estimate that $1,500,000,c^O is a con
servative estimate of the economic
value of lives which are lost needlessly
each year'in the United States alone.
To turn a part of war fund to the
saVing of 'hose lives a $2 43 apiece
might be iness.
COURT HAS PAROLE POWER1"
Sioux Falls Journal. The legisla
ture passed one good law that
should b£ the r: ans of keeping down
the population' of the penitentiary
in this state. The law gives the
judges of the circuit court the power
to suspend the sentences of people
convicted before them during their
good behavior. There in many a younj
man convicted of some criov* who
would be able to make a man of him
self but for the fact that he was com
pelled to serve a term in the peniten
tiary. Under this law the jutlge can
sentence the convicted man and then
parole him at once. At the present
time there are many young men in
the penitentiary who would be good
citizens if oat on parole, and this
new law will be the means of saviDg
many men.
DEATH OF MR. MORGAN
At half past'.9 o'clock Monday
morning, J. Pierpont Morgan died at
Rome. The opinion of Mr. Morgan's
physicians that his death was due to
the demand made upon him for testi
mony by the jPyjo investigating com
mitte of coqgrfess will not be serious
ly accept by'the "public.
There bave' bfeen fears that the hot
unexpected death of Mr. Morgan
would precipitate trouble in financial
circles when,lt came, but no serious
danger iMW'fM asserted itself^
MAN TAUGHT HUMILITY
Chicago Inter Ocean This is an age
when, as never before, man rejoices
in his strength—in his mastery of the
world about him. Aud he has rea
sous lor his pride.
He need fear no other living crea
ture, for he has made unto himseli
weapons with which he may over
come them all. He pierces moun
tains and liuks oceans. He spans the
Hoods aud harnesses their power. He
tears the thunderbolt from the hea
vens and compels it to bear his mes
sages over lands aud under seas and
through the viewless air. His inven
tions outrun the deer, dive with the
tishes in the waters and soar with the
buds above the clouds.
Is not man is very deed the lord ol
creation!
Theu thereccomes a day when a
black cloud appears on the horizon
and sweeps dowu upon his towns and
cities. Aud the hovels of the poor
and the mansions of the rich, with
the palaces of trade aud the temples
oi worship, are toppled into impartial
iuin. Their tenauts are fortunate it
the very devices witn which man has
ftiged the light ol the sun aud made
it to shine for him at midnight add
uot to the perils of tempest the
horrors or tire.
Or wheu alter heavier snows than
usual come heavier rains and a hot
ter sun. And all the floods are out,
thousands are homeless and hundreds
drown in their homes like trapped
rats. The very works with which
man has imagined that he has re
strained ana controlled the waters
butaad to his dangers, his sufferings
and his slaughter.
And man can do little o^nothing to
arrest the destruction. He can but
try to save bis bare life, wait until
the elemental forces of which he vain
ly boasted the mastefly have liniphtd
their sport with him and his works,
aud then bury bis dead, house bis
homeless and painfully rebuild what
nas been swept down aud tossed
away.
Is not man in very deed the sport
aud mockery of creation!
At such times man, if he read
aright the lessons of fear, of suffer
ing and of death, learns humility.
Whether his faith be only in the laws
of nature or look through aud beyond
these to nature's God, he learns how
inliuitely feeble, with all its poten
cies, is his strength compared with
the overruling force about and above
him, and how limited bis mind, with
all its achievements, compared with
the infinite mind that gives laws to
all the rouudless universe through
unending time.
A SERIOUS MISTAKE
Mitchell Republican: The Repub
lican hopes that it is wrong in its
opinion that the state tax commis
sion made a serious mistake in taking
the lid off of the various tax levies iu
the state aud in instructing the as
sessors to enforce double taxation of
mortgages. For we don't want to
see any sort of calamity come upon
the people of South Dakota. The
order of the commission has been
given. By it's fruits it shall be
judged.
The calendar of cases for tjhe April
term of the supreme court is
out, show
ing seventy-three, cases on call. Tues
day was given over to examination of
applicants for admission to the bar*
and yesterday was motion day for all
cases on the calendar.
FOURTH CLASS POSTMASTERS
The speculation in reference to the
civil service status of the fourth
a'.ass postmasters of, the country,
seems to have beeh brought down to
an .understandable basis by a state
ment of the Postmaster General, who
says that examinations will be held
throughout the country that will fur
nisb true tests of the applicants abil
ity, "Many of these who hold posi
tions as fourth class postmasters,"
said Mr. Burleson, "secured them as
a result of pernicious political activ
ity. The Postoflice Department should
be a business institution, run on
scientific business lines. I intended
to use the weight of my influence to
make it such."
llv ?AN INDIAN PAPER
The Stamford Standard, published
in the southwestern part of Stanley
county, is-now under the uianage
ment of jQhn
A.
