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The Yale expositor. (Yale, St. Clair County, Mich.) 1894-current, August 31, 1911, Image 7

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THE YALE EXPOSITOR, THURSDAY, AUG. 31, 191 T.
1
M OF GITY
Big Success Shown by Numbers
of Callers at Philadelphia
Headquarters.
LOCAL MAN TELLS OF
REMARKABLE RELIEF
FROM RHEUMATISM
IN YEAR'S TIME.
The apparent success with which Fro
feasor James M. Munyon, the world
famous health authority, has been meet
ing has started much discussion. Every
street car brings dozens of callers to hla
laboratories at C2d and Jefferson Streets.
Philadelphia. Ta.. and every mall brings
thousands of letters from peoplo Inquir
ing about Munyon's Famous Health Cult.
Professor Munyon's corps of expert phy
sicians Is kept busy eee.Injr cnllers and
answering the mail. Peculiar to say,
these physicians prescribe no medicine
at all for SO per cent, of tho cnllers and
mall Inquiries; health hints, health ad
vice nnd rules for rieht living are given
absolutely free. Medical advice- and con
sultation absolutely free.
ifunyon's followers seem to be enor
mous. Those who believe In his theories
peem to think he possesses tho most
marvelous powers for the heallnj? of ull
sorts of diseases. Munyon, himself,
laughs at this. He snys: "The hundreds
of cures which you are hearing about
every clay In Philadelphia are not in any
way due to my personal skill. It is my
remedies, which represent the combined
brains of the greatest medical specialists
science has ever known, that are doing
the work. I have paid thousands of dol
lars for a single formula and the ex
clusive right to manufacture It. 1 have
paid tens of thousands of dollars for oth
ers of my various forms of treatment.
This Is why I pet such remarkable re
sults. I have simply bought tho best
products of the best brains In the world
and placed this knowledge within tho
reach of the general public."
Among Munyon's callers yesterday
were many who were enthusiastic In
their praise of the man. Oirr of theso
said: "For six years I suffered with
rheumatism. Mv arms nnd legs were af
flicted so badly that I could hardly work,
and I could not raise my arms to my
head. The pain was most severe In tho
liack, however, and I was In perfect tor
ture. I tried in many ways to get cured,
or even to secure temporary relief, but
nothing seemed to help me until I was
persuaded by a friend to try Dr. Mun
yon's Uric Acid Course. It was the most
marvelously acting remedy I ever saw.
within a week the pain had most gone
and Inside of a month I considered my
self entirely cured. I can now go out in
the worst weather cold, wet or any
thing else, and I have not felt any sus
picion of a return of the disease. I think
that every person who has rheumatism
and does not take the TTrlc Acid Course
Is making a great mistake."
The continuous stream of callers and
mall that comes to Professor James M.
Miinvon at his laboratories at 53d and
Jefferson Sts.. Philadelphia. Pa., keeps
Dr. Munyon and his enormous corps of
expert physicians busy.
Write today to Professor James M.
Munvon personally. Munyon's Labora
tories. B3d and Jefferson Sts., Philadel
phia, Pa. Give full particulars in refer
ence to your case. Your inquiry will be
held strictlv confidential and answered in
a plain envelope. You will be given the
best medical advice, and asked moro
questions. Remember there is no charge
of any kind for consultation, or medical
advice. The onlv charge Munyon makes
Is. when his physicians prescribe his
remedies vou pay the retail selling price.
It is immaterial whether you buy from
him or from the nearest druggist.
Emerson's Story of Gratitude.
There is a beautiful little story In
Emerson's recently published "Jour
nals," of which his son, the editor,
Dr. Edward W. Emerson, said the poet
was very proud.
A certain widow was so poor that
the eked out the one thin bed cover
ing by laying an old door over herself
and her children.
"Mamma," one of the children said
one bitter night, "what do those poor
little children do who haven't got a
door to cover them?" Youth's Com.
panion.
' Was He a Bostonian?
"John," shrieked a woman, "don't
go under that ladder." .
But under it John went with a
swoop to the pavement.
"My dear," he said, coming up with
a dollar bill in his hand, "if I hadn't
gone under the ladder that boy would
have beaten me to the currency."
