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The Johnson City comet. (Johnson City, Tenn.) 1916-1917, April 05, 1917, Image 1

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JOHNSON CITY COME
4
Thirty-Third Year.
OHNSON CITY, TENNESSEE, THURSDAY, APRIL 5. 1917.
: x
Whole Number 1709
THE
1
SIGN BOI.il
COURT II ES
APRIL 7TH WAS CALLED OFF MY
TI1E MAGISTRATES
ANTI-BOND MEN 0PF05E
BUT LOSE WHEN IT WAS FI T TO
VOTE. LITTLE OTHER BI S-
"l.N'ESS TRANSACTED AT
MEETING THIS WEEK
. Following a lengthy argument by
counsel for the anti-bond advocates
and those favoring " the bonds, the
county court at a late hour Monday
afternoon, by a vote of 35 to 20, vot
ed to sign the bonds recently voted
by the people for $750,000 for road
purposes in the county. There are
reports circulated that Chairman
Home will not sign the bonds as chair
man of the court, but it is believed
that he will do so .
The court transacted but little oth
er business Monday except to call off .
the other bond election called for
April 7, and to discuss pro and con
the matter of wheather the court
should sign the bonds under the other
Issue. '
The court reconvened again TufS- !
day morning and the appropriation
docket was taken up and the various
tax levies was made.
REGIMENT OF DARE DEVILS
OFFERED BY COL CY LYLE
AVashington, March 31. Colonel Cy
H. Lyle, who put the Johnson City
Comet on the map and now is treasur
er of the Soldiers' Home at Johnson
City, has tendered his services to the
government with the offer to raise
a rgiraent. He says in a letter accom-j
panying his tender: I
"What a regiment of dare devils I
Colonel Lyle "was otday abvised by
the war department that his proffer
would be given consideration, and he
would be called in the event of
war if volunteers were needdd. His
telegram to the department reads:
"Newton D. Baker, Secretary of
War Washington, D. C:
"Born in the morning shadow of
Kongs Mountain whose heroes shat
tered the hopes of a foreign foe dur
ing the revolution. In desire to offer
you the services of a rglment of the
desendants of these sturdy pioneers.
With your permission, can be ready
to mobilize in thirty days. Refer to I
any member of Tennessee delegation
in congress.
"CY H. LYLE"
THE OFFICERS RESERVE
CORPS IS OPEN TO ALL
Washington, April 2. The grade of
second lieutenant in the officers' re
reserve corps of the army has been
thrown open by Secretary Baker to
men without any military experience
1 & 1 . 1 . . .1 n nA .1 Vl . ' f 1 f Q t - '
w naiever, ptuviuuu mcj im;on.ii
ly and entally adopted to military
life. An urgent plea has been sent
out to men between 21 and 32 years
all over the country to send in ap-
plications for commissions with lis-,
surances that the army will supply
.. .nrnllmoni ihB militarv trainine
necessary to fit them for duty.
11 1ISH WKST INDIES
vmy AMERICAN
, .
Washington, March 31. The final
act of more than fifty years' effort to
hrlna the Danish West Indies under
the American flag was completed with
formal ceremonies at the state depart-
ment today when uanisn luinisier
iJruu was handed a treasuly warrant
for $25,000,000, the purchase price,
and wireless messages were sent to
the American and Danish authorities
at the islands to lower the Danish flag
and raise the stars and stripes,
a nnnn today' the new possessions
passed definitely and finally under the
hu.uority of the United States.
SHIELDS AND M'KELLAR '
DECLARE IX FAVOR OF WAR
Washington, April 3 The assem
bling of the war congress yesterday
brought the entire democratic dele
gation to Washington. and the mem
bers will vote to a man to declare
that a state of war exists with Ger-
many.
"I will vote for war straight from
the shoulder" said Senator Shields,
and Senator McKellar was equally as
emphatic.
"If German aggression is not stop-
ped we must bow to tne uerman
yoke" said th junior senator.
OITORTUXITY FOR
YOUNG SOUTHERNERS
Atlanta, Ga., April 2. Opportunity
for ambitious young southern men,
university graduates preferred, to se
cure training which will fit them for
responsible positions in the Freight
Traffic Department of the Southern
Railway System is offered through
the apprentice squad which the South
ern has organized in its general frei
ght office at Atlanta. The squad is
now composed of eleven young men
and, as it will be kept up to this num
ber, openings for new members will
develop as present members are pro
moted to other positions.
Authorities of leading Southern uni
versities have been asked to recom
mend deserving young graduates who
may be listed for places on this squad
but applications of young men who
have only completed high school
courses but are otherwise acceptable
also will be given consideration.