Kunsclose. a full
blood Sioux Indian, and is the only
paper of general circulation In the
state managed exclusively by an In
dian., He is getting out good local
paper, and making a record lor
soil inthat section*
Huronite: Secretary Bryan, con
versing with a South Dakota demo
crat at Lincoln, said the action of
lie courts of South Dakota made it
clear that all the political committees
of the state were dead beyond resur
rection. "But", added Mr. Bryan,
"I have learned that the people up
there are very much alive."
The courts and the attorney gener
al and the machine may be able to
assassinate committees, but they are
not equal to a general massacre of
the rights of the inhabitants.
The people of the state are how go
ing over the heads of organizations
aud combinations aud appealing to
President Wilson to stand by them in
their effort to secure recognition
apart from the influence of, political
machines,
The president, being of a liberal
turn of mind, is likely to interest
himself in their behalf and Secretary
Bryan will not be blind to the cause
of the live people, instead of that of
the judicially dead committees.
THE VICE PRESIDENT
Washington Times: The Hon.Thos.
R. Marshall, vice president of the
United States, and—what is more to
the point aud to his eminence—a
member of the literary club of Indian
apolis—is demonstrating himself one
of the most engaging of our off hand,
ready to wear talkers. It's a bad
day that gets by without the vice
president making a speech, and it's a
rare speech that he passes out with
out some gems of bard Hoosier sense
in it.
THE BLUE AND THE GRAY
It, is in commemoration of this
battle of Gettysburg now recorded in
history as one of the sixteen great
battles of the world, tbat the fiftieth
anniversary is to be celebrated next
July on the battlefield itself in Penn
sylvania. It will not be'the celebra
tion of a war victory, but rather that
of peace. The men of both'fUdee will
meet as brothers, will claBp hands
and, with all enmity and hatted.
ished from their hearts, will pledge
renewed fealty to the nation's em
blem. It will, without doubt, be the
lust gathering of the Blue and the
Gray upon that battlefield, and with
this in mind, the United States gov
ernment is engaged iu making
pre­&
parations for the great celebration,
while all the states in the union are
formulating plans to send to the cele
bration, as their guests of honor, the
veterans of that battle who now re
side witbin their borders.
The commission appointed by Gov.
Byrne are endeavoring to get in touch
with every veteran of the Gettysburg
battle now residing in this state and
have succeeded in reaching 116. Only
such veterans as fought at Gettys
burg will have their expenses paid
by the state.
CONDUCTORS OF INSTITUTES
State Superintendent Lawrence
has
selected the following list of institute
conductors for the work of the present
year: J. W. Ault, Bryant W. H. H.
Beadle, Madison Mrs. Edith Beaumont,
Madison J. E. Beckler, Fort Pierre D.
H. Root, Canton A. A. Bringham,
Brooking L. E. Cam field.
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NO. 4S
NOT ALL DEAD YET
1
-Wf
m,
Academy
G. A. Clark, Yankton F. L. Cook,
Spearfish W. E. Deyo, Elk* Point U,
S Earls, Dell Rapids E. M. Everhart,
Tyndall C. H. French, Huron W. W.
Girton, Madison J. W. Goff, Madison
L\ A. Harmon, Yankton J. W. Hes
ton, Madison C. W. Hochstetler, Hur
on R. B. Irons, Rapid City H. C.
Johnson, Aberdeen W. E. Johnson,
Aberdeen J. Jones, jr., Faulkton W,
F. Jones, Vermillion E. H. Kahl, Mel
lette M. A. Lange, Rapid City J. C.
Lindsey, Mitchell C. H. Lugg, Parks
ton J. yV. McOlinton Mitchell A. A.
McDonald, Sioux Falls S. T. May,
Madison H. W. Mayne, Winner E. J.
Morgan, Custer G. W. Nash,. Aber
L. B. Parsons, Watertown E. C. Peri
sho, Vermillion Mrs. Grace R. Porter,
Ft. Pierre M. M. Ramer, Pierre J. 3^.
Rodheaver, Brookings Theodore Saatn
Lead F. F. Schaeffer, Lahgford G. J.
Schellenger, Selby Gr, H. Scott, Yank
ton A. H. Seymour, Volga W. F*
Sloan, Camp Crook: F. W, Smith, Ab
erdeen G. M. Smith, Vermillion P. B.
Steece. Wessington Springs L. A.
Stout, Mitchell Alexander Strachan,
Dead wood W. A. Thompson, Clark
W. R. Van Walker, MiUer Samuel
Weir, Mitchell G. G, Wenslaff, Spring
field J. W. Whiting, Asbton .R Q,
Woodburn, Aberdeen.
A number of tbese condaeUtrs heldi-s
meeting here Tuesday to consider edu*
cational matters of the stat«, wpeeial
ly In relation to U^teMkbuttt^.
dates fw eoooty ioeUtateeHU not
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