His Inspiration.
Wagner told where he got his inspi
ration. "It was from the garbage cans be
ing emptied at night," ho confessed.
Mrs. Wlnslow's SootMng fiyrup for Children
teething, softens the puma, reduces in 11 anima
tion, allays pain, cures wind colic, 25c a bottle.
Calling people down is not a very
uplifting process.
Particularly the Ladies.
Not only pleasant and refreshing to
the taste, but gently cleansing and sweet
ening to the system, Syrup of Figs and
Elixir of Senna 13 particularly adapted
to ladies and children, and beneficial in
all cases in which a wholesome, strength
ening and effective laxative should be
used. It is perfectly safe at all times and
dispels colds, headaches and the pains
caused by indigestion and constipation so
promptly and effectively that it is the one
perfect family laxative which gives satis
faction to all and is recommended by
millions of families who have used it and
who have personal knowledge cf its ex
cellence. Its wonderful popularity, however, has
led unscrupulous dealers to offer imita
tions which act unsatisfactorily. There
fore, when buying, to get its beneficial
effects, always note the full name of the
Company California Fig Syrup Co.
plainly printed on the front of every
package of the genuine Syrup of Figs
and Elixir of Senna.
For sale by all leading druggists. Price
50 cents per bottle.
PAKKEK'S
UAin IIAI CAM
nrtin u w n
CiMi and ttf-iiritificf tha Iiir.
f'roir)oti a Iniuriai.t ffwth.
iwr Fall t Jientore Oray
Cuxrl '!p d'trnrr to htir faliirj,'.
i'lr. ii 1 i.f l-t7r)rt
AUTOMOBILE
$yL AIF V '"I
THREE VIEWS OF "WILD" BOB
AUTO
This is the roan who has traveled
through space faster than any human
being ever traveled before and lived.
He has dared to do something that
no other mortal ever accomplished be
fore, and through his daring has gain
ed the title of the "World's Speed
King." Robert Burman is shown here
at the wheel of the monster IJenz car
which he will pilot in the Michigan
State Fair auto races. Burman is the
holder of the world's straightaway
records for the kilometer, mile and
RACING PROGRAM IS
BEST EVER OFFERED
Grand Circuit Dates for State Fair
Will Bring Together Fastest
' Horses In World.
No fair organization in the country
has ever presented so elaborate and
so expensive a program for harness
events as that of the Grand Circuit
Meeting for the Michigan State Fair
this year. The purses aggregate
$53,000.
Patrons of the Michigan State Fair
will be treated to the highest class of
horse racing in the world this year,
as the management has secured dates
in the Grand Circuit. This means
that all the fastest horses in the
world and all the famous drivers will
participate in the big events that will
he raced during the first week of the
fair.
The stellar feature of attraction
will be the great Michigan Stake,
worth $10,000. The list of entries al
ready secured guarantees a wonder
ful contest that sheaild prove one of
the great races of the year. There is
also a $5,000 pacing race and class
raes for all the Grand Circuit horses.
In recognition of Michigan as a
center of horse breeding, the Ameri
can Association of Trotting Horse
Breeders has decided to award to the
Michigan State Fair its matron stake,
one of the great colt races of the
trotting turf.
The arrangement of the card show
ing the future events of each day is
not completed, and when it is pub
lished there will be five days of Grand
Circuit races that will furnish some
of the turf history of the season of
1911. '
A LIVE STOCK SHOW
CF THE HIGHEST ORDER
Every animal at the State Fair will
1)0 the pick of the farm, selected for
Mr? purpose of competing for a pre
mium and the excellence of the show
will be fully equal to its magnitude.
The people will not only have an op
portunity to see the nnimala but to
-irccrtaln their characteristics, and to
lonrn the la'e and improved methods
of tearing, fording nnd caring for all
kinds cf lhe stock. The State Fair
offers unexampled opportunities for
rule and purdiat'.e of live stock, and
buyers, as well as sellers, are cordial
ly inited to attend and take advant
age of this opportunity.
NO LIQUOR ON GROUNDS.
Its Sale Is Positively Prohibited by
the State Fair Management.
