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The Aberdeen Democrat. (Aberdeen, South Dakota) 1???-1909, October 18, 1907, Image 1

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VOLUME 6—NUMBER 1
SECOND INTERNATIONAL
CONFERENCE WILL HOI
K-
A
LAST SESSION TODAY.
Thirteen Acts Were Agreed Upon By
the Representatives of the Various
Countries, and Are Ready for Their
Signatures Must Be Signed By
June 30, 1908.
The Hague, Oct. 18.—At the tenth
plenary sitting of the peace confer
ence yesterday, M. Nelidoff presiding,
the final act of the conference was
adopted and was recorded as follows
in the minutes:
"The second international peace
conference, first proposed by the
president of the United States, hav-l
ing been, through the invitation of
his majesty the emperor of all Rus-1
sias, convoked by her majesty the
queen of the Netherlands, met June
15, 1907, at The Hague, in the Hall
of Knights, with the mission to fur
ther develop the humanitarian prin
ciples which were the basis of the
iWork of the first conference."
After giving a list of the powers
participating in the conference and
the names'of the delegates, the act
^continues:
"In a series of sittings from June
lo to October 18, in which the dele
gates were constantly animated by a
desire to meet the intentions of the
Initiator of the conference, as well as
those of the governments participat
t./.ing, the following conventions were
agreed upon, for the signature of the
,plenipotentiaries:
"1—Peaceful regulation of inter
national conflicts.
"2—Providing for an internation
al prize court.
"3-—Regulating the rights and du
^'t|es of neutrals on land.
"4—-Regulating the rights and du
ties of neutrals at sea.
"5—Coverling the laying of sub
v_ marine mines.
*. "g—-Bombardment of towns from
the sea.
"7—Matter of collection of con
'tractual debts.
"8—Transformation of merchant
men into warships.
"9—Treatment of captured crews,
"10—Inviolability of fishing boats.
"11—Inviolability of the postal
^service.
"12—Application of the Geneva
convention and the Red Cross to sea
warfare.
"13—Laws and customs regulating
land warfare.
"The right to sign these conven
tions will be open until June 30,
yp 1908."
a The closing session, of the confer
ence will be held this afternoon.
$10,000 PLEDGED
FOR M. E. SCHOOL
Vermillion, S. D„ Oct. 18.—At the
•v Methodist conference in session yes
terday, $10,000 was pledged for the
Dakota Wesleyan university at
Mitchell. The laymen will be asked
for $10,000 more, and then the uni
versity will be in a position to claim
the proffered gift of $2^,000 from
Andrew Carnegie. 'The university
will then ha*e, an endowment, of
TROOPS CHASE BOXERS
Pekln, Oct. 17.—Imperial Chinese
troops detached from the Yanktse
Kiang Valley cantonments since the
anti-missionary outbreaks at Nan
Kaag Sien, have driven the so-called
Boxers into the mountains on the
borders, of Kwang-Tung In an en
gagemeat at Chung 71 the troops
killed seventy Insurgent?
v&tfc
HAGUE CONFERENCE
TO CLOSE LABORS
He Said On Night His Wife Died She
Had Their Daughter Phone Faye
tms
«^rA
fef
i,
•A\
5 *f
fe
MAN ACCUSED OF MURDERING
WIFE TELLS OF FINDING
HER DEAD BODY,
N
Graham to Keep Her Promise.
What That Promise Was He Did
Not Know Found Wife Dead
With Chloroform Soaked Blanket
Over Her.
Decatur, 111., Oct. 18.—The early%
part of yesterday's session of the
trial of Fred and Paye Graham Ma
glll, charged with having caused the
death of Magill's first wife, Mrs. Pet
Magi 11, was occupied with the read
ing of several letters identified bf
Magill's daughter Marguerite, when
she was on the stand Wednesday, as
having been written by her deceased
mother while the latter was propped
up in bed, previous to her death.. /'-.
After the reading of the letter^,
Magill himself was placed on the
stand as the first witness of the day.
Magill told of his first wife's de
spondency, and said he saw her propr
ia u&Jn bed with pUlqws writing
letters. He told of the Incident tes
tified to Wednesday by Margnerite,
when the veterinarian was called to
chloroform a horse, and said that
Mrs. Pet Magill stated dpon the oc
casion that she wished the chloro
form was intended for her instead of
the horse. He said Postmaster Da
vidson of Clinton had told him that
Mrs. Magill had told the postmaster
that she was taking chloroform and
that Davidson had told the witness
that he said to her:
"Yoh had better get a gun and
kill yourself instead of taking chlo
roform."
f" 1
Finds Wife Dead.
