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The Aberdeen Democrat. (Aberdeen, South Dakota) 1???-1909, March 19, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn98069055/1909-03-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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FAMOUS CHICAGO MURDER
TRIAL CLOSED YESTERDAY
AFTERNOON
Acquitted 1
Sobs Like'
Declares
ny Thomp
terical in
«d Alibi
Chicago, 111., (Maroh. 18.—Dramat
ic scenes accompanied the acquittal
here today of Luman, C. Mann,
charged with the murder of Mrs.
Frances Gllmore Thompson last June
The evidence against Mann was cir
cumstantial his defense an alibi.
The Jury took but one ballot.
With the words "not guilty" from
the lips of the foreman the scene in
Judge M-cScurely's court became one
of excitement bordering on hyste
•rla.
"I've been a had man, but years
ifrom now you'll hear of me as an
.honest citizen," Maun said In thank
ing the Jury. Tears were rolling
'down his cheeks and his sobs made
it almost impossible for him to
•speak.
"We know you were Innocent,"
said one of the Jurors, unabashed,
tears flowing freely. Other Jurors
furtively applied handkerchiefs to
their eyes as Mann returned to his
mother, throwing his am about her
neck and crying like a child.
Woman, who have been constant
attendants at the trial, weeping and
all trying to talk at once, made a
nish for Attorney Erbstein,, who de
fendtvl Man^ SeveraS of tHeirr tried
to kiss him, add it Is said some of
them succeeded before he made his
escape. Meanwhile the bailiff was
shouting for order, to which lilobody
paid any attention.
Qrville C. CM&nn., father of the ac
quitted man, a wealthy and promin
ent resident of 'the suburb of Oak
Park, alone of the defendants'' fam
ily was not present. Worn, out by
the strain of the trial and the sus
pense, he was compelled to seek
medical aid and remained at home.
Under cross-examination the de
fendant was compelled'to relate a
story at which his mother hung her
head. He told of drinking bouts
during one of which he spent $1,000
In a single night, of gambling and
of low associates.
Fanny Thompson, 'bound, gagged
and the finger marks of a stranglnr
on her throat, was found dead In a
rooming house at 1244 Michigan
avenue on July 14th last. She had
been dead for four days, and this
period iMann was compelled to cover
in a minute detail to establish his
alibi. Besides himself he
produced
more than a score of witnesses.
w^psfSw
ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR
*s
2 af aks Down and
1
|id When Jury
)t Murder Fan
sr men. Go Hys
efendant PrOv-
Ml:
MRS. HARRY WENTZY
DIES AT RAPID CITY
Sapid City, 9. D.,March 18.—
Mrs. Harry Wentzy died here this
morning after an illness of but sev
en days. A child was born to Mr.
and Mrs. Wentzy on March 10th,
but the little one idled shortly after
birth. !ttr. Wentzy Is the editor and
owner of the Gate City Guide here
and Is the owner of the Press-Re
porter at Pukwona, thlB state. He
was formerly democratic state chair
man.
mi
DOPED, HE SAYS, ROBBED
Two Arretted in the Black Hills for
Giving Knockout Drops.
Deadwood,S.U., March 18.4—
Chargedwith "doping" and robbing
Bdward Sharpe, a lumberjack from
West Nahant, Stem Connors and Torn
Jones were bound over to the circuit
court and will be tried here, Sharpe
•saysthe men administered knookout
drops that resulted In an Ulnest ap
proaching death, and that while in
that condition he
wm
robbed of hii
money and placed on a tmln for lili
111
N0IVERDICT YETMS
IN COOPER CASE
ftfel
r* if
Feeling Growing Stronger That Jury
Will Be Unable to Decide and
That Mistrial Will Result—Judge
Will Not Receive Verdict Until
Today Should One Be Reached Be
fore.
-Uf
Nashville, Tenn., March 1.8.—An
other day paraed and no Intimation
of a.n agreement came from the room
in which twelve men are trying to
decide the fate of Colonel D. B. and
Robin Cooper and John D. Sharp for
the murder of .Former United States
Senator B. W. Cairo ack. This is'the
Second day of suspense and the feel
ing iB growing that there will be a
disagreement. Counsel on both
sides, however, as well as the court,
hold that there will be a verdict.
