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Pierre weekly free press. (Pierre, S.D.) 1889-19??, April 24, 1913, Image 1

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VOL. XXIX
A
"i
A N
m.
1
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--y lots
HAPPY HOME REAL ESTATE
PIERRE, SOUTH DAKOTA.
Coe. Pierre ST
and Iron Tablets
TONIC AND DIGESTIVE*
Digest what Yoit Ftat. Make Rich Red Blood.
YOU FEEL STRONGER EVERY DAY
At 11 Druggists or by Mail, Postpaid
300 Pet Box
H. M. STRAIGHT & CO.
PIERRE SOUTH DAKOTA
PIERRE 1882 STILL HERE
CORWIN D. MEAD
Real Estate and Mortgage Lpans
Buys Notes and City and County Warrants, Sells
Choice Lands and Lots on easy terms. Quote what you
have and write for information,
.. 1 11 in 1111111

CORWIN D. MEAD, Pierre, S. D.
IS THE BASIS OF ALLi
WEALTH
—1
And, if you get laud before the advance in prices
you will have to hurry. Lands are certain to rise
in the immediate futufre. We buy desire farms
and sell at small advance in price. Our advice is
BUY AHEAD OF THE BOOM
I CHOICE FARMS $12 TO $20
"We can locate a limited a number upon Govern-
menf homosteads, near railway station. Ranches
to go 11 a bargain. Some business and
in Pierre, choice locations, offeiel cheap.-,
AGENCY
'l II II II It II I fl"l-r-l 1 I lifl I MM n"
ST. CHARLES HOTEL
J. E. MILLER, Manager.
Largest and, Best Hptel in South Dakota
Built upon a Modern Plan 244 Rooms
Strictly Fire Proof Rate $2.00 per Day, and up
CENTRALLY LOCATED
THE SCHUBERT PHARMACY
Paints, Oils, Glass* Brushes, Etc.
INDIAN CURIOS
A N
SOUVENIR GOODS
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
332 PIERRE STREET.
WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION IN EVERY LINE
GARDEN SEEDS IN BULK OR PACKAGE.
in central South Dakota at price* that make it possible
for you town a farm hame. By purchasing from
us now you can take advantage of these
FLEETING OPPORTUNITIES
We have .all tillable quarter section as low as $1,800.
We have resided here for years and will go the
.limit to please you in land selection.
-.s'~ -i -0 V:. '.i
dwell
in?
1
1
-7
1
J. J. DALTON,
Sl Pleasaikt Driv& PIERRE, S. D.
The schoolboy is watching the cal
endar with extraordinary interest
these days.
What is more pleasant than to be
awakened in the morning bv the
music of a tree ful of robins?
The baseball season is now wide open
and has crowded the Bulkan war and
the Mexican revolution off the boards.
The tariff situation is said to be a
matter of worry to other nations.
Haven't they any troubles of their
own?.
"The privilege of association with
the president ought to rai6e the rat
ing of congressmen," says the Sibley
Tribuhe.
Governor Byrne returned to Pierre
on Saturday from the eastern part of
the state. While absent from the city
he did some boss trading.
October 5, 1913, is the date fixed for
the floating of the first ship through
the Panama canal. This will be in
the nature of a private rehearsal,
however.
Down in St. Louis a girl has attended
church 4,723 times in the last 26 years,
and has walked 18,918 miles on her way
to worship. It's too late for us to try
to beat that record.
Brookings Press: The real optimist
must be the fellow who can make
himself see nice things about inside
work in the springtime, when all na
ture beckons him to come out in the
open.
Dr. Friedmann appears to be gaiu
ing confidence of the public. He is
now selling the invention that he feels
assured will cure tuberculosis and no
objections are being made by those
who originally opposed his claims.
From the California viewpoint the
Japs are acting foolishly in getting
excited over the a&tialien law. From
the Japanese viewpoint the Califor
nians are foolish to get excited over
the ownership of land by aliens.—
Citv Journal.
In the ranks of the Modern Wood
men of America order there is discord
and a factional strife has reached
such a climax that a meeting has
been called at Mitchell for all Wood
men of South Dakota who are^oppos
ed to the action of the Chicago Head
Camp.