He said that on the night Mrs.
Mafill died she had requested Mar
guerite to telephone to Faye Graham
not to forget her promise, whatever
it was, that Faye had made to Mrs.
Magill. Just before he retired that
night the witness said' his wife re
quested him to. get her a bqttle of
beer. He gave her a bottle from the
ice chest and then retired. In the
morning when he awoke,' he saw that
his wife was not In. the room. He
made a search of the house and found
her in the spare room, lying down,
with a blanket wrapped tightly
around her head, He spoke to her,
but got no reply, and upon examina
tion he found she was dead. The
witness said he detected the odor of
chloroform.
Denied He Loved Faye.
Asked what, in his opinion, caused
his wife's despondency, he replied:
"Her headaches and the nagging
of my mother and sister."'
"You never heard her mention any
other troubles?"^: vv
"I never did."
"Didn't, you know people were
talking about you running after Faye
and Faye running after you, and
wasn't your wife worried about
that?" ,.
"She knew people were gossiping
about Faye, and she was mad about
that."
"Were you infatuated with Faye
Graham before your wife died
"I was not"
"Were you in love with her?"
"I was not," replied the witness.
STOLEN STATUE FOUND
Clarmont Ferrand, France, Oct. 18.
—The Bt2tue~dl St. Baudlne, which
was discovered Tuesday night by the
police in a cellar leased by Antoine
Thomas, chief operative in the re
cent robberies, was about to be shlp
to^Rib Janiero for the account of a
Parisian antiquary, who sold it for
mrioo.
jsw
Ht-
«s^ 5|
*i
AMERICAN-ASIATIC ASSOCIATION
HOLDS ANNUAL MEETING
IN NEW YORK/
Instead of Japanese-American Trade
Conditions Showing a Lessening
Since the Russian War, It Has
Resumed Its Former Stand—East
ern Questions Discussed.
New York, Oct. 18.—There ihas
not been a falling off of trade with
Japan following the Japanese-Rus
slan war, but on. the contrary a
healthful resumption of normal con
ditions, was the statement of James
R. Morse, president of the American
Asiatic association, at the annual
meeting of that organization yester
day. Conditions In China, however,
have not been so good, but there are
prospects of recovery from the de
pressed conditions.
"I am sure you will join with
me," he said, "in Condemning in. un
mitigated terms the reckless and
wloked attempts that have been made
to disturb the relations of cordial
friendship existing between the peo
ple of the two countries. It is a
matter of satisfaction to all of us to
know that these have in now way
affected the perfect accord existing
between the governments at Toklo
and Washington."
The matter of Chinese exclusion,
the Japanese-American school ques
tion on. the Pacific coast, the Chinese
famine, the Japanese trade-mark sys
tem- and a "general review of the
year's work .were incorporated, in a
lengthy report by Secretary' John
Foord.
The association, he said, had not
deemed it expedient to resume its
effort to secure a more liberal Chi
nese exclusion bill.
*i iSf*
MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL CLARK-
SON, WHO DISAPPEARED,
TRACED TO ENGLAND.
It Is Asserted They Called On the
Noted Father Bernard Vaughan
for Advice—He Was Not at Home,
and They Wrote Him to Legalize
Their Marriage—Girl's Father to
Go to Rome v-*
London, Oct. 18.—Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Clarkson were in London on
Monday, October 14, and called dur
ing the day at the residence of the
famous Father Bernard Vaughan,
seeking his advice oh their marriage,
but, on being informed that he was
in the country, Ahey wrote to him,
relating the circumstances under
which they eloped, and requested the
priest to legalize their marriage in
the eyes of the, church. Thp result
is not known.,*,
Martin Maloney, the Philadelphia
multimillionaire and father of Mrs.
Clarkson, was reported under date of
October 15 to te in London and
about to go to Rome, with the object
of consulting the Vatican authorities
regarding the trouble resulting from
his daughter's elopement.
CRASH ON SOUTHERN RAILWAY
Greensboro, N.C. Oct. 18—At 10:20
last night the northbound passenger
train," Noj^gM, on the Southern rail
way, crashed into a freight train at
Rudd, el&t miles from Greensboro.