The Jurors went to supper at six
o'clock this evening, ate in silence
and hurried back to the big room
to resume their deliberations. Each
time that they leave the room, they
lock the door and one of their num
ber carries the key. Judge Hart re
mained at the court house until
noon. He then left and commun
icated with Sheriff Borum by tele
phone twice during the aftiernoon,
once at 2:45 and again at 5:16.
Upon the latter occasion he told the
sheriff that even if the Jury peach
ed a decision he would not receive it
before 9 a. m. tomorrow,
BURKE TO GET OLD BERTH
May Be Returned to Committee on
Interstate and Foreign Com
y^^oierce
Washington, D. C., March 18.—
The selection 'by Speaker Cannon
yesterday of Representative Cush
man of Washington as a member of
the committee on ways and means Is
taiken here to forecast the return of
Representative Burke^of South
i»T
Da­
kota to the committee on Interstate
and foreign commerce. Mr, Burke
was
a
member of that committee for
several congresses.
It is known that Speaker Cannon
wanted to place Burke on the ways
and means committee in place of
Bonynge of Colorado. It is under
stood, however, that Burke expres
sed a preference for his old commit
tee' berth, and, as Cushman was
being pressed for the place on the
way and means, he was transferred
from the Interstate committee to
make room for Burke.
ABANDON PARTY LINES
House Members Will Fight For Tar'
mz iffi Helping Own District
•?. Washington, D. C.,. March 18.—
That party lines will be elimliiated
during the consideration In the
house of the of the Payne tariff bill
was: Indicated by theactlon of Re
presentative Broussardi of loulsianh,
in withdrawing today from the. meet
ing. With few exceptions eachniem
ber oftfcs house will flghtforthe
ABERDEEN, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 1909
IT NEVER RAINS BUT WHAT IT POURS.
ROOSEVELT TELLS* NEIGHBORS
liK WILL RETURN lit VRAH
AND A QUARTER
4",
£K
in
Ex-President Addressed 250 of His
Neighbors Preparatory to Embark
ingifor Africa-^SayTHe WiltDis?
prove Prof. Starr's Gloomy Proph
esies—Will Celebrate With Neigh
bors on'His Return,
Oyster Bay, N. Y., March" 18.—
Theodore Roosevelt thia afternoon,
received at his home on Sagamore
Hill "Roosevelt/s" neighbors of Nas
sau county, N. Y., a delegation of
250 prominent men, republicans and
democrats whom he had planned to
receive at the White House on
March 3, but who failed on account
of the storm to reach Washington
in time. To them the former pres
ident, from the veranda of his home,
made his last public utterances prior
to his departure for Africa. His re
marks were mainly of appreciation
of the vlBlt, Ibut he assured them
that he Intends to disprove the
gloomy forebodings of Prof." Starr,
who declared that Mr. Roosevelt wW
not come out of Africa' alive If he
follows the itinerary he had mapped
out. He promised ttibBe present If
he proved he lB right, that in a year
and a quarter they would celebrate
together. From this remark It ap
pears that Mr. Roosevelt will be ab
sent from the United States no lon
ger than fifteen months.
Interests of his home district. There
is little prospect of any lengthy gen
eral debate on the bill and the con
sideration of the measure under the
five minute rule for amendment will
be proceeded with as soon as pos
sible, probably by the end of the
present week.
LOUISVILLE TO HAVE
NEW UNION DEPOT
Louisville,
Ky., Jiarch
loss of |400,000 of
the
Crossed wires are bellev«& to
be responsible for the blaze which
has made an empty shell of the de-'
pot ibefore the entire fire department
of the city, which was called, lud
arrived.
DEMENTED MAN
DRAWS BIG CROWD
Elihu Alley of Loyalton Escapes
From Samaritan Hospital and
%anders Through Streets Wnir
Naked and Barefoot—Man Arrest
ed and Restored to Hospital For
Treatment.
^Yesterday morning about 8 o'clock
a man was seen walking down: Main
street partly naked and barefooted,
a crowd of boys and curious ones
following. Officer Kirley appeared
tfn the scene -and'-toclf the nutii 'lntb
custody as it was plainly evident
that he was irresponsible.
Upon investigation it was found
that the man was Elihu Alley of
Loyalton, who was brought to the
Samaritan hospital Wednesday night
on the .verge of delirium tremens.