The population of South Dakota is
growing at the rate of 8,000 a year
along natural lines, the births ex
ceeding the deaths annually by that
number. In ten years the natural in
crease in the population would thus
be 80,000 and twice that number ought
to be added by immigration."?»
William J. Bryan and Senator R. M.
LaFollette are both rejoicing over the
winning of the fight for direct election
of U. S. senators. It took forty years
of agitation to get this popular measure
enacted into law. The voters will no
longer stand for interference with their
rights by a handful of plutocratB.
Tbe house democrats finished the
tariff caucus Saturday, giving final
approval to the Underwood biil. The
details of tbe income tax were gone
over. As the bill now stands, death
or maturity claims on insurance poli
cies will not be taxed upon payment
to the beneficiaries, but future in
comes from such proceeds may be
taxed.
1
The secretary of the interior on last
Friday approved an order of the com
missioner of the general land office
granting to persons who filed on land in
Mellette and Bennett counties, in this
state, and whose six months' time with
in which to begin residence has expired
or about to ezpire, an extension until
May 15 of the time Within which to be
gin residence.
By the commissioner appointed by
the supreme court of the state of Mis
souri, it has been decided that Wilson
R. Nelson of the Kansas City Star,
was found not guilty of contempt of
Judge Joseph A. Guthrie, although
the judge so charged a^d inflicted a
penalty of one day in jail. The su
prenfe court's commissioner will be
heard in court on the 1st of May and
tbe court will then give its cot^clu
8ions in the case. Tbe commissioner
says the statement published by Mr
Nelson was true and was( merely a re
pptt of a cas* tried in tbe c^urt over
which Judge Gnthtte gmVha.
PIERRE. SOUTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY. APRIL 24, 1913
STATE ROAD FUND
IN GREAT DEMAND
The small amount of state aid for
highways, which is available appears
to be in
Btrong
A
demand, even though
it is not available until after July 1.
The appropriation is only $7,500 a
year, and
to
apply
on
the
highway work
where state lands are involved, but
already applications have come in
Marshall, Edmunds and Meade coun
ties for a share of this fund, and be
fore it becomes available the whole
of
amount will likely be request­
ed from some of the counties with a
large amount of state lands.
inCE PRIZE HUNG UP
A gold'medal to the school boy or girl
between^ the ages of 10 and 15 who
writes the best composition, not to ex
ceed 800 words, on the repair and main
tenance of earth roads, is to be awarded
by Logag Waller Page, director, Office
of Public Roads, United States Depart
ment of Agriculture, Washington,
C. All compositions must be submitted
to Mr. Page before May 15, 1913, and
the medal will be awarded as soon there
after as the compositions can be grad
ed. The composition may be based on
knowledge gained from books or other
sources, but no quotations should be
made.
Ang child between the ages mention
ed, attending a country school, may
compete. Only one side of the paper
must be written on each page should
be numbered the name, age and ad
dress of the writer, and the name and
location of the school which he or she
is attending must be plainly written at
the top of the first page. The announce
ment of the competition has been sent
to superintendents of schools in the
rnral districts. No further information,
can be obtained from the office of pub
lic roads. This announcement should
be plain'to everyone, and all children
will~thus start on a basis of equality.
WHERE, INDEED?
Greenville (Illinois), republican
nome-the night of the election
went home-the night of the election
and woke up his wife and told to pack
up and get ready to leave—that Il
linois bad gone democratic and lie
wouldn't live in such a state. And
storming around for a time be went
out to get some more election news,
and later returned home and told his
frife that she needn't mind about
packing up, that there was no place
to go to.—Argonaut
ALFALFA ON EVERY FARM
Pr®f. Hanson, of the State Agricul
tural college, would (ike to see at least
five or ten acres of alfalfa upon every
farm in South Dakota. Alfalfa will
mean more to the land and to the farm
home home than any other one crop. It
is permanent and will yield wonderful
returns if some attention is given to the
seed bed preparation. Ail that is ec
essary to get a stand of alfalfa is to
pend some time and pains in preparing
the land and in getting the seed that
has been grown in the north and west.
THE PUBLIC LANDS
Indian affairs and public lands are
always of first importance in the legis
lative program of many states, and a
great many bills have bee'n introduced
in congress looking to better laws.