Six persoife are reported killed 'and
sixteen injured.
ABERDEEN, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1907.
ELECTION OF DIRECTORS OF IL
,:-LIN0IS CENTRAL POST
PONED AGAIN
The Comittee of Three Appointed to
Count the Proxies Still at Work
and no Election Can be Held Till
•4
They Fmish Harriman Makes
Appeal to Press.
Chicago, 111., Oct. Until the
three men, who are locked in a room
assiduously counting proxies, are
able to'report to the stockholders of
the Illinois Central Railroad, there
will be no election of directors. Twice
yesterday the stockholders assembled
only to be told that the inspectors
were not prepared to report. A final
adjournment was taken' shortly after
3 o'clock In the afternoon and carried
the meeting over until-''2^o'clock this
afternoon.
The attorneys for Mr. Harriman,
who have all along been anxious to
push matters to a speedy conclusion,
chafed sorely under tie delays Im
posed by the proxy inspectors. When
it was evident at the morning meet
ing that the committee would not be
able to report Mr, Cromwell went to
Judge Edgar Farrar, who represents
M. Fish, with a proposition that all
the proxies should b.e thrown upon
a table in the general meeting and
that the conflicting proiies should
be thrown out. This1 Would have
killed all revocations that have been
made, and the proposition was
promptly declined byvjSsii®0B? Farrar.
Jlr. Cromwell expressed himself as
anxious for a "show down." The
Fish faction, however, declined to
consider the plan for a moment, and
Mr. Cromwell was forced to acquiese
In the delay. SSH
Harriman Talks to Press
While the meeting was waiting for
some further word from the commit
tee, in order to determine' the time
to which adjournment should be tak
en, Mr. Harriman picked up his chair
and, carrying it to the end of the
press table, sat down with the re
mark:
"I think you gentlemen can do more
to settle this railroad situation than
anybody else."
When asked for an. explanation he
said:
"You can do It by refusing to
print one side of the proposition until
you have seen the man on the other
side, and let him have his say at the
same time. I am sick and most other
men are sick also, of the continued
attacks made on the railroads. When
charges are made against a railroad
the proper thing to 3o is to refrain
from publishing them until the party
bringing the charge and the repres
entatives of the railroad have had a
conference with- the representatives
of the press present. As such things
are now run. charges are printed in
the papers and the public •!receives
a wrong impression, because the rail
road side of.the question is not given
at the same time. It is the -first Im
pression that counts. Very often the
railroad is not able to make a reply
for several weeks after the charge
has been brought and the denial is
not then noticed because the matter
is no longer fresh news. The way
to settle such things is to get to
gether at- the outset and let the
charge and the denial go before the
public at the same time. This would
do away with much of the ill-feeling
that is ilow created against the rail
roads.
Cites an Instance
m,
j?|An
instanbe of where the South­
ern-Pacific was guilty in a technical
sense of a violation of the law, and
was in fact entirely guiltless, Is
found in the trouble we had when
the Colorado river broke over Its
banks. We spent millions of dollars
in forcing the river back into its
channel. It was too big a job for
the government to tackle add we had
to do it ourselves. The Colorado De
velopment company, which did the
work, also to whom we paid the bill,
asked for a rate on material which
was to be used in damming Up the
river. The Southern-Pacific quoted
(Continued on Page'- 4)
1
NO. 1 TIMOTHY SOLD FOR $21 PER
TON, ESTABLISHING NEW
RECORD.
Choice Timothy Quoted at $2 More,
With Not a Spear to Be Had.
Dealers Charge Roads With Hold?
ing Back Hay in Favor of More
Profitable Stuj{.
Chicago, Oct. 18.—No. 1 timothy
hay sold here yesterday at $21, per
ton, which is the highest price ever
paid for that commodity in this city
at this season of the year. Choice
timothy is quoted at about $2 per
ton higher than No. 1, but there is
none of this grade on the market.
Local dealers ascribe as the cause of
the scarcity an alleged embargo
which they claim has been placed on
hay by certain railroads because of
the poor financial returns derived
from handling It. -tif
The railroads, on the other hand,
maintain that they are unable to
furnish cars for the transportation
of hay. The greater part of the hay
handled In Chicago comes from the
states of Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa,
Minnesota, Nebraska and Kansas.
GOVERNMENT SUIT AGAINST OIL
TRUST WILL ADJOURN FOR
FOUR WEEKS.
