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The Aberdeen Democrat. (Aberdeen, South Dakota) 1???-1909, April 05, 1907, Image 3

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn98069055/1907-04-05/ed-1/seq-3/

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O N E O A
On Installment, Will buy an
Edison Phonograph or
Victor Talking Machine
WE CARRY EVERY DOMESTIC EDISON RECORD IN STOCK.
RECORDITE. ONLY PREPARATION KNOWN TO MAKE DISK
RECORDS GOOD AS NEW. NEEDLES FOR DISK MACHINES 6
CENTS PER HUNDRED. ONLY EXCLUSIVE PHONOGRAPH
•PARLOR IN SOUTH DAKOTA.
A. F. CRALLE
1 1-2 Block East First National Bank, 216 2nd Ave. E.
DR. S. A. A RL I N
Dentist
Announces the removal of his office from the Voedisch Block
to the NEW FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING across
the street and half a block south of the old location.
ABERDEEN, S. D.
POTATOES
Now is the time to bring in
POTATOES
We are loading cars every
day—we will buy in any
quantity, cash or exchange.
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Kearneys-CASH
DO YOU SAVE YOUR MONEY?
ftfThe next important thing is to make it earn you more.
We claim, on account of our experience and general
knowledge of the northwest, to be able to invest it so as to
net you more profit than any other source of safe investment
open to you.
If you are interested along such lines we would like to
have you call at our office and consider some of the proposi
tions we have to offer.
You will have the benefit of our advice, and we can furn
ish you safe and conservative investments in security or real
estate that will pay you the highest possible profit consistent
,wito security of your principal.
:,r We have oeen in this line of business for twenty-three
years and believe we understand it and that we can make
you some money.
HOWARD & HEDGER
ABERDEEN, SOUTH DAKOTA
NOW OPEN F0R BUS1NESS
W. J. RETALLICK & CO'S
GROCERY STORE
Jill
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Our motto will be "always reliable" and it will be onr aim tojjfive
'pgyou the beat the market affords. Give us a trial1. Phone 1517.
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GROCERY
NorthJM
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A GIVE-AWAY
[Original.]
"Why, Bert," exclaimed Irene, "where
Ud you come from?"
"The elty, of course. That's where I
bang out"
"But you never come out to this quiet
tubnrb unless you have an object." L",,'
"Object! What object?"
Irene looked a trifle disappointed.
"Haven't you heard?" she asked.
"Heard! Heard what?"
"Oh, pshaw! I asked your object In
coming to Fern wood. You certainly
did not come to make a formal call."
"Well, then, my dear, since you will
have it so I came out to congratulate
you on your engagement to my most in
timate friend." And I gave my sister a
smack.
"Were you surprised?"
"Surprised? Of course I was sur
prised. Sandle always said he wouldn't
marry a girl with money that he
wouldn't 'play second fiddle' to any wo
man. He must be desperately in love
with you."
A happy look came into her eyes and
a warm color slowly spread Itself over
her cheeks.
"You heard it from"—
"Him. He has already asked me to
be his best man—to give him away and
all that."
"The best man doesn't give the groom
away. The groom isn't given away at
all. It's the bride."
"Well, I'm quite sure," with a mali
cious twinkle In my eye, "that Sandle
said something about giving him away.
Perhaps it was not to give him away."
"What?"
There was so sudden a transition
from pleasure to pain that I gave over
being facetious temporarily and said
seriously:
"I suppose you are quite aware that
Sandle has nothing but his profession?"
'I know that. It's fortunate I have
something. But tell me—had you any
Inkling of it?"
My trouble has always been a tend
ency to joke people. I had very much
suspected Irene's and Sandle's love af
fair, but I preferred to give her the op
posite impression. Since that time I
have learned that I never could give
people a direct answer. I must always
be misleading them. But I didn't real
ize it or the folly of It till later.
"Not the slightest suspicion," I said
in reply to ber question.
"That's -aiieer" Sb0 said thnnghtfnU
ly. "You are Sandie's most intimate
friend, and people must tell their love
to those nearest them."
Men differ about that women must
always have a confidant"
"And he never praised me to you?"
"Not that I remember. Still waters
run deep, you know."
There was a pause, during which
Irene was evidently doing a good deal
of thinking.
"When did you first suspect?" she
asked presently.
"Last fall, when I met Sandie at the
Btation on his way out here to see you.