Morgan of Oklahoma and Martin of
South Dakota are the sponsors for a
number of meritorious measures that
came before congress on the opening
days.
LAID WASTE
BY
II:-
FLAMES
The state land commissioner has
just received a report from State For
est Supervisor Roskie, giving a sum
mary of the forest Ore in the hills
laBt week, as it affected tbe state for
est reserve. He states that an area
of ten miles square was burned over
mostly in tbe Custer forest, being an
area of about 600 acres.
WINTER RYE MAKES GROWTH
The question of winter rye' waa given
a practical test as to its ability to get
through a winter in this part ot the
state, at the Wadleigh ranch north of
this city. A field of twenty acres was
sown last fall, and while it got a start
therswas not enough growth to hole
any snow even if it had fallen, and none
came until after the first of March
This field stood a- test of about sixteen
degrees beloir zero with absolutely no
protection, and the stools on even the
highest, tnbfet exposed points in the field
are starting in good shape this spring,
With such a test it is practically certain
that winlerryecan be depended upon
to grow hstMajaitof the
WILL INSPECT PROPOSED
IRRIGATION CANAL ROUTE
Dan Bier wagon, the main pusher
for the irrigation project for the south
branch of Cheyenne river, will this
week with State Engineer Deer, make
a trip over the proposed route on the
canal from the proposed point of tak
ing water from the Cheyenne river, to
the location of tne resrvoir in tbe bad
lands near Wall. They will probably
be out for a week, and cover the ter
ritory in Washington, Pennington
and Fall River counties. This pro
ject is fully as large as the Belle
Fourche project put in by the govern
ment, and will mean covering a large
section of country if it is carried
through, it will be in fact more ex
pensive than the Belle Fourche pro
ject as it comprehends carrying the
water for many miles and getting out
onto the high prairie Instead of cov
ering principally valley lands.
ONE LINE TO BE BUILT
From all that can be learned as to
the railway situation in South Dako
ta this year, it is a case of "your
move" all along the line. Each of
the old established companies watch
ing the others, and if any one of them
should make a move encroaching up
on the territory of another, that
would put them all under way in a
hurry, and there would be some such
revival of railway building as that of
seven years ago, which put fnto exist
ence, a lot of new mileage west of the
Missouri river. But if none of the
oid companies see St to make a start
there will be little flnew mileage in
South Dakota this year. About the
only apparent activity in construction
is the proposed Veblen and Fairmont
road from Veblen_in this state to
Fairmont, N. D., which is purely aJ
farmers line. Tbe promoter back of
this being Julius Rosholt of Minne
apolis, who claims that work on ac
tual construction will begin within
three weeks, be being allowed, $300,
000 of first mortgage bonds while the
farmers along the line take up $150,
000 of second mortgage bonds, which
fund is claimed to be sufficient to
construct the line. This is tbe out
growth of the efforts of the farmers
in the vicinity of Veblen in their
years of effort to secure better rail
way facilities for their section of the
state.
T. R.'s NEW ISSUE
Chicago Inter Ocean: Now that
the tariff fight has practically put the
bull choose out of business, .Col.
Roosevelt is preparing to go before
the country on a platform of^a 2-cent
lunch for school children.
A DEFINITE POLICY
The Chicago Record-Herald, a re
publican paper, in discussing tfie
president's message, pays this high
compliment to the president: "Even
the opponents (of the measure, or of
the arguments advanced in its favor,
will candidly admit, howeyer, that
the president and his party are en
deavoring to redeem their pledges, to
relieve the consumer, to open new
channels to industry and commerce,
and to promote national prosperity
There may be room for amendments
and compromises no rate is to be
considered final: a full and searching
discussion of the bill is assured. The
administration will not wabble it
knows wnat it wants and will accept
responsibility for the consequences
of its policies but it will welcome
light and honest data from those who
regard tbe proposed reductions as too
radical."
RIGHT FOR ONCE
Kansas City Star: In^handing in
his resignation, apparently Chief
Moore, of the weather bureau, prog
nosticated the coming storm cor
rectly.