Kellogg Will Interrogate Him Con'
cerning the $32,000,000 Loans
Made By Standard in 1806—Rock
efeller Telegraphs He Will Be
Present Today.
New York, Oct. 18.—William G.
Rockefeller, assistant treasurer of the
Standard Oil company of New Jersey,
Will
be-the last witness called in the
hearing of the federal suit against
the oil combine, whose session will
be adjourned this afternoon for a pe
riod of four weeks. Mr. Rockefeller
yesterday telegraphed Moritz Rosen
thal, one of the counsel for the de'
fendant, that he would be In the city
today and would be prepared to take
the witness stand. Mr. Kellogg, the
government's attorney, is particular
ly anxious to know about the $32,
060,000 loans made by the Standard
Oil company of New York to "inter
ests other than/the Standard" during
1906. Mr. Rockefeller is treasurer of
the New York company, and Mr. Kel
logg said, after hearing yesterday
that he would inquire as to whom the
loans were made and what collateral
was accepted, e* ['vi*
The government's lawyers hbpe
that Mr. Rockefeller will he able to
make clear th« nature of the large
loans made to P. ,S. Tralnor of the
Southern Pipe Line company and'to
James McDonald by the Anglo-Amer
ican Oil company.
Mr. Kellogg spent most of yester
day's session in endeavoring to
learn the identity of the the pur
chasers of the Manhattan Oil com
pany of Ohio,whose plant yfas bought
and then dismantled by the Standard.
Individual witnesses were called dur
ing the day and statements giving
the coBts and freight rates for oil for,
domestic and foreign shipments were
placed in evidence.
A O N I O N
Cleveland, O., Oct. 17.—The trien
nial council of the Congregational
church last night by unanimous vote
adopted the report of the committee
on tri-church union.
BUSINESS DISTRICT- HIT SEVERE
BLOW, AND LOSS WILL BE
^|0VER |100,000.
A. G. Ramharter, Tjufldl ng1'$1,000,
insurance $1,500 J. H. Jesson, gen
eral merchandise, $6,000, insurance
$3,500 Jesson occupied the Ramhar
ter building J. W. Brush, hardware,
John Kennedy, barber shop, building
$8,000, insurance $1,500, fixtures
$2000, no insurance Wm. Lockle,
building $2,000, insurance un-
known H. J. Johnson, office and fix-
tures J2.000. A
tures $2,000, no insurance H. A.
Young, druggist, building $2,000, in
surance $1,500, stock $7,500, Insur
ance $2,500 W. D. Huffman, proprie
tor of Argyle hotel, $12,000, insur
ance $3,500 W. R. Bishop, butcher,
building $3,500, Insurance $1,500
Fred Cought, tailor, building $500,
no insurance Senton •& Brown,
hardware, building $3,000, insurance
$1,700, stock $6,000, insurance $2,
700. Wlckersham & Graham, law
yers, saved their valuable law library
which was in the path of the fire.
The local telephone system was put
out of commission, the poles and
wires being btirned on Main street In
the burned district. The toll line
only is in operation.
As Will be seen the Insurance cov
ers but a small part of the loss, prob
ably about one-third. Nearly all of
the stores had big stocks and not
enough insurance to speak of
them. ... ...
9
tiV'fti-'T
WALL STREET^
BUMP-THE-BUNIPS
Y"_i
it*111
Only By Strenuous Fighting By Citi­
zens Was the Progress of Flames
Arretted List of Losers and
Their Losses.
Oakes, N. ti, Oct. 18.—(Special to
the American.)—As a result of the
fire at this town early yesterday
morning several of the finest business
blocks of the city are in ruins, and
the business district received the
closest call it has ever, had to total
destruction.
It is due entirely to the superhu-
man efforts of the citizens in fighting
the fir* fiend, fanned by a fierce
Wind, that the flames were brought
under control when they were.
There were quaking hearts, at sev
eral times when it seemed that noth
ing could stop the onward rush of
the roaring flames until their fury
had been appeased. Today there are
many thankful hearts that Oakes Is
still on the map.
