OCR Interpretation


The Aberdeen Democrat. (Aberdeen, South Dakota) 1???-1909, February 09, 1906, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn98069055/1906-02-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

y—NO. 1" JtrM.
A MILLION MEN
1*0 QUIT WORK
ST OF APRIL"*,
v' "vjfi
ee
of Operators and
Indianapolis
Fails to
age Scale, the Work-
on
Their Demand for
and
the Employers
in Opposition
Feb.
2.—The
joint con-
operators and miners
ntral competitive and
ids has adjourned sine
agreement on ft wftg©
journment was lmme
,j by a session of the
1 convention, at which
en regarding a demand
wages was reaffirmed,
fluence not now fore
450,000 miners will
1 in an effort to en
and for an increased
esslon of the joint con
erators and miners a
by F. L. Robbins, the
the operators, that the
cale be continued, was
ired under the rules a
to carry any of the
ositions. Operators of
nd Pennsylvania voted
Illinois operators die
The miners of Ohio,
lnois voted against the
atrick Dolan, president
vania miners, voted his
reposition, which caused
ong the miners. His
Pennsylvania
miners
uance of the present
of the fact that the
ventlon had voted for
challenged by several
ania miners, but on an
chair the vote was so
motion to adjourn sine
by F. L. Robbins imme
'ng the announcement
eitlon of the operators
his motion had been
tchell has declared that
cumstances would the
any agreement that did
it an increase in wages
s' convention has unani
the exception of three
the action of the
iumittee which refused
of the operators for
age scale to be contin-
SEPARATION
E CASTE LLANE, FOR-
ISS GOULD, BRINGsilf
FOR DIVORCE. .^JlSS
sSM
5—Countess Boni de
ru'.erly Anna Gould) en
rol- divorce during the
niatives of the countess
appeared before a judge
io the French law, en
rrunge a conciliation be
a definite suit to pr£
that the judge's efforts
e«i'ul und that the suit
1
"wing to the secrecy
weuings here it is difli-.
•'•is report.
been current for along
countess had decided
6ei'
continuation of her
husband was impos-,
'""'Oval from the Cas
to
a
hotel in the cen-
fn
to the belief
finally decided to apply
rcula.°n.Sat,0nal
r®P°rt8
tn
wlth
re'®renee
conduct and the name
ven vy,leader
of
Part8-
nigh standing, has
utthlU
Connectlon
with
tin
Uve t0
the
progress
oul TlQS a cS
°Xn^d40
b*
PRINCIPLE.
MOrOCean
3—The
Mo-*
VmT
0rni^
at
,Utin*
'ncipie to
11
of
Mop in«ease
th*
•Und °»t Sf°tha»4
t°»CW"
1
It*. CUStOHM'
JProvement of the.
ere
adopted ad
rererenaum, as some of the cleleeatf!
were not instructed. Many objections
were raised to the proposed increase
In the. customs.
BROTHER AND SISTER KILLED.
Train Hits Buggy in Which Wisconsin
Couple Are Riding.
NEWS CONDENSATIONS
Thursday, Feb. 1.
Continued heavy earthquake shocks
are causing a panic at Guayaquil,
Ecuador.
Former Senator David B. Hill has
been ordered South by his physician
for a prolonged rest.
The Clyde line steamer Cherokee,
which went aground on the Brigantine
•hoals on Jan. 12, has been floated.
An agreement providing for the es
tablishment of a parcel post at cheap
rates between Sweden and the United
States has been concluded.
The entire business portion of the
town of St. Albans, W. Va„ was de
stroyed by fire Wednesday. Loss,
$80,000, with but little insurance.
Midshipman Ned Leroy Chapin has
been dismissed ffrom the naval acad
emy for hazing. He was a member of
the first class and appointed from
California.
Friday, Feb. 2.
With 130,000,000 worth of gold bars
on hand awaiting coinage the new
Denver mint began operations Thurs
day. About 100 persons are employed.
John Lestham of Sturgeon Bay,
Wis., -senior member of the Lestham
& Sm{£h Towing and Vessel company
and well known in marine circles, is
dead at Los Angeles, Cal.
Moritz von Baumbach, for almost
half a century a banker in Milwaukee
and for many years the consular agent
in that city of the German govern
ment, is dead, aged seventy-five years.
William B. Leeds has resigned as
chairman of the board of directors of
the Rock Island company and also as a
member of the finance committee and
the executive committee of the same
company.
Secretary Bonaparte has recom
mended to the president, through the
department of justice, that Midship
man Miller of Kentucky, sentenced to
dismissal from the naval academy for
basing, be pardoned.
