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The Aberdeen Democrat. (Aberdeen, South Dakota) 1???-1909, October 05, 1906, Image 3

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn98069055/1906-10-05/ed-1/seq-3/

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Thtit on* feature en the
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CANTON
Diamond Gang Plow
That stands Head and shoulders above any other riding plow' made
anywhere, by anybody, at any price.
It is this—I t's Special Controlling Rod provides for the rigid locking
of the rear wheel when plowing, and the automatic unlocking of the same
when turning a corner. ||j|gj||g|
... A square corner can be turned without touching a single lever,
Even the deviation of the team does not affect the true, straight path
of the rear wheel and the plow.
In other words, you don't have to watch the Diamond Plow at all. ,,,
It works automatically in its changes. That saves worry. Ll£m
This is but ONE point.
There are others equally as telling.
We know of no other plow so substantially put up.
We know of no other plow that does as good work.
We know of no other plow built of such staunch materials....,
.If we did, we wouldn't handle the Canton.
Come in and let us show you the whys and wherefores of the Canton.
Maylje you'd be of the same opinion as we, then.
P. & O. CANTON PLOWS
vr And other farm implements that we are willing to be judged by/
Coleman & Co.1'
ABERDEEN, SOUTH DAKOTA
|.W. H. WILSOIST,
OPPOSITE NEWS OFFICE
'..•••
SssjS VP
Day Phone Green 161: Night Phone Blue 402 Residence with John
Breidenbach, South Washington street.
SPST
Residence For Sale I
Large, well built house good shed and large barn. Good well
bi -water aiid curi-erli Fmo liuulc toy TcLucu taiiiicr -*ThO rr'SucS-tC
keep a little stock. Corner of Main street and Twelfth avenue near
normal school.sThreelots, 7
5x 14 2 feet.
tji® Call on orwrite
HtiBSttl
Itol
SiS
J. B. MOOSE FURNITURE COMPANY
LICENSED EMBALMERS AND GRADUATE UNDERTAKERS
PHONE: Day Call—Red 154. Night Call—Green 202.
ABERDEEN
S. D.
tfj-iVa r^assft KvH&Ta£xf 4
M:
Price If Onick Sale |3,500
'41m
E.iSEi^LEvAbcrdeen,S.D,
SJAMESi KEATING*
BARBE
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sir lu
.../• ,4 ,, 5r
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IKSlPli
NOfiTBXRN CollNTIES INCREASE
SOUTHERN COUNTIES DECLINE
Southern Tiers of Counties Show
Loss in School Population of 526
—Northern Counties Show Gain
of 2,704—New Counties Across
the River Doing Well for Their
Country.
Pierre, S. D., Oct. 2.—-(Special to
the American.):—-The school census
reports for the present year have
been filed in the state land depart
ment for the purpose of apportion
ment of the school fund, and show an
increase of 2,704 in school popula
tion in the past year, with a total of
141,598 children. The reiports show
an increase in population in the
northern and western counties of the
state, and a decrease in the southern
counties. Take the group
fit
MACCABEES START THEIR WORK
Commander Waters and Deputy Aus
7 tin Begin at Bristol
Monday morning P. C. Watters,
state commander, and W. W. Austin
•ho was appointed deputy state com
mander last June at the convention
held in this city, left for Bristol to
institute a new lodge. Several of the
business men of Bristol, knowing the
adequacy of the Knights oiTthe Mac
cabees petitioned Mr. Watters to or
ganize in, their town at the earliest
possible date.
The Maccabees have a membership
of over a third of a •million, With four
hundred million dollars of insurance
in force.' Over six millions of dollars
of this amount is invested in govern
ment and municipal bonds, with
which to protect1 Its/members. They
operate in fifty-eight states and ter
ritories of the United States and Can
ada.
Mr. Watters since coming to this
state has had phenomenal success in
his work, which has .been the result
to a large extent of his knowledge of
fraternal worik, but which could not
have been accomplished did he not
have the hearty co-operation of the
members of South Dakota, who are all
boosters.