The sale of liquor of any kind or
description anywhere on the grounds
is positively prohibited by the state
fair management. For a number of
years a bar was conducted under the
urand stand, but last, year the hoard
)U -pled n resolution; declaring against
he liquor concession and tho resolu
tion will be rigidly enforced again
tli I -3 year.
SPEED KING OF
BURMAN, WHO WILL BE AT THE MICHIGAN STATE FAIR
RACES WITH HIS BIO BENZ CAR.
two-mile distances, and during the
past Ave years has left behind him a
trail of records broken and victories
won. Burman is one of the most pe
culiarly constituted men in the world
today, living what might be called a
dual existence. In everyday life be
is quiet and unassuming and a thor
ough business man, but behind the
wheel cf a racing motor a ninnis
seems to seize him and Burman be
comes a mau semi-frenzied in his de
sire to conquer time and set space at
HOW FELICIA SHOWED HER.
When Mrs. Slidell. who lived across
the street from tho Trentons and had
two marriageable daughters of her
own, learned that young Dr. Baldwin
was devoting himself assiduously to
Felicia Trenton it troubled her.
"Felicia is a good girl in many
ways," she said confidentially to half
a dozen of her most intimate friends,
"but she is certainly not the girl for
a struggling young physician to mar
ry. While she has the appearance of
being a good manager and all that,
and everybody knows that she simply
runs things at home, it seems to me
that it's more a sign of bad temper
than anything else. That poor little
mother of hers just gives in to her
because si; knows there would be a
tremendous fuss if she didn't. Of
course, she seems to have so much
attention from men. but you'll notice
that none of them keep it up very
long.
"You remember Tom Hays, don't
you?" continued Mrs. Slidell, warming
to her theme. "Of course, some peo
ple say to this day that he was des
perately in love with Felicia, but to
my own personal knowledge he never
went near her the last time he was in
town, and. in fact, I undestood from
the very best authority that this was
because she had a Jar of rouge sitting
on the mantel one night when he
went, there.
"Then there was George Gleason.
George did go there a great deal and
seemed perfectly devoted, but I know
that they were almost engaged and
one morning he went there unexpect
edly. She had been doing some wcrk
around the house and had an a kimo
no and dreadful old slippers and her
hair up in curl papers, and all that
rort of thing, and George just turned
around and went away and never
went back again." VJ
It was odd, and of course very un
fortunate that Mrs. Slidell should
have been taken so ill as to require
the services of a physician Just at the
time when her own family doctor was
out of town. Felicia Trenton laughed
when she happened to look out of the
window and see the doctor going up
the Slidell front steps to make a pro
fessional call. She laughed again
when she met him at her own door.
"What's the Joke?" asked the doc
tor. "What did she say about mo?" she
asked.
"Who" the doctor began. Then
he, too, laughed. "Conceited young
woman," he said; "what makes yoii
thing she said anything about you?"
"Precedent," responded Felicia
lightly.
SPLENDID MUSIC.
State Fair Crowds Will Be Enter
tained by Two Great Bands.
Schmemann's Military Band and
Al. Green's Military Band, both high
class musical organizations, will fur
nish the band music at tho state fair
this year. There will be daily con
certs from tho stand located in the
grove and one of tho bands will be
in constant attendance in tho grand
stand.
Some people think they are, guests,
but others find them jests.
THE WORLD.
naught. Unlike former drivers who
have reached the pinnacle of farao in
the world of speed, Burman refuses to
retire from hard fought competition
with others and relies tipon exhibi
tions of his skill to increase his fame.
Traveling through space at the rate
of almost two and one-half miles a
minute is not conducive to the best of
complexions, so the speed king has
devised the unique mask shown above
to protect his face during his thrill
ing drives in his monster Benz car.
It was some weeks later that Feli
cia met Mrs. Slidell just coming out
of Dr. Baldwin's office. Mrs. Slidell
seized Felicia's hand in an affection
ate grasp.
"I understand that you're a great
friend of Dr. Iialdwin's," she gurgled.
"You know I dread having a new phy
sician, so I was simply distressed to
death when I was taken so ill when
Dr. Toole was out of town. But I've
simply fallen in love with your Dr.