I was going to Pinnacle. That was—
let me see—the 1st of November. I
remember the date because I had to
go to Pinnacle on that day to attend
court. Sandle when, he saw me looked
disconcerted. 'Where are you bound
for, old man?' I asked. To Fern
wocd,' he stammered, coloring. 'What
you got In your hand?* I blurted, not
thinking of the rudeness of the ques
tion. 'Flowers,' he replied. Then I
began to see that I was tramping
about in a bed W budding plants.
'Goodby!' I shouted as I dashed off to
get my train."
While I was giving this little episode^
to which Irene listened breathlessly, a
marked change came over her features.
There was a "growing' expression of
pain, which settled down, after I had
finished, to a hard, cold, rigid look.
"If Sandle asked you to give Mm
away," she said* "you have certainly
accommodated him in the most friend
ly manner. I was at home on the 1st
of November. No Sandle appeared.
Lou Westcott doubtjess received the
call and the flowers. What I suspected
is now confirmed. Sandle wished to
marry Lou, but she Is poor, and he
gave her up for me."
She stalked out of the room, turning
only to say:
There was no use finishing, for I
heard a door bang upstairs.
"Well, I'll come out all right" I said
to myself. There'll be a tiff, Sandie
arriving I went straight to Sandie's
rooms—for I felt anxious—but didn't
find him. The next day I went to his
office, butfthe. was not there.1 didn't
•ee^ him" till another morning,'when I
liet him cm the street
:7
****.-*&?1+
ABERDEEN DEMOCRAT FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1907
THE STRANGLING FIG.
ill
UTCI
Carious Tropical Tree That
Upon Other Trees.
Visitors to Mexico and other tropical
countries often have their attention
called to "the strangling fig"—a tree
that commences its growth as an epi
phyte—that Is, one form of plant life
that grows perched on another—far up
on the trunk or among the branches of
another tree, usually on a palmetto or
Bome of the kinds of palms. The roots
of the strangling tree extend down
ward around the host tree to the
ground, gradually joining together,
making a tubelike mass of roots some
times as much as six feet or more In
diameter.
When the attacked tree Is a palm
death to it is caused not so much by the
binding around the trunk as by shad
ing out its branches by the attacking
tree.
When the attacked tree is an exogen
—that is, one with wood and bark—the
attacking roots bind so tightly as to
cause a stoppage of the flow of the sap.
As the sap of a tree is really Its food
(changed by the leaves so that It can
be used) and the flow of the food is
thus stopped, the attacked tree is real
ly "starved" to death. So death to the
attacked tree is caused either by
smothering or by starvation or by both.
The peculiar manner in which the
flattened roots extend down and around
the tree give them the appearance of
some thick, slow flowing material run
ning down the tree—St. Nicholas.
GRIM OLD CROMWELL,
The Protector Made Chriatmaa
Gloomy and Seriona Day.
"Christmas was Illegal in Cromwell's
time," said au antiquary. "Those grim
old Purituus were so gloomy that they
would not have any gayety even on
Christmas day.
"Cromwell said that holly and mistle
toe were heathenish things. He said
that'they had no real Christian signifi
cance they were a part of some pagan
festival of the Druids. Accordingly he
made a law that if you decorated your
house with mistletoe at Christmas you
got thirty days In jail.
"The terrible old fellow forbade
Christmas celebrations—no dancing, no
singing, no playgoing, no feasting on
Christmas day penalty, thirty days.
"You see, it was his idea that Christ
mas was a religious, a serious time, a
time for churchgoing and prayer and
reverence and for.nothing else. The
innocent family that in Cromwell's day
sat down to turkey and plum pudding
and wound up with Christmas games
got a month all round.
VOnly for a time, though. The people
rebelled. Willing as the people had
been to put on the gloom of those
dreadful old Puritans, they insisted on
having a little joy on Christmas day,
and Cromwell after a year or two had
to give in to them."—New Orleans
Times-Democrat. :-y'
"The Woman In White."
In a letter to Charles Dickens, Wilkie
Collins Intimated the fact that the
great work upon which he bad devoted
so much time was finished, but that
the finding of a suitable title had occa
sioned him much trouble. Eventually,
feeling somewhat run down in health,
he left London for Broadstalrs, a re
sort which was a favorite with both
Dickens and Collins. While lying on
the cliff in a meditative mood one
bright morning his eyes suddenly riv
eted themselves on the white light
house which stood boldly out in the
foreground under the dazzling rays of
the midday sun. As he gazed Collins
In a semiconscious manner addressed
himself In a whisper to the light
house. "You are as stiff and as state
ly as my white woman," said be.