In some way he escaped in a half
dressedd condition and wandere
about the streets until found by Of
ficer Kirley, as stated. The man Is
again receiving treatment at the
Samaritan hospital.
ALCOHOL CADSEs
OF RACE SUICIDE
IS
Washington, D. C., March 18.—
Alcohol is the cause of race suicide
among animals, declared Dr. W.
18.—By tie. companies in this vicinity
the destruction here tonight at a.ship a. large, amount of cattle
Union depot,[year. ,The Indians own thousands
the local terminal for five of the:of cattle on the ranges near here,
country- chief railroads, Louisville and the loss for the winter among
will probably be benefitted by a new
union station. This was decided to
night by the Commercial Club, half
an hour after the building at Sev
enth street and the Ohio River was
a mass of smoking embera and deb
rlB.
IPKl
iSSwi
S.
Hall of Chicago, in pointing out to
day that It .cannot be considered a
food, In an address before the Ame
rican Society for the Study of Al
cohol and Other Narcotics. Dr.
T.
A. Williams of this city took a fling
at alcohol when he declared that
the mother who gratifies every cap
rice of the child to keep .him quiet,
and the father who studies every
form of amusement to attract and
interest his 'boy, are cultivating In
ebriety in it which will develop in
the future with the slightest excit
ing causes.
S8*
SHIPPING CATTLE TO ttAUffEB
8. D. Kstnres, However, May Be
Opened to Settlement in Spring
Wakpala, S. D., March 18.—Stock
men report that this has ibeen an
exceptionally good winter for their
business. Ih Spite of the probable
opening of their large pastures to
settlement next spring, the big cat-'
wlfi
this
the Indian herds Is only fourteen.
The appraising commission, con
sisting iof Bates of Pine Ridge, Ar
chambault of Bullhead and--Stone of
Hillendale, N, D., has been ordered to
organize March 20 and commence
appralBiug the lands to be opened
to
settlement at once. The members
of
the commission will receive a salary
of $10 a day each, and are allowed
clerfcb, teamsters, etc. They must
complete their work in six months.
FIRST MATTER TO RECEIVE AT
TENTION IS BILL FOR 1STH
CENSUS
Measure Passed As Roosevelt Want
ed, Giving Civil Service Power to
Appoint Clerks—Tariff Bill Offl
oially Reported—Demoorats Are
Coming Half Way to Support Re
publicans.
Washington,
D.
mentB
C., March
18.—
The first piece of legislation to be
acted on by the house during the
special session was the iblU provid
ing for the taking of the thirteenth
e^s^s, which wias passed, in Its
v.*ifeit fans the measure gives to
the' civil service commission Juris
diction over appointment and pro
vides for the printing of the reports
by the government printing office
As enacted at the last session the
bill stripped the civil service com
mission of such authority and there
was a provision .allowing some of
the printing to be done by private
firms, because of which President
Roosevelt vetoed It. A further
endaaent was made whereby appoint
are to be apportioned pro
rata among the states.
The tariff bill as officially report
ed to the house from the committee
on ways and means and Is now ready
for consideration.
Unless a "gag" rule, for this pre
vention of unlimited amendment un
der the five minute rule Is brought
in, the minority members of the
•ways and.means committeq wllL.not
report a' separate bill. Their report
will be drafted by Minority Leader
Clark, and will severely criticise the
wool schedule in the new bill. It is
contended by the democrats that It
has not been cut sufllcienty to place
it on a revenue basis. There prob
ably will be numerous amendments
offered and heated discussions affect
ing them are anticipated.
The inheritance tax, Philippine
free trade. International revenue and
maximum and minimum features of
the new bill are endorsed by the
minority leaders, and there has been
much favorable comment upon the
measure by democratic congressmen.
Champ Clark today declared that he
had not had sufficient time to look
into its provisions to enable him to
comment upon them. It Is under
stood that the minority leaders fav
or the removal of the restrictions on
the quantity of sugar and tobacco
that can be admitted from the Phil
ippines free of duty. On the other
'hand, several southern democrats
are endeavoring to have the free
trade proposition amended so as to
exclude rice, their contention being
thiat rice could be sent from the
Philippines to the United States
markets and sold for two cents a
pound if admitted free from the is
lands. This, they say, would ruin
the rice Industry in this country.