The total loss is thought to be in
the neifhboHiood. of $110,000 to
are
the'heaviest losses:
•12.
store, $8,000, insurance $3,800 W. Mont., of which the Heinies.fir'e
fl nnmn nn A AAA 1 ... ntifnrttnol al-Afi1rhAl/)ai*B an d«\ah rln/l
G. Brown, cafe, $4,000, insurance
$1,500 E. A. Moe, jewelry, $6,000,
Insurance $2,500 E. J. Walton,
building, $6,000, insurance $2,600
Gus Struts, building $3,500, no in
surance C, L. Marshall, pool room
and cigar store, $3,800-, insurance
$2,400 W. H. Brush, postoflice, $1,- atmosphere somewhat, and the mar
000, insurance $200 Palace Cloth- ket rallied before the close^^i
Ing Co., $20,000, Insurance $5,500
on
TEMPUS FUGIT LOSES
BOOKIES HARD HIT
Lexington, Ky., Oct 18.—Through
the defeat of Tempus Fuglt in the
first rice here yesterday, the talent
was given the hardest blow of the
meeting. After scoring several times
for the first heat, the starter let the
field go with Tempun Fuglt In the
rear and in a break as he passed un
der the wire. Before' Geers could get
him on his feet: the other horses
weer a quarter of a mile in the lead
a.nd he was hopelessly shut out.
1. podoro, getting a flying start,' trot
ted away from the field as if he was
much the best, and won easily. Mar
garet O took the ne^ct three heats.
M...
#i*t
ONE DOLLAR PER Y*A»:
COPPER FIRM SUSPENDS, BANKS*
FAIL AND DIVIDENDS CUT
IN TWO CASES.
Finn of Otto Heinze & Co. I
From the Stock Exohange On Com
plaint of Firm Which Failed Ori^y
Wednesday—Amalgamated and B»^'
& M. Cut Quarterly Dividend.
I
New York, Oct. 18 rr-Sensations
followed each other in. rapid succes
sion in the financial district yester
day, as the result of the collapse of
the projected corner in United Co{
per and the suspension of a promi-
nent broke
rage firm Wednesday.
The firm of Otto H^lnze & Co,
suspended on the stock exchange.^
Dividends Are Cut,
F. Augustus Heinze, the Butte cop-„v
per magnate, resigned the presiden-ij|f
cy of the Mercantile National hank of
New York. The Amalgamated Cop-,
per company, at its directors' meet-i|fj
ing, cut its quarterly dividend froma
2 to 1 per cent. The directors of the£
Boston and Montana Copper company
The failure of 'Hafl^SoBle
Co., prominent bankers of Hamburg,
Germany, with liabilities that may
reach $7,500,000, was announced.1
II
cora»Ja»5t
TRANS-ATLANTIC
WIRELESS SERVICE
Glace Bay, N. S., Oct.
irgj^
The State Savings bank of Butte,
thepSf
principal stockholders,, suspended/
The officers say It is solvent. As the
result of these sensations the: stock
market was halting and Irregular,
but there was an apparent feeling
that the break of the attempted cor
ner in United Copper had cleared the-
ssr
r.T:
jCvrs-i
_— J. i?7 »c,.
cfi
tk
.ti?
W-
l-
Refused to:Stend'By Order.
fSS'
The suspension of Otto Heiiuse &'
Co., of which Max M. Schuitze is the"
stock exchange member, was based on
the exchange made by
1 Gross & ideeberg, the stock exchange
firm which failed Wednesday. In a',
communication to the president of
the stock exchange this firm charged
Otto Heinze & Co. with refusing to
accept ,3,202 shares of United Copper
said to have been bought on the or
der of the Heinze firm. This action.
Gross & Kleeberg state, was respon
sible for their' failure. Attorneys for
this firm stated yesterday that -the|||£
amount owing to the firm by the
Heinze firm aggregates $600,000. The
Heinze firm announced it Is perfectly
solvent and that all legal obligations
will be met.
18—The
in­
auguration of the regular trans-At
lantlc wireless 'service was accom
plished by William Marconi and as
sistants yesterday. Mr. Marconi stat
ed last night that more than S,000
words had been transmitted between
the stations at Port Morien, six
miles from here, and the Irish sta
tion.
Invitations to a large number ot
guests were issued for 2 o'clock in
the afternoon, but the world-wide
interest in the undertaking brought
a flood of messages in -the early
morning, and the service was opene^
after daylight
gh GO BACK AT 'FRISCO
ta Francisco, Cal., Oct 17.—Si»p
erintej^rteit Miller, of th^..^reste)cBi^
Union-Telegraph company/yrepor^
seven striking telegraph opei^toi
applied for their old positions y«
day. Five were given employmeu
Mi
W,
Mm

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