At the start members of the squad
are paid. $-10.00 per month. After six
months' service the pay of those whos
progress has been satisfactory will be
advanced to $50.00 per month. After
that promotion will come to them as
they make themselves capable of fill
ing vacancies occurring in positions
ahead of them, all such promotions
being made on the 'basis of demon
strated fitness and ability.
"BROTHERS IN ARMS
SAYS LONDON
PRESS
London, April 3. "Under "Brothers
in Arms" the Pall-Mail Gazette says
today of President Wilson's speech:
"The president frames the issue in
a setting calculated to stir the deep
est emotions fo the American people,
The Russian
. .. . . . .
revolution enables nun
to commend it to them as a conflict
to them as a conflict .
between the virtues of democracy and
tho ,Hn, nf uutnrruov Amplira '
ontf-rs hP war without rpsprvn Hons. '
Her action will be welcomed both for
the substantial aid which she will
bring and for the community of spirit
which she will further among the
free nations of the world. It is great
satisfaction to be joined thus with
the nation carrying so much of our
blood in a crusade worthy of its best
traditions and ours."
ANTI-CIGARETTE
Nashville, April 3. The general as
sembly met again yesterday follow
ing adjournment last Saturday, and
began the closing week of the sixtieth
biennial session. All the rest of the
week It will be three sessions daily
morning, afternoon and evening.
Bills will now go to the. government
making it unlawful and punishable by
severe penalties for any physician or
surgeon to be guilty of "fee splitting," ,
making it unlawful to use, the United
Stntcs flag for any improper uses, and
making the Tennessee, Industrial
school a home-finding institution for
I abandoned and dependent children.
The senate passed on the third and
final passage a bill amending the anti
cigarette law by ' making it apply
only to minors and licensing the sale
of cigaretts. Heavy penalties are
inflicted for sales to minors. The
bill will, it is said, yield revenue ap-
proximal ing
state.
$75,000 a year to the
TENNESSEE RECRUITS
SENT TO FORT THO.V4S
Knoxville, March 31. Army recruits
f the Knoxville division, which cm-
.1 1 T .. . . .-, . , n nil
'"aces bihuuuo m ituucw on..
a portion 01 souwwesiern ftenu-cn,
anr now being sent to Fort Thomas
near Cincinnati instead of to Fort
Oglethorpe, Ga., on account of Uncle
Sam's barracks in the Cracker state
being occuplea ty me internea tars
of the ka'W- Although the recruits
are examined at the stations in the
division they are furtheu examined
when they reach Fort Thomas. The
number of applicants for enlistment
nas een mcreaseu tnunj nm-
......
DRANK RAY RI M
TWO ARE KILLED
Conway, Ark., March 31. Momer
Llewellyn, chauffeur, and Orfle Doug
i i:'S. mechanic, died here today, and
Andy Francis, a barber, hourly is ex-
pectcd to die as a result of drinking
I a gallon i nay rum, wiiicu me met:
bought for a "party" at Fransis' shop
The bay runl 18 said ,0 have contain-
ed a large per cent of wood alcohol
which caused the men's death.
HON A J VINES
Hon. Andrew J. Vines, who would
have been 81 years of age in a few
days, died "Tuesday at noon at his
home on the Jonesboro pike.
The funeral and burial took place
Wednesday auernoon ai me iamiiy
graveyard on tne piKe at .ju ociock
He was the father of James A., Brown
low, W. I., Noah, L. J., Elias Vines
ana airs, .uaiy viuvs nuu i.na. v.a.nj
.Taylor.
The Tennessee Sunday School Association has
designated Sunday, April 8th, as Go-tb-Sunday-School
Day, and Governor Rye has proclaimed and set aside
said day as Go-to-Sund ay-School Day for Tennessee.
A welcome awaits you in the various Sunday Schools.
CHAUTAUQUA
E
MIKADO LIGHT OPERA COMPANY
ALSO HILLED
ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THIS CITY
SHOWS NEW NOTE IN I'OPU
LAR PROGRAM RCILDING Bl'T
WITH SAME HIGH STAND
ARDS MAINTAINED
The Redpath program in this city
tnr 1117 hirrcroi. ami hpttar t-hnn pvcp
"aH "' neen announced .ram cnau-
tau(l,la headquarters in
Bristling With Compelling
Chicago.