Baldwin."
"Oh, please don't call him my Dr.
Baldwin's protested Felicia. "I really
know him very slightly. He didn't
make much of an impression on me
when I met him."
"Is that possible?" cried Mrs. Sli
dell. "Why, my girls consider him
perfectly charming. You know he has
dined with us several times, and just
between you and me he's very much
taken with Isabel. You know Isabel
is so natural and unaffected, and Dr.
Baldwin tells me that he particularly
dislikes artificiality."
"He'll never like me, then." said
Felicia. "Let me hurry up and get
away, so that there won't bo any pos
sibility of his seeing mo. One of my
eyebrows is on crooked right this
minute." She hurried away with a
laugh. "Cat," she said to herself.
"I'll show her.".
Fortune favored Felicia, for a few
days later, just as she was stepping
out of Dr. Baldwin's small, but very
correct, little motor car, assisted by
the doctor's devoted hand, Mrs. Sli
dell came trimming lightly, lovingly
toward them. "Shall I tell her?" mur
mured the doctor. Felicia nodded.
"You darling," cooed Mrs. Slidell,
as she stopped beside tho two. "How
lovely you look, and such a beautiful
color! And how becoming that style
of hair dressing is to you," she gush
ed on. "You don't know how often
I've envied you your lovely color and
your beautiful heavy hair!"
Felicia patted her curls approving
ly. "They are rather nice, aren't
they?" she inquired. "But you can
have plenty if you want to pay for it.
To tell you the truth, though, I'm get
ting a little bit tired of the hair I
have now. Dr. Baldwin is going to
New York next week and he's going
to get me $30 worth of new hair nnd
the latest thing In complexions. Per
haps he would fill a commission for
you. too. You would, wouldn't you,
John?"
"Gladly if I have time after getting
the all-Important solitaire," respond
ed the doctor cordially. "I must tell
you the good news," he continued,
"that Miss Trenton and I are engaged,
and 1, at least, am ready for congratu.
lations."
STATE FAIR EXCURSIONS.
All the Railroads Have Granted a Re
duced Round Trip Fare.
Every railroad in Michigan has
granted a reduced round trip rato to
the Michigan state fair and will fup
ply extra train service. Local ticket
agents will supply information regard
ing train schedules and fares.
A man is never old enough to know
enough not to marry a girl who is
young enough to bo hla granddaughter.
The
National Grange
Conducted by Charlvs M. Gardner, Kdltor
of the National Granye, Wcstflcld, Mass.
SUCCESS OF THE GRANGE
Past Year Has Been Marked by Ex
ceptional Advancement and
Extension of the Order. '
Everybody Is interested in some
thing that succeeds, and so is the
present remarkable Grange popularity
all over the county in part explained.
The past year in the history of the
Grange has been marked by excep
tional advancement and by a degreo
of extension of boundaries never be
fore equaled in the Grange movement
In this country. The last issue of
the National Grange Monthly sum
maries this extension work most con
cisely and thero is much information
contained in the following statement
from that paper:
One of the tests of the vitality of
an organization is found in its capac
ity for growth, as witnessed by the
accession of new members and the
establishment of more branches.
When such evidences appear, it is
reasonably safe to believe the or
ganization prosperous and its outlook
good.
Thus measured, tho National
Grange may well be congratulated on
what the nino months of its present
year have wrought in the extension
of its boundaries. During the months
of the present summer quarter tho
hot weather and tho busy activities
of the farm are likely to preclude
much extension work; so that the
nine months from October 1 to July
1 practically cover the organization
season of the year.
For the quarter ending January 1,
90 new Granges were organized and
10 were reorganized; for the quarter
ending April 1, 1SG new Granges
were organized and 20 were reorgan
ized; for the quarter ending July 1,
118 new Granges were organized and
13 were reorganized; making a nine
months total of 403 new Granges or
ganized and 49 Granges reorganized.
A more ' substantial evidence of the
strength of the order could hardly
bo asked than In its capacity thus
clearly shown, to build up itself in
new fields and to attract to its mem
bership the thousands of people which
the charter rolls of these new Granges
represent.