THE BEST LIVE
Ida Grove Era: Some 1200 or 1500
nawspapers were started in this coun
try last year, and about the same num
ber died. It is not so easy to establish
a paper as it was in "the early days,"
when a font or two of type, a second
hand Washington press, a hand roller
and a book for subscriptions were sufii
cient and ould be purchased for from
$150 to $250. It requires money
.to es
tablish a paper in these days and a lot
of money to keep it going after it is
started. But the need of the country
is not more newspapers, but bettor ones
—and the fewer they are in number the
latter thqrai*
fssis-i
NO. 51
GOING TO GETTYSBURG
Arrangements Completed To Run a
Train to That City.
The South Dakota commission ap
pointed to arrange for the representa
tion of this state at the celebration of
the fiftieth anniversary of the battle of
Gettysburg, in July, have made tbe
arrangements in connection with the
transportation.
The routing of tiie trip was taken up
with the view of making it the most at
tractive possible, with the highest de
grej of comfort. The committee haa
in mind to take into the city of Get
tysburg the best train of the many that
will go from every part of the country.
Secretary Kingman states that the
application of 129 veterans who were
participants of the battle Of Gettys
burg have been accepted, which togeth
er with the governor, the commission,
and with the soldiers who pay their own
expenses, will make a company of about
250 in sight for the trip. Some of these
who now plan to go will be unable to
attend, but others will take their place,
and the list will grow.
The official route selected for the
old soldiers from South Dakota to
the Gettysburg celebration in'July, ia
over the Chicago and St, Paul road to
Chicago starting from Mitchell then
ove*r the Pennsylvania line to Harris
burg, Peon., and over the western
Maryland line from there to Gettys
burg. I
A handsome and distinctive
been designed to be worn
badge
haa
by
diers. On the pin plate will
the sol­
be
the
name and regiment of the wearer, andv
suspended from this by a red, white and
blue ribbon is a medallion in colors\
showing a soldier of the blue and
soldier of the grey clasped hands over a
cannon, with inscriptions giving' the
date of the bottle, the year of the cele
bration, and the wordB, "Fiftieth An
niversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.''
The South Dakota Commission's plan 1
to have a finely equipped train will
meet with the approval of everyone in„Vr:
the. state. Everyone has been interatt*^^
ed in this trip thus far from a purely
unselfish standpoint. They are pleased
to have the old soldiers get this pleas-,, .,
ant recognition. They will have apaddf 7
ed interest now that tyey know the trip
will be made in good "advertising
style" as well as in comfort.
CALL THE LEGISLATURE
A new dance has sprung up which
is called the '^eurthmy" one tbe ao-v
Ions of the state overlooked, and wili^
probably prove popular as it has the
tango, bunny hug and grizzly bear
backed off the board. Sounds like a'v
new cure for lumbago.—Mobridge
News.
McREYNOLDS' FIRM STAND
The tried agents of some of the
trust have sounded President Wil
son's attorney upon his attitude on
tbe Sherman anti-trust law and nowff,i
they are having the fear of the un-
righteous. McReynolids stated to
them that a corporation cannot com
mit a crime, that the crime if any is
committed by the officers who directs
the affairs of the corporation. For a
long lime it has been tbe custom of
trusts to hide behind the corporate
name and let the company take the
blamii and pay a fine, if need be, and
then tax the public just a little more
extra than the fine amounted to and
thus be some ahead of the game all ,.
the time. But, if the new attorney 7
general insists upon his theory of the
law, tbe managing officers of the'
trusts will be in the limelight, just aa
were the officers of the NationalCash
Register company, who were recently
given terms in prison for violating,
a a a
cedure will do more to prevent the
trusts than all the fines that have ever-.
been assessed the courts.
GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP
Washington,, D. C., April 19.—within
a few days Secretary of the Interior
Lane is expected'to complete his report
on the latest railroad construction? bill
for Alaska. It is expected that .be will
approve the measure. If ,it does,
will |then be taken up by- the senatoi' v''
committee on territories whose
bers are favorably to the-me&sure iuidv
reported. Its passage at the praa^o^
or next session of congreas is now
garded sb assured.
This legislation will ^present nev.,
departure for the
Itmeansgevernjnentc(wst^tiio«i,r
ership and opeiitkn og a giesj^i
ayatom for Alaaluit
the"'
v,"
iM

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