8aturday, Feb. 3.
Jin overcharge of powder in Bald
Knob mine, near Delorme, W. Va„
killed two men.
The president has pardoned Mid
shipman John Paul Miller of Ken
tucky, recently convicted of hazing- at
Annapolis naval academy.
Lord Masham, the patentee of many
inventions, including a compressed
airbrake for railroads and a wool
combing machine, is dead at Masham,
Eng.
Queen Alexandra and her suite left
London Friday for Copenhagen, where
her majesty will attend the funeral of
her father, the late King Christian of
Denmark.
Dispatches to Dun's Trade Review
Indicate that almost all sections of the
country have suffered from high tem
perature and absence of snow, which
restricted distribution of winter mer
chandise. Otherwise the situation is
most satisfactory.
Hfc Monday, Feb. 5.
Fire at Richmond, Ky., did damage
aggregating $75,000 to business
houses.
The Democratic senatorial caucus
has decided to vote solidly against
ratification of the Santo Domingo
treaty.
Mrs. W. E. Corey, wife of the steel
magnate, has purchased a home in
Reno, Nev. It is said she may reside
In Reno permanently.
Lady Grey, wife of Sir Edward Grey,
the British foreign secretary, who was
thrown from a trap Feb 1 while driv
ing near Ellingham, Eng., sustaining a
concussion of the brain, is dying.
A movement has been started by
national officials of the Women's
Christian Temperance union to obtain
Miss Alice Roosevelt's co-operation to
ward, barring wine from her wedding
breakfast.
Tuesday, Feb. 6.
Segregation of the sexes is to be
tried as an experiment in the Chicago
public schools.
Egbert Whittaker, the oldest mem
ber of Ulster county bar, is dead
at Baugertles, N. Y., aged ninety.
By order of King Frederick the
fhnaral of the late King Christian of
Denmark will take place Feb. 18.
Mrs. Lilbura G. McNair, prominent
la society and champion woman golf
player Of St. Louis, shot and killed
herself at her home in that city.
Charges haveToeen preferred against
W. C. Bristol, United States district
ERDEEN'
"ons aie tluit he will „ot ahl* tn~
retain the office.
atATonpLnei^en'
a
5
Wia'' Feb* 6-—Anne
and
Christ Sorenson, brother and sister
aged forty and twenty-eight years, re
spectively, were killed by a Chicago
and Northwestern passenger train at a
crossing near the village. The train
was an hour late and in turning a
•harp curve caught the buggy in which
the Sorensons were riding.
in if
I)r0!nineit
Wednesday, Feb. 7.
Marinette
I,0«
lpany ot
sui.t
the lake rUS
itSSc,re"":t
co,,rt
,?h® thirty-third annual reunion of
War v*
Associat'on
Saturday, Feb. 3.
House—Esch (Wis.) and Clayton
(Ark.) were the principal speakers on
the railroad rate legislation bill, both
speaking in favor of the measure.
Senate—Not In session.
Monday, Feb. 5.
Senate—Mr. Patterson (Dem., Colo.)
introduced a resolution declaring the
action of the Democratic senatorial
caucus instructing members how to
vote on the Dominican treaty to be
contrary to the Constitution of the
United States. Decision reached to
vote on ship subsidy bill Feb. 14.
House—Littlefiehl (Me.) and Gros
venor (O.) spoke in opposition to the
rate regulation bill, while ten mem
bers spoke in favor of the measure.
Tuesday, Feb. 6.
House—Seventeea speeches made
on the rate bill, all of them in favor of
the measure. The railways came in
for an unusual amount of criticism.
Senate—Entire day given to a re
view of the prerogatives of the senate
in the matter of framing treaties.
LOCK CANAL FAVOKEi)
ISTHMIAN COMMISSION'S RECOM­
MENDATION SUBMITTED TO
SECRETARY TAFT.
Washington, Feb. 3.—The report of
the isthmian canal commission, record
ing its decision in favor of an eighty
flve-foot level lock canal, was submit
ted to Secretary Taft during the day.
The report is accompanied by the re
port of the board of engineers, the
majority of whom declared for a sea
level canal. It will now be for Secre
tary Taft to express his own views
upon the great project in an endorse
ment when transmitting the papers to
the president.
It appears that Rear Admiral Endi
cott, the naval member of the commis
sion, was the only one who differed
with the majority and favored a sea
level canal, as recommended by the
majority of the board of consulting
engineers.