Mr. Watters handles his work on a
unique advertising 'plan of his own
which has been adopted'by several of
the state commanders of other states.
Mr. Austin, who assists in the work
this year, has had considerable ex
perience in advertising work, having
had Charge of the advertising depart
ment fthis paper at its start. Atter
finishing the work at Bristol Mr.
Austin will go to Summit to institute
anew tent and in the meantime will
spend considerable time at Webster,
W«utoay and Groton, enlarging the
membership of those tents. Wtr. Wat
ters "letuined'iaBt nlgliiJfFiilur Bristol
and reports that they had nearly se
cured a charter list there yesterday,
and that a tent would be organized
there on Saturday night in all proba
bility. .~?v
ANTI-SALOON LEAQUE
-*%8
Eiect Officers aad Prepare to- Work
Legislature
Mitchell, s. D., Sept. 29.
annual meeting of the fiouth Dakota
Anti-Saloon League resulted in the
selection of a superintendent to han
dle the session of the legislature,
where It expects to accomplish more
in the line of temperance legislatlon
work of the state, the position hav
ing been filled temporarily. Rev.
F. W. Grafton pf Dell Rapids was
chosen for the plaoe. He has been
Working in the field, for severtw
months and fills the requirements of
the work admirably. The league has
mittee was appointed
.. ..
1%
coun­
ties in the southeastern part of the
state: Yankton, Clay, Union, Lin
coln, Minnehaha' and Bon Homme
show a loss of 526 in school popula
tion, the heaviest loss being in Union
with 178 and Bon Homme next with
121, while the others range along
with smaller figures.
On the other hand the counties of
Butte, Lyman, Stanley, Gregory,
Pennington and Meade show an in
crease of 1,683, of which Lyman
and Gregory show the greatest in
crease, Lyman showing 566 and
Gregory 423 the others coming in
with good sized increases to make
up. the total showing.
Another feature which the. busi
ness of the state land department re
veals is that this year the payments
of interest and full payments for
lands are all coming in from the
northern part of the state, and the
southern part is lagging* behind.
Several years ago the opposite was
the result, but the wet seasons of the
past two years has not affected the
people in the northern and western
portions except favorably, and they
have reaped immense harvests, while
the southern part of the- state' has
been too iwet and the conditions are
discouraging to them.
ip
tot
the purjjfoie
of buying original*!! anfflce forth*
ABEBDEEN DEMOCRAT, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5,1906
for this purpose.
The following officers were elect*
ed: President, Rev. H. P. Carson of
Scotland vice president, I. V. Sea
man of Mitchell secretary, Rev. J.
E. Booth of Miller treasurer. Rev.
A. E. Carhart of Mitchell. The
headquarters committee will be com
posed of these officers and A. Loomis
of Redfield, Professor M. M. Ramer
olf Milbank, Mrs. Eva Williams of
Watertown and Mrs. F. A. Bldwell of
Mitchell.
The finances of the league are re
ported as being in excellent shape,
making a large improvement over
past year. The cash receipts amount
to about $9,000, which includes the
$2,500 in the building fund.
The league is planning on a very
active season of work from, now un
til the session of the legislature,
where it expects to accomplish more
in the line of temperance legislation.
WILL BE, SEVENTY
't ...
Milwaukee & St. Paul is Now Busy
on Evarts Extension
Evarts, S. D., Sept. 29.—Along the
731 miles of the surveyed route of
the Milwaukee road between this
city and Butte, Mont., will he scat
tered more than seventy stations, a
majority of which will be at new
locations, either where there is al
ready a town established, or where
the company expects one to spring
up with the advent of the road.
The country to be opened up by
this new road is a good one, especi
ally in Montana, probably more fer
tile than any turn which the road
will pass on its way to the coast.