It is further significant to note that
these new Granges represent exten
sions of the order in all the Grange
states. In the first quarter's organiza
tion, 23 states shared; in the second
quarter, 25 states; in the third quar
ter, 22 states. For first place in or
ganization records, there appears to
be pretty stiff rivalry, and enough de
sirable competition to make the con
test lively. So far Ohio heads the
list, with 4G new Granges during the
nine months; Oregon is a close sec
ond, with 45 ner Granges; Michigan
organized 41; Washington, 40; New
York, 38; Pennsylvania, 27. Here in
these six leaders is vividly seen
Grange interest in the far east, In
the middle west and on the Pacific
slope. Similarly widespread interest
and growth are evidenced in the
states of fewer organizations, while
every listed Grange state in the coun
try has shared in the institution of
new Granges or the reviving of old
ones.
These are some facts about the
Grange which patrons who desire to
bo thoroughly informed on the order
will do well to keep in mind. They
will prove a good answer to people
who are continually seeking to dis
credit the Grange and to belittle its
influence and popularity, and may well
be stored up in memory for use on
needed occasions. Grange growth is
steady, substantial and nation wide.
REST ROOMS FOR THE WOMEN
Grange Committee in Michigan Is Es
tablishing Them in the County
Court Houses.
An interesting phase of Grange
work is brought to light in Michigan,
through a plan to establish "rest
rooms" in the county hourt houses.
This is a plan taken up by the wom
an's work committee of the Michigan
State Grange and Is already well un
der way. In Antrim, Oakland and sev
eral other counties, such rooms are
set aside in the court houses, which
are free for the use of any woman
who wishes to rest during shopping,
or desiring to use the toilet or lava
tory, rearrange her hair, cat a box
lunch or have a cup of tea; also to
pass the otherwise weary time while
waiting for trains or as an appoint
ment place for meeting friends. Tho
women of the counties nlready pro
vided find these "rest rooms" a God
send indeed and there is a call for
their extension into other counties as
rapidly as possible.
It is the present plan of the worn
an's work committee, when it shall be
proved that theso "rest rooms" meet
a genuine need among the women of
the state, to extend the idea by hav
ing the rooms fitted up very attract
ively, supplying them with numerous
conveniences not yet attempted nnt
having competent attendants it
charge. That such rooms shall nlso
be used as conference centers and as
meetings places for various projects
In which the women of Michigan are
Interested, is also one of the further
objects to be striven for. There ore
more than seventy counties in Michi
gan, which affords a glimpse of the
magnitude of the present movement,
if the hopes of the promoters can,br
eveu approximately realized.
A PHYSICAL WRECK.
Given Up By Physicians Cured By
Doan's Kidney Pills.
Edward Gucker, 612 S. 14th St.,
Mattoon, 111., says: "I could scarcely
6tand tho terrible pains in my back
and I gradually ran down until I was
a physical wreck.
My kidneys were in
terrible condition
the urine passing too
freely and being a
chalky white in col
or. My appetite fail
ed, I lost flesh rapid
ly and could not
sleep. Tho doctors thought I had only
a short time to live. I was so great
ly Improved after short use of Doan's
Kidney Pills that I continued and was
completely cured. I am positive that
Doan's Kidney Pills will cure any case
of kidney trouble if taken as directed."
Remember the name Doan'3.
For sale by druggists and general
storekeepers everywhere. Price 50c.
Foster-Milburn Co., Buffalo, N. Y.
A PARADOX.
Manager Ha3 your new play plen
ty of life In it?
Playwright Sure. "Why, eight peo
ple aro killed in the last two acts.
The Brute.
"Men are such rude things," said
the supercilious girl.
"Has any of them dared to address
you without an introduction?"
"No; but in a crowd one got his
face all mixed up with my hatpin and
never even said 'excuse me'."
An Equivalent.
"The man in the office with me did
not get the advantage of me. I gave
him a Roland for his Oliver."
"But which is really the better
make?"
D You
one of
4
66,562
Acres
Excellent
Train Service
The Direct
Route
The Best of
Everything
3.000 Farms?
NW10I2
W. L. DOUGLAS
2,50,3.00,3.50&4.00 SHOES
WOMEN wear W.LDougla stylish, perfect
fitting, easy walking boot, because they give
long wear, same as W.L.Douglas Men's shoes.