VANITY
THEIR
traced
SOOTH DAKOTA, .FRIDAY FEBRUARY 9, 1906
anU Ule
lawyer
Works Manufac-
Chicago Heights
111., has gone into the hands of a
ceiver Insufficient capital is said to
oe the cause.
.J*}6
ot the
o'ty of Cleveland to
railroads troni
was deoi/l
land on
Va ,ed at
Sited it
*15-°00.000,
agaln the City the
of Mexican
War Veterans will be held in Wash
ington Feb. 22 and 23. It will be the
first reunion held at the national cap
ital since
1883.
President Roosevelt, in a letter to
Chairmen Hale and Foss, respectively
of the senate and house naval commit
tee, urges that legislation be enacted
at the present session of congress to
regulate the punishment Uv hazing at
naval academy.
WORK OF CONGRESS,
Thursday, Feb. 1.
House—Resolution passed calling
for the estimate of cotton yet to be
ginned, which the director of the cen
sus has compiled but which he has
no authority to make public until
March. Balance of the day devoted to
debate on the rate regulation bill.
Senate—Thirty of forty miscellane
ous bills passed and several hours'
time given to the consideration of the
shipping bill.
Friday, Feb. 2.
House—Oratory on the railroad rate
bill occupied six hours of the session.
The speeches of Burton of Ohio, Mc
Call of Massachusetts and Russell of
Texas were features, while Thomas oi
North Carolina, Burke of South Da
kota and Gouldpn of New York took
op particular and specific topics.
Senate—Debate on ship subsidy bill
continued and a number of unimpor
tant measures passed.
UNDOING.
Lettish Rebel Leaders Photographed
in Uniform.
St. Petersburg, Feb. 3. Vanity
proved the undoing of scores of Let
tish revolutionary leaders desirous ot
immortalizing
their connection with
the armed insurrectionary militia. The
leaders were photographed in groups,
wearing their uniforms, and these pic
lures subsequently fell into the hands
th. authorities, who Om
the originals and tried them
by courtmartial.
ND THE
Ml
CVENTS OF A WEEK THROUGH-
|l OUT THE STATE.
Secretary of State Calls in Outstand-
ing Warrants—Great Artesian
Basin in the Vicinity of
Belle Fourche.
On the strength of an opinion by At
torney General Hall the state treas
urer on Feb. 1 transferred $50,000 of
surplus in the bond interest and sink
ing fund to the general fund and
called in outstanding warrants to that
amount. Through the use of the ac
cumulated general fund from the last
quarter's collections a call was sent
out last week for about $25,000 of gen
eral fund warrants, reducing the out
standing obligations of "the state about
$75,000 by these two calls.
Great Artesian Basin.
It has been demonstrated that all
the country about Belle Fourche, from
Minnesela several miles up Hay creek
and as far north and east as Snyder'a
ranch below Snoma, overlies a great
artesian basin filled with the purest
of water. Frank Durst has just struck
a flow of soft water with a capacity of
200-gallons a minute. The well was
driven on top of a hill and is a little
less than 700 feet deep. Because of
its location the entire farming country
can be well irrigated.
Gamble Continues the Fight.
The appointment of Peter Unrah as
postmaster at Tyndall has been held
up at the suggestion of Senator Gam
ble In order that opportunity may be
given for the presentation of charges
against Unrah, who is endorsed by
Representatives Burke and Martin.
Postmaster Stillwell, the present in
cumbent, is the father-in-law of
Jfames D. Elliott, United States dis
trict attorney, who is the manager of
Senator Gamble's campaign for re
election.
Taxes Increase Half a Million.
The. state auditor's oflice has com
pleted a compilation of,, the taxes ex
tended in all the counties of the state
for the years 1904 and 1905, showing
the total amount of taxes which will
be called for all purposes, state, coun
ty, township or municipal. The fig
ures show an increase of practically
$600,000 for 1905 over 1904. The total
amount asked for in 1904 was $5,020,
846.87 and to meet the demands of
1908 $6,519,830.88 Is called for.
Remittance Will Be Returned.
The governor's office has received a
letter from one of the New England
states in which was enclosed a $1 bill.
The only communication accompany
ing the remittance was: "Please find
enclosed $1 for the enlightenment of
your state, which bum ought to have
been mailed not later than Dec. 31,
1905." As there is no enlightenment
fund in the state treasury the remit
tance will be returned to the writer as
not available.
To Make Good Fishing.
Parties residing in Lyman county
have been officially advised that a car
of the United States fish commission
soon will visit that part of the state
for the purpose of stocking the various
dams and streams in Lyman county
with fish. Lyman county is thickly
dotted over with datns, which were
constructed by stockme:n, and these,
when stocked, will make Ideal fishing
resorts.