The route through Montana is far
from any of the other liries of rail
road and passes through a section
which long has been famous for its
fertility and wealth of natural re
sources.
It is estimated that when the road
is built a new town will be estab
lished about every tefa miles. Some
of these doubtless will remain only
stations, but with the development
of Irrigation projects now being un
dertaken by the federal government
and by private corporations, and the
vast increase in population which is
bound to come wltih the building of
the new road, many of the towns
to be established along the Milwau
kee line will develop Into commercial
centers of Importance.
It Is understood that the road Is
making arrangements to advertise
extensively the resources *of the
Country through which, its Pacific
coast extension will pass.
PRAISE FOR THE NORMAL
Pierre Newspaper Man Writes of His
ViBit to. Institution
$00$
"A Dakotan representative enjoyed
an hour at the Northern Normal and
Industrial School this week and
noted the progress which the school
had made and the growth of its
student boiiy. The enrollment to date
for the present year is 352, seventy
five of wihom are in the model school.
The published reports relating to the
crowded condition of the institution
have not been exaggerated- Although
the assembly hall, which is' the only
study room about the school, has
been enlarged by cutting out the
partition between- it and a large
room formerly used for recitations,
it is crowded to a most uncomfortable
degree. Every form Is filled and al
ready the management is forced to
seat three students in two chairs
and there is every probability that
before the holidays even by this un
comfortable crowding the place will
not accommodate the regular normal
students. The pupils of the model
school can no longer be brought into
the chapel because of the lack of
room.
JThe necessity for a new building
to provide increased room Jor class
purposes is therefore Imperative and
it will be one of the first duties of
al tt sMa •L,nwwrl.i|A
crowded are the recitation rooms that
the president is compelled to hear
recitations in his private office w^iere
he is subject to the
ruptlOn of visitors.
It hs# seldom been tW '|rivffeise
of the Dakotan to observe a more
unitdl^apable and1enthusiastic
facultvygil gtuAont/ hodir. _The pride
in tie" Institution dlsplaVed by the
students and ,their loyilty to it is
most strikingly manifest aftd it ap
pears to a visitor that the sgnrth and
prosperity of Uie school is made the
paramount Interest of every cttlsen
of Aberdeen.—Pierre Dakotan.
4M
.... Sick Headache Cored
Sick, headache is caused ,by de
rangement of the stamatitlabd by In
digestion. Chamberlain's Stomach
and Live* Tablets correct these dis
orders and ffect a cftr&||J|y taking
these tablets as soon as iheHrst indl
tsat^on of the 'disftse aippears, the at
by
TO HAVE PAROCHIAL SCHOOL
Stem Being Taken For Erection of
Large Building
A deal is under way that means
that Aberdeen is soon to have a fine
arochlal school on the north side,
iev. F*r. N. J. Dahlmanns, pastor of
St. Mary's German Catholic church
on the. north side, Is negotiating for
the purchase of three lots Just south
of the church on north Kline street,
and it is understood that the deal is
just about closed. Before snow tails
it Is .possible that work may com
mence on the excavation of the cellar
and basement of the building*
Father Dahlmanns has been con
sidering the project of erecting a
parochial school for some time, but It
has been difficult to raise the amount
of money nece$sary. This feat has at
last been practically assured and it
is certain enough to guarantee the
purchase of the lots. It Is estimated
that $10,000 wliil be sufficient for
buying the lots and erecting the ne
cessary building:
A parochial school, if built, and
everything seems to point to its erec
tion, will be of great Importance to
the city schools. At the present time
the ward schools on the north side
are crowded to overflowing in spite
of tho fact that one of the new
portable schools was (placed there this
fall. Some weeks ago Superintendent
of Schools W. L. Cochrane made the
statement that notwithstanding the
addition of the portanbe school to the
north side that the buildings there
could not accommodate comfortably
all of the children that applied for
admission on the opening day. As
the great majority of pupils on the
north side are German Catholics the
erection of a parochial school would
ease the congestion of the city schools
to a very large decree.