A number of democrats will Join
with some republicans in favoring
the continuation of the duty asses
sed by the Dlngley bill upon lumber.
The fight for free lumber will be
headed by Champ Clark, It is un
derstood. He has frequently ex
pressed himself In bitter terms in re
gard to the lumber situation In this
country. During the tariff hear
ing he arraigned the lumber mag
nates an& delved deep Into the In
tricacies of stumpage and railroad
land grants. It is not thought there
will be any serious opposition to
the tariff placed on tea.
Oreat Britain and Prance prob
ably will be the first countries to
secure the benefit of the minimum
rates of duty named In the Payne
bill. As soon as the measure is en
acted Great Britain will secure the
minimum rates. According to the
committee's reports, made today.
Great Britain has been unable to se
cure the benefits of the reciprocal
trade arrangements provided for by
the Dingley bill although she has
treated this country with .fairness
and impartiality In her custom sets.
As a 'French trade agreement' With
the United States contains qo pro
vlslon
tor
If®
VOLUME 7—-NUMBER 88
SITUATION ALL OVER COUNTRY
GREW HOURLY WO|tp
YESTERDAY
Climax of Exciting Day Reached
When 5,000 Repairers and Lin*
men Refused to Join Stickers and
Clashes Hay Result—So Ear There
Has Been No Riotipg Bat Revo
lutionists Are Sympathetic).
Paris, March 18.—The entirs jftg
11c service Is paralyzed and business
both public and private Is In a con*
dltlon of inextricable ^confusion as a
result of the continue^ strike of
postal-and telegraph employees.
Throughout the day the situation
in the capital and the provinces
grew worse with every hour. The
undelivered letters number Into the
millions and not less than 300,000
telegrams were stacked up this af
ternoon awaiting distribution. Por
eign Incoming mails remain unsort
ed and only a small 'proportion of
the outgoing m^lls haye..been sent
away.
The climax of the strike was
reached tonight when five thousand
repairers, linemen and mechanics de
clined, to join the striken. These
were the last iremalning 'workmen
employed by the post admlnlstra
tion.
There was no indication at a late
hour tonight of a break in the dead
tack between the government and
its striking employees: The strlks
will be made the mibject of consider
ation..In the chamber ot^deputles to
morrow and a" solution of vtlMr pijbb-'
lem miy then be furnished.
A few days more of these, condi
tions and Paris wlll .be reduced al
most {o a state of siege so far as
food supplies are concerned. The
funds necessary for the smooth run
ning of the provincial trade.- are
hung up in the poatofflces and the
supply of eggs, milk, butter, meat
and country produce threatens speed
ily to cease.' Already numerous
merchants have been obliged to send
out agents to the provinces with
ready cash to obtain supplies. The
banks are withholding payment on
checks in the absence of advices
from their correspondents and pric
es at the stores are soaring.
So far there has been no riqtlng.
The real element of danger is to be
found in the threat of the General
Confederation of Labor, which is a
purely revolutionary organization,
and the railroad unions to declare
sympathetic strikes. sr
WAS BILLED BY THE
CAVING IN OF WELL
Lemmon, March 18.—L. R. Hays,
of Wolf Butte, in Perkins county.
Was killed by the caving in of a well
which he was diging. The well had
been sunk to a depth of 47 feet, and
Hays was digging in the bottom of
the well, while others, on the sur
face, were putting in the curbing.
The cave-in caused the curbing to
collapse and Hays' skull was crush
ed.
time after It has been abrogated by
either nation, ,France may receive
the benefit of the minimum rates of
the Payne bill as soon'' as It Is en
acted.
The matter being In the hands'
of the French government. France is
now revising her own' laws' on
maximum and iihinlmum basis and
its action regarding the national
trade relations between the two
countries, In. the future will be of
vast Importance In International af
fairs because of the fact'that Great
Britain will receive the benefit of.
the minimum rates of the Payne
tariff.
The ways and means oommlttee,
in Its report, estimates that the en
tire revenues to the government for
the fiscal year 1910 providing th*
Payne bill Is in operation, wlll be
1862,065,886. As a total
amount'
for which revenue will be requIrM
tor 1910
is
estimated
.701,
Its continuance tor any
at
fi
$872i82'li-
It Is claimed that th*-deficit
tor
1910 will
be about
110,009,008.
euce
ndiu
iW
a..^
Mo

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