interest
f r0 fll'st to last- this Pgl'am in
cludes such outstanding features as
the Mikado Light Opera company
of thirty .members and the great
Creatore and his band. Throughout
the week are more of what oge might
call popular numbers than usual, a
fact which will be acceptable to the
majority of the Chautauqua going pirt
lie. While some radical changes have
been made in the style and makeup
of the program, the same high stand
ard of attractions in maintained as in
fne prograiiT'of "past years. .-
Everybody likes a band. Since the
days when we followed our first cir
cus parade, to the pulse-stirring
strains of the uniformed band sitting
aloft in their gilded, palatial wagon
drawn by prancing horsefl, we have
never quite lost the magic thrill which
always returnes when we hear the
rousing strains of a good band. Crea
tore is one of the greatest band lead
ers our country has ever known
When the well-known Italian leader
first came to this country he was a
verifiable sensation. Dramatic pic
, turesque in his directing, and cy
I clonic in his energy, he was a marvel
I of emotional intensity and a revelation
of musical possibilities. He quickly
i became the rage. Crea tore's genius
I lay , not only in his singular ability
. to impart to his men the contagion of
his vivid emotions, but also in his un
usual mastery of instrumentation.
Creatore has had a striking influ
ence in the development of band
music in this country. When he comes
to the chautauqua for the closing day
it is safe to say he will be greeted
by a crowd that will tax the capacity
of the tent.
Many people are very apt to regard
grand opera as high brow something
. 1. .. . . 1 a A 1 i . 1 1 . . i
mai Hiu.etus iu me iew ramer man in
many, lie this as it may, light opear
appeals to all classes.
Gilbert and Sullivan's Mikado,
which is scheduled for another of the
seven days, is one of the most tune
ful and refreshingly humorous light
operas ever written. It is easily im
derstood and uproarously funny from
start to finish. No composers of
light opera in English have ever ap-
proached the subtle charm and the
imriimg uiuswy oi unuen ana ui
livan.
They will live as long as opera
lasts.-
MINISTERS OF H0L8T0N
ASSOCIATION ORGANIZED
The ministers of the Holston asso
ciation met in .the Central Baptist
church here Monday and organized a
conference to meet once each month
ti win nieei on monaay ai 11 O CIOCK
following each First Sundav. - Rev E.
K. Cox, of Kingsport is chairman,
and Rev. J. N. Monroe, of this city
Is secretary. Topics of vital interest
will be discussed at each meeting.
HOME OF
ROBERTEI.ROD
BURNS AT OKALONA
"The home of Robert Elrod was de
stroyed by fire last Friday at Okalona
two miles south of Johnson City. The
enure contents were burped, together
witn tne nome. There was no insur-
ance. Mr. Elrod will rebuild at once.
He has the sympathy of the commun-
im j.nie m neip mm to re-
duuu and rurnisft his home. .
mm ca
' NEXT FALL
MIGHT RE -THE DECIDING FACTOR
IN THE WAR
10 FOLLOWS Him
MAY HE AS GREAT PATRIOT AS
THE ONE. WHO GOES TO
TRENCHES. TIIF.' PLOW
A POTENT VIKU'OX
.ii st no it;
In modern war. the ylvvr is as po
tent a ' weapon as thf inch gun.
The man'Vho follows 4-1 urrov piay
be as 'gieat a patriot t,f the one who
goes to the trenches, if he does not
choose to perform the former task
simply to evade the hardships and
.tangcrs of the latter. - -.
One of the very greatest . contribu
tions which the people of the United
States can make to the .cause of civ
ilization in its war against Germany
is a bumper crop at next fall's har
vest. This is vital importance not only
to our own people but to the people
of the nations with which wc are
about to make common cause against
Germany, We have, been notoriously
lax in our agrcullural methods up to
aow because we have never faced the
accessity which now confronts us.
This necessity calls not only for
ample food for our own people, but
the largest possible surplus for ship
ment to the entente allies.
An increase of 10 per cent in the
total crops of the United States this
year, as compared with a normal year
would mean millions of tons of food.
Thorw this food into the scales agains
Germany and it might well be the
deciding factor in the world war.
It seems as thou it ought to be
easy to accomplish this when one
considers the vast extent of the un
tilled lands lnevery section of the
country and also that in few sec
tions has intenseive cultivation been
systematically carried out.
The farmers of the nation have a
wonderful opportunity if they have
the will to take advantage of it.
In a lesser degree city dwellers and
suburbanites have a like opportunity
In every city, suburb and village there
is more or less unused land, most of
which would yield splendid crops of
vegetables.
It is amazing what results a com
bination of muscle, spade and hoe can
achieve in a back lot in an hour a
day during the planting and growing
season.
EAST TENNESSEE
SOLDIER
MAKES GOOD
Bulletins from Schofleld Barracks
Honolulu, Hawal, received today.
State Sergeant Rufus Taylor, Q. M.
Corps ro-enlisted Feburary 5th 1917,
and his warrant as Sergeant continu
ed in force. This is a favored posi
tion with high rate of pay and illus
trates the development of the colord
soldier given opportunity. Sergeant
Taylor enlisted at Johnson City, Tenn.
in 1901 and is a success in his chosen
profession.