-Slot Machines Are Ousted.
The authorities of Willow Lakes are
the latest to put on the "lid." Acting
under instructions from the town coun
cil City Marshal Carmichael has
caused the removal of every slot ma
chine in town and all these machines
have now disappeared. The warfare
against them is due to the activity of
the members of the Willow Lakies Wo
men's Christian Temperance union.
For Attempted Murder.
Charles Alberts and Mrs. Bella Da
vis have been sentenced to prison at
Webster for the attempted murder of
Mrs. Davis' father, A. S. Bryant, who
resides in the vicinity of Andover.
Alberts will serve four years In the
penitentiary and Mrs. Davis will be
imprisoned for fifteen months. Each
has served four months while await
ing the opening of.the circuit court.
New Buijdings at Indian School.
Congress has appropriated the sum
of $25,000 for buildings at the Indian
school near Rapid City. The buildings
to be erected will be an industrial
building and barn, both of brick, a
hospital and a water powerhouse.
They must be completed by Aug. 1,
which will give the cdntractorajmly a
little inore than (lye months in which
(o do the work.,
Political Party Colors.-
The Democratic state committee, at
its late meeting, selected cream color
as the official shade for the ballots of
that party at the primaries this year.
This makes three selections so far—
white for Republicans, red for Social
ists and cream for Democrats.
Gold Production for .1905.
The annual report of Mine Inspector
Nicolas Treweek has been filed with
Governor Elrod, showing that the pro
duction of gold bullion by South Da
kota for last year was $7,191,534, of
which the Ho'mestake mine produced
$6,080,000.
Pasture for Native Buffalo.
Congressman Burke has introduced
a bill authorizing the secretarj' of the
Interior to lease 5,000 acres of the
public domain for a pasture for native
buffalo in South Dakota.
PATTERSON PROTESTS
COLORADO SENATOR REFUSES TO
BE DICTATED TO BY DEMO­
CRATIC CAUCUS.
Washington, Feb. 5.—Mr. Patterson
(Colo.) caused a sensation in the sen
ate by introducing a resolution rela
tive to the rights of senators in voting
upon treaties.
Mr. Patterson's resolution recited
that the action of the Democratic cau
cus in dictating to senators how they
should vote was a plain violation of
the spirit and intent of the Constitu
tion of the United-States that each
senator was entitled to one vote and
any attempt to coerce him was an in
vasion of the rights of a state that
any senator who permits himself to be
so coerced weakens and degrades his
state that for any senator to vote
otherwise than as his sense of duty
dictates degrades his high office and
assails the dignity and standing of the
senate.
The resolution was listened to with
great interest by the senators.
Mr. Tfllman objected to the present
consideration of the Patterson reso
lution unless it was a question of per
sonal privilege. Mr. Patterson said it
was not and gave" notice that he would
discuss the resolution later.
TERMS ARE DRASTIC
REPORT OF THE JOINT STATE IN­
SURANCE INVESTIGATION OF
THE NEW YORK LIFE.
New York, Feb. 3.—It Is said on
good authority, according to a morning
paper, that the report of the insur
ance commissioners of Tennessee, Min
nesota, Nebraska, Wisconsin and Ken
tucky on their examination into the
affairs of the New York Life Insur
ance company is most drastic and de
mands the resignation of several per
sons still connected with the com
pany.
It also, according to this authority,
threatens the New York Life with ex
pulsion from the states concerned in
the examination unless the demands
are met. The paper adds:
"It is also learned that the docu
ment which the outside commissioners
have adopted as their final report dif
fers considerably from the one which
was originally drawn.
"The first report, it is said, was re
garded by Commissioners Host of
Wisconsin and Pierce of Nebraska as
altogether too mild and they demand
ed a complete revision. -These two
commissioners, it is understood, suc
ceeded in impressing their views upon
the other three, with the result that
the report hits out without gloves at
every vulnerable officer and trustee."
FIVE FOUNd DEAD IN BED.
Mother Evidently Killed Her Children
and Herself.
Boston, Feb. 7.—A woman and four
ohildren were found dead in bed at
their home, 29 Dennis street, Roxbuvy
district, at night. An investigation by
the police indicates that the woman,
Mrs. Annie L. Dixon, had killed the
children and herself by opening three
gas jets. The children were:
Annie, aged five years George,
three and a half years Mildred, t^wo
years, and Marion, one year
iT
DOLAN ASKED TO RESIGN.