"White woman! White wo—the wom
an in white. Eureka! I have got It!"
And so the book was given this curi
ously inspired title.
PIS ISIS
will explain, and they'll kiss and the aborigines shoot fish with the bow
up." Thus comforting myself, I left' and arrow. The art Is extremely dlffl
the house and returned to the city. On!
He gave me a dead cut I joined him
to have It out.
"What's the matter, Sandler
"What did you give me away fpr? I
thought all men stood by all mea, i^ea
If the womaq was a sister."
"Give you away? HowT*
"Ton told Irene that I west to Fen*'
Wood on Nov. 1 «rtth some flowers for'
Loo Westcott"
^Ne, I d|dn't I told her yoo took flit
flowen to her."
"Well, I didn't I took them to Lou,
who has been an old flame at mlnK I
went to announce my-engagement with
a peace offering."
•thipder'r'.
,:i^
ft was two yean before I gave Ban
dle away again, bat the second tlmf It
alter.
The French Idea.
The Frenchman of the middle class
sacrifices everything in order to obtain
for his children some official position
or other, a mean one, perhaps, but a
sure one, leading after thirty years of
penury to a pension verging on desti
tution. This is one aspect of the decay
at the French race. It is easy to nn
derstand that two races are not evenly
"I'm awfully obliged, armed for the struggle for life if one
Bert, for giving Sandle away. You're. be made up of aspirants to official po
done me the greatest favor of my life." sition and the other of Individuals pos
"Hold on, Irene! I made up most of sesslng Initiative, daring and energy,
that story. It's true I met Sandle at, For this reason do Latin raceB decline,
the station, but never asked him a
word"—
while Anglo-Saxon races grow anf
multiply.—Paris Siecle.
Bow and Arrow Fttklaf.
In the south*seas and In various
groups of islands in the Indian ocean
88 ln
taking aim at an object un
der water the archer has to allow for
retraction. If he were to aim directly
at the fish as he sees it he would, of
course, miss. Long practice has, how
ever, made'the natives expert, to a
wonderful degree ln this, sport,—Lon
don Saturday Review.|®
a It ,Wu Tom*h.
The waiter girl' knew a thing or two
about table etiquette, so die sniffed
scornfully as she said, "it's not our
custom to serve a knife with pie."
o?" remarked the patron in surprise,
bring "me, an ax."—Christian
er. •,:-H
He Writes For Vomer.
Lady Gnshlngton—So your son Is a
real ,author! How distract!ngly inter
esting! And does he write: for money
Practical Dad—Yes I get his applica
tions about once a week.
Her'Perch.
|DJd,J* propose to her on his Jkneisr
"No, bvt sbe accepted'fclm oa them."
sMim
ABERDEEN
(•.j., Ah-"! i»
4
"Yankton" is specially good
for paving and similar purposes
because
being all cement
it will never
disintegrate nor crumble, but
always remain as hard and solid
as granite.
FOR SALE BY
mr
1
H. C. BeihTens
Hawkeye Elevator Co. t'"
Central Elevator Co. -'SS&
McCaui-Webster Elevator Co.
Holllngsworth-SHart Iyumber Co
Figure With
wMM
I. H. Herrett
lis.
The Latest and most convenient way to handle Feed and Manure in and out. of your
Barn. Cab be installed in any barn. Is operated and handled on ordinary Hay carrier
track. Is self-dumping and so easy to handle that the smallest boy can handle it. Call
and see one at the
1H
What Aberdeen thinks about
"Yankton Portland Gement
Is conclusively demonstrated in the fact that 5,000 barrels of
"Yankton'* are to be used this season in paving the streets of
that enterprising town. Aberdeen is a gO-Sheud town and wants
the best of everything, and that's why they choose "Yankton"
cement in preference to other makes.
rpxjt? rrxj A T
xiAu viaiTiuiii Aimx
IS ALL CEMENT
W
Western Portland Cement Co.
Yankton, S.' D.
Perhaps you will need a NEW BED. Don forget the ones
with the MALLEABLE IRON RAIL-they stand straight
and don't break.'
The Aberdeen furniture and Casket Co.
DAYTON
Qt
*lh
fo
U'-'A
1ESEI
CO.
"Sim®
Wherever Portland Cement
can be useji to advantage,
"Yankton" will prove of the
highest efficiency. Will
you put it to the test
f\Y
w.
We also have the belt: line of Exten
sion Tables in the city. iBQ^^ifferent
styles. See how the Leaves work or
ask our customers how they like them.
Before Buying
MMMI
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