WANTS ANOTHER CARRIER
Williams Thinks Aberdeen Entitled
to Another
Postmaster H. S. Williams gave
an interesting discussion yesterday
morning to a representative of the
American concerning the putting on
of a fifth carrier in this city, a mat
ter which is now being looked Into
by the postoffice Inspector of this
district He said that there were just
two ways of improving the delivery
service. One was to have the fifth
carrier put on, or in case that was
hot allowed to cut off the free de
livery to the outlying portions of the
•city. Should the latter course be
adopted the portions to suffer would
be the Wolvert'on addition, a part Of
the southern end of the city, and the
West Hill addition. If the carriers
from those portions are taken away
the residents will be compelled to get
all of their mall out of the general
delivery at the postoffice.
Mr. Williams said that he bad been
studying the figures submitted In the
last postoffice report to see what per
cent of the total receipts of the post
office department throughout the
country went toward maintaining the
free delivery system. The average
cost of the service he found to be a
trifle over 19 iper cent. The Aber
deen service at the present time,
which Includes four carriers, is but
10 per cent of the receipts of the
local office. He feels that Aberdeen
is entitled to another carrier, as the
four at the present time employed
find it impossible to cover their routes
in the eight hours in which they are
allowed to work.
GAVE BACK THE MONET
A. A. Handy, one of the earliest
settlers of this county, who has re
cently returned (from a sojourn of
twenty-one years, at New Berlin, N.
Y., had an experience with a tough
the other day which he considered
discretion the better part of valor.
He chanced to be In the rear of the
Sherman House bar room in a narrow
alley that leads out into the open
lot, when he was accosted by. a large,
burly, surly looking hobo, who asked
him for money. Mr. Handy Is getting
somewhat advanced in years and he
considered ^, possible tussel with the
stranger would not be pleasant. He
quietly asked t$e Stranger how much
he wanted and the latter replied
he thought that $2 would be about
right. (Mr. Handy forked over the
money without a word and went into
the saloon, followed by the hobo.
When both were inside Mr. Handy
demanded the return of the money,
threatening to call the police If he
did not do so. The hobo then calmly
returned the money, but forgot to
thank his benefactor for the short
loan.
Wopd has been .received In this city
of the death Sunday afternoon of
Albert 3halcraft at Walland, Wyo., of
typhoid fever. The deceasetf was un
til a few years ago a farmer of Bath
township. The remains will be sent
to 'Bath for burial. (He leaves a wife
and several broth*ro, Tom, Will and
Marx, ail of Bath and four sisters,
Mrs. Franks Park«», Mrs. William
EJvans, If w.
year)
ft
1
nr'
Wounds, Bruises and Burns
Bjrupplying •»n-«nxisepnB:TttTessnigi
to wounds, bruises, burns and like
injuries before inflammation sets in,
they may be healed with maturation
and in about one-third of the time re
quired by the old treatment. This is
the greatest disctovery and triumph of
modern surgery. Chamberlain's Pain
Balm acts on the same principle: It
uran »ulis«rpitc auu wheV'avpiiw to
such injuries, causes th£m to heal
very quickly It also allays the pain
and soreness and prevents any dan
ger of blood ipolsoning. Keep a bot
tle of Fain Balm in your home and it
will riave you" time and money, not
to mention the inconvenience and
suffering such injuries, entail. For
sale all druggists.
lJ Hyde, and an in-
-C,
^it-fenced
gmm
^W
w- wf.i
1 sixteen inoh walking plow.
1 eight foot hay rake.
1 Diio Cnltivatw.
1 Garden Cnltivator^
ISO tons good hay.
1 new 8tonghton Wagon,
1 Jackson Wagon.
1 Header and Box.
1 Hay Raek and Tracks,
1 pair Mandt Bob Bleighs.
2 baggies.
4 sets harness.
Rurm'
Tools of all kinds.