Miners of the Pittsburg District Oust
4 President.
Pittsburg. Feb. 6.—By practically
unanimous vote the resolution de
manding the resignations of President
Patrick Dolan and Vice President
Uriah Bellingham for violating their
instructions in voting to accept the
old wage scale at Indianapolis, and of
Secretary Treasurer Dodds by reason
of his election to the office of clerk
of the circuit court of Allegheny coun
ty was passed during the afternoon.
President Dolan said he would not re
sign and that the miners would have
to reolace him by a referqndpm vote.
?c
$
ONE DOLLAR A YEAR
LAWSON READY TO TURN OVER
LIFE INSURANCE PROXIE8
SECURED BY HIM.
Claims to Control the New York Life
and Mutual Life of New York and
Names the Governors of Minnesota,
Iowa and Florida, Senator La Fol-
lette and Ex-Attorney General Mon-
ett of Ohio to Vote the Proxies.
Des Moines, Feb. 7.—Thomas W.
Lawson of Boston during the day
called on Governor Albert B. Cummins
and invited him to serve with four
other well known reformers on a com
mission to which he will turn over his
New York Life and Mtftual Life of
New York proxies and which he asks
to attend the coming annual meetings
of these two companies for the pur
pose of electing good, honest, sound
business men as directors.
Governor Cummins replied that he
would consider the proposition and
after a conference with Governor
Johnson of Minnesota, one of the
other members, would make definite
answer.
Mr. Lawson told Mr. Cummins that
the other members of the commission
would be Governor Jehnson of Minne
sota, Senator La Follette of Wiscon
sin, Governor Browhard of Florida
and ex-Attorney General Monett of
Ohio.
Mr. Lawson said he had received a
large number of proxies from policy
holders in the New York Life and Mu
tual Life of New York, which, with
the others he expects to get and which
he is confident will come in after the
commission plan goes through, will
give him control of both companies.
IN FEAR OF EXPOSURE.
Rev. Dr. Simmons, Banker, Minister-'
and Politician, Ends His Life.
Peoria, 111., Feb. 7.—Rev. Dr. G. H.
Bimmons, paetor of the First Baptist
church, president of the Interstate
Savings bank and the People's Savings^
bank and recently appointed manager::,
of the Yates senatorial campaign Jn
Peoria county, was found dead in bed,
having committed suicide during the
night.
The body was found by his wife
when she called him to breakfast. A
letter found beside him showed his
death to have been premeditated.
Three physicians who were hastily
summoned gave as their opinion that
death was caused by cyanide of potas
sium. Coroner Baker took charge of
the remains.
Dr. Simmons came to the First Bap
tist church five years ago from Terre
Haute, Ind., and had been remarkably
successful. He secured national pub
licity two years agfe by advocating a
dramatization of the life of Christ. He
became local manager of the sena
torial campaign of former Governor
Yates a week ago, shortly after seri
ous stories affecting his morals were
circulated. State's Attorney Scholes
undertook an investigation and se
cured some sensational confessions
from boys of his congregation. Dr.
Simmons was forty years old and
leaves a widow. He held charges in
Texas, Jackson, Tenn., and Louisville,
Ky., before coming here.
COURT OFFICIAL ACCUSED.
Twenty-five Indictments Against Chi
cago Man.
Chicago, Feb. 3.—John A. Linn, for
eight years clerk of the superior court)
of Cook county, has been indicted by
the grand jury, which has charged?
him with larceny, embezzlement ands
forgery. Twenty-five separate indict-a
ments were returned against Linn.
One. of them charges that he entered1
into conspiracy with Frank J. Chaiser,
a clerk in his office, to defraud Cook
county out of $50,000 by false pre
tenses another that he embezzled^
money and warrants belonging to thei
county, valued at $5,000 nine fndict-»
ments allege that he committed lar
ceny against the county by taking dif
ferent sums of money, ranging from
$100 to $1,850 twelve indictments de
clare that Linn forged county warrants
for sums ranging between $12 and
$117 another indictment charged that
Lluf entered into-a conspiracy with
others to persuade Chaiser to remain
away from the grand jury and refrain
from giving .testimony and another
that he withheld the records of his
Office from his successor.
Farced to Travel by Sledge.
Vladivostok, Feb. 5.—General Mada-.
toft, provost
marshal of the Manchu-
rian army, arrived here during the day
from Harbin to investigate the recent
disorders. The general was forced to
make the trip in a sledge, as the rail-'
road men refused to forward the train
On
which he intended.to travel.
ikjt

xml | txt