THE STANDARD OF QUALITY ffl
FOR OVER 30 YEARS
The workmanship which has made
Douglas shoes famous the world
maintained in every pair.
If I could take you into my large I
at Brockton, Mass., and show you
carefully W.L.Douglas shoes are made,
would then understand why they are war
ranted to hold their shape, fit better and
wear Ion ger than any other make for the price
PflllTlfW T1 Cr,"ln have W. I Pongls
UHu I lUil name nnd price stamped on bottom !
If yon cannot obtain W. L. Douglas Mines la
our town, writs for catnloe. Shoos sent
from factory to wearer, all bar pen prepaid.
DOUGLAS, 145 Spark St., Urockton,
XT'
Cement Talk No. 3
Concrete is the
hardened rock-like
product made by usinff
some brand of Portland
cement with sand, gravel
or broken stone and
water. The cement is the ma
terial which hinds the sand,
gravel or hroken stone to
gether; this binding action is
produced by water. The terrm
"Cemejit" and "Concrete"
thus have different meanings,
although they arc frequently used
interchangeably. While cement is
only one of the materials in concrete,
it is perhaps the most important. To
insure the best results in concrete work,
the highest grade of Portland cement
should be used. The concrete worker
may rest assured that he lias the best
cement if he will make certain that the word
UNIVERSAL is printed on each sack of
cement that he buys. Representative deal
ers everywhere handle UNIVERSAL.
UNIVERSAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO.
CHICAGO-PITTSBUKG
ANNUAL OUTPUT 10,000.000 BARRELS
DON'T CUT OUT A VARICOSE VEIN
ABSORBIBEJRSSIff
A mild, mil'B, antiseptic, d I sen
tient, resolvent liniment, undk
lroven rpmoUy forthisand slra
ilurtroubloH. Mr. It. O. Kelloi-f,
JJrcket, Mass., lie fore usin( Uu
renuMly, siifterl Intensely wlli
rnlnful and Inflamed vnlnat
hY were swollen, knotted ana
hard, lift writes: "After usmJ
one. and nne-hulf bottles ox
A HKOKIt I N i: . JR.. the Teld
wero reduced. Inflammation and pain gotie. and I
hare had no recurrence of the trouble during the
Past six years." Also removes tiolire, Painful
welll np. Wenn, Cysts. Callouses, Bruises, "lilacfc
and Blue dlscoioruUi)R, etc., In a pleasant manner
Trlcef 1.U0 and t-'.OOa hot tic at druutfislii or delivered.
Jlook 5 i f roe. Writ.. for lu
W. r. Vol NO, r. O. P., ni01nplc Hirert, flprlnrHtkl, Iiu,
GARY ACT
land and waterrlpfcts.Open
to entry on Big Wood
Klver project In Southern
Idaho. t.Su.bU an arm 1 . 12
annual Installment. Ampin water supply iruaran
Uivd. IDAHO IKUIUATION CO., Itivbield. Idaho.
W. N. U., DETROIT, NO. 35-1911.
these
i
u r
V 0 I
Want
Prices range from 25c to $6.00 per acre:
President Taft has issued a proclamation throw
ing' open to settlement the Pine Ridge and
Rosebud Reservations located in Dennett and
Mellette Counties, S. D.
The land subject to entry will approximate
466,562 acres.
Points cf registration are Grprry. Dallaa and
Rapid City, South Dakota.
Time of registration, October 2nd to 21st inclu
sive, 1911.
Drawing begins at Gregory, S. D., October
24th, 1911.
The lands to be opened to settlement are some
of the choicest in South Dakota.
For printed matter and full particulars
apply to
A. C. JOHNSON, Paenger Traffic Manager
C. A. CAIRNS, Cen'l Patt'r and Ticket Agent
Chicago and North Western Railway
226 IV. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, III,
over w mmMm&m Ls
factories M.'
how
you
direct ONK TAlItof tnr IIOTSt S3.S2.50or
TT.I S3.M SMOKH will pnaltlvely oatfr
Mass. THO fAlKS of ordinary boys' sheet

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