1 mare,'weight 1,200 lbs.
1 mare, weight 1,280 lbs., in foal.
1 mare, weight 1,100 lbs., in foal.
1 gelding, weight 1,200 lba.
A*.
tofoP* ^1'
Vir trt'iHff fi ifii rifiT'i
TUESDAY, .OCmSf
BEGINNING AT 10 O'CLOCK!
On the north half Section 21, Township 186,
Range 64, Oneota township, 6 miles northwest
of Westport and 8 miles southwest of Frederick
1 Deering Corn Binder (ran 1 year) 1 geldiag, ^wught 1,M0 lbfc
1 MoCormiek Orain Binder (ran 1
1 Iron Drag, 21 feet.
1 MoCormiek Xower and Winnower.
1 Acme Hay Stacker and Backer.
hernia
ter to be neglected. You may think
that you are looking titter It properly
^7$—when you get a truss,., but unless
^^that^truss is rlightly fitted the danger?1
still r6maf^:-W?Wm&%Jp
TO DO G0bD^T®8?lft«rJ
JUST BIGHT.
Years of experience in truss fitting
nables us to know ,what truss and
hat kind of a pad is needed to
P^fnroperly hold any hernia, and we also
f^pkenow just how to make a truss hold
?i|'^armly
1 gelding,weight 1,000fti.f|i
3 line draft oolts, coming 2 jim
3 fine draft oolts ooming 3
1 fine Gilping trotter,
id'
1
^'Vl meking
1 "High Lift Dutchman" (hag Bow. 1 work team/1,200 lb» eaolu
10 oolts, two y«u» old.
6 extra gop~
8 heifers Jpf^'
9 spring calves.
5 yearling calves.
1 steer, orating tiwPp'ltU.
18 Poland hog*
TERMS OF SALE—All sums under $10, cash.
Time will be given on sums of $10 and over,
till Oct 1,1007, if desired, at 8 jper cent interest
There will be plenty to eat and driqk at noon,
be real stormy the sale will be postponed three days.
Floyd B. Johnson, Janes Elliott, Aw.
HERNIA DANGEROUS
but gently, in fact—perfectly.
f,It is for your Interest, comfort and
^safety to come heris when you need a
if^russ, We charge you no foore. than
„4:Vyou will pay elsewhere for goode of
value','1#
WOODWARD 8 CO.
-Phone 1526 Red Cross Pharmacy
««5'
4{Ma^f#Hooi)
26 tuikeys.
I good Ho. 8 De land Cream Sapa*
The Standard is Never
#hen,once SNOWW HITEJIour i» oh
the banner floating in the ^bretee of
competition. The SNOW -WHITE
brand's quality Qevercom& jtown and
it's our cooBtant effort to ln^rMse it*
present high grade. "Dependable"
describes the situation exactly.
Naturally you can c^an^' on good
bread if you use 6NOW WSITEflonr.
Improved Farms For Rpt
I wot reliable teiuts fw the felkwii| farm ilildi
|^No. 1. One farm of 240 acred located 2 miles
One SO jar on the Elm
'f&ilean-to good frame granary and machine Bbeii WiWct
soU a black loam,
Rental, «S60.00 per atioum.
No. 2. Stock farm 'Contains 1240 acres, & miles nur*o-wes
mWeetport on the Sim river. About Soo acres under oitiiit
i' ff nearly all the balance of the farm is uoder tence for oufcore
'fMbay land. More ot the farm could be placed nnder cultivation
ll^deeired. Every portion of the farjubis watered either ^y th«£ Xiin S
rlver or floe springs soil a b!ack*ioem good
I farms to pay tor them 1ns)
^cern'should be able to make the price of
le led years, »i
NAKREGARG
ordinary
farm
in
five
is nf
jt
'Vii'
17 fine yellow follv blooft cats," Sue SC™**^
rat exterminators.
All kinds of household goods.
v"
Tv
k^
-J?*-*-"
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