A second item states, Wesley H.
Murphy, who enlisted at Johnson City
Tenn., May 20th 1915. Transferred
from Co., E 25th Infantry. (Colored
Regiment) to Quartermaster Corps,
Promoted to corporal school teacher
and directed to report to Chaplain
25th Infantry, for duty,
1
THEME
IIIAT STATE OF MAR NOW EX
ISTS BETWEEN AMERICA
AND GERMANY
SPEECH 15 DISPASSIONATE
HUT IS UNMEASURED DEN0UNC1A
TIOX OF THE COURSE OF THE
GERMAN GOVERNMENT IN
ITS PRESENT METHOD
OF RUTIILESSNESS
Washington, April- 2. President
Wilson tonight urged congress as
sembled in joint session, to declare a
state of war existing between the
United States and Germany.
In a dispassionate, but unmeasured
denunciation of the course of the
Imperial German government, which
he characterized as a challenge to all
mankind and a warefare against all
nations, the president declared that
neutrality no longer was feasible, or
desireable where the peace of the
world was involved; that armed neu
trality had become ineffectual enought
at best and was Hkey to produce
what it was infant to movent and
urged that congress accept the gauge
of battle with" all the recources of the
nation.
"I advise that the congress declare
the recent course of the Imperial
German government to be in fact
nothing less than war against the gov
eminent and people of the United
States," said the president, "that it
formally accept the status of bellig
erent, which has thus been thrust
upon it and that it take steps not only
to put the country in a more thorough
State of defense, but also to exert all
its power and employ all its resour
ces to bring the government of the
German empire to terms and end the
war."
When the president had finished
speaking resolutions to declare a stat
of war existing were introduced in
both House of Congress, referred to
appropriate committees, and will be
debated tomorrow. There is no doubt
of their passage.
The objects of the United States in j
entering the war, the president said, j
were to vindicate the priciples of (
neace and justice against "selfish and
autocratic power." Without selfish
ends, for conquest or dominion, seek
ing no indemnities, or material cob-
...... ,H.. no fni- tho OQI-lifipPS It Shall
make, the United States must enter j
the war, the president said, to make (
the world safe for democracy as only
one of the champions of the rights of
mankind, and would be satisfied when
those rights were secure as the faith
and freedom of nations could make
them. i
JAMES JUNE COLORED
DIED SUDDENLY SATURDAY
James June, aged 55, a colored
laborer, died very suddenly at or
near John Horton's place late Satur
day afternoon, heart trouble being
the cause of his death. It was at
first thought that he had met wi,th
foul play and an investigation was
made these reports being without
foundation according to physicians.
June seems to have come to Johnson
City from near Columbus, . C, al
though efforts to locate his relatives
have proved a failure. His remains
were interred Monday.
DON'T NEGLECT YOUR COLD
Neglected colds get. worse, instead
of better. A stuffed head, a tight
chest must be relieved t onace. Dr.
Bell's Pine-Tar-Honey is Nature's
remedy. Honey and glycerine heal
the irritated membrane, antiseptics
tar loosens the phlegm, you breath.?
easier and your cold is broken up.
Pleasant to take, Dr. Bell s Pine-'i ar-.
Honey Is an Ideal remedy for cliil-(
tlrcn as well as grown-ups. At your.
Druggist, 25c. v J
to srrroRT increased
UXMBERS OF STOCK
Washington, April 3. Aopri;vt
grazing allowances for the NatmnV
Forest during the coming season pro
vided for the pasturing of 8,400,15.'.
sheep. 2,120,115 cattle and horses, and
51,680 swine. These figures, com
pared with those of last year, repre
sent an approximate Increase of 1 i 1 .
000 cattle and horses and a decrease
of about 200,000 sheep. Grazing ex
perts of the Forest Service figure
that for purposes of range allotment
one'eow' is equal to five sheep. Con
sequently the increase of 111 ,o'0 cat
tle and horses is held to be equival
ent to a net increase of 355,000 sheep,
or of 71,000 cattle, over the total num
ber of stock grazed last year.
The decrease in the number of
sheep is said to be caused by the ac
tion of owners who are disposing of,
their flocks in order to buy cattle.
HART FUNERAL
HELD SUNDAY
After an illness of more than a
year's duration, B. Frank Hart, died
at his home on .Myrtle avenue Satur
day night at 6:30 o'clock. While his
death had been expected for some the house tomorrow,
time, yet his many friends regret it. I The war resolution was passed by
For the past year Mr. Heart nought, the Benate tonight by a vote of 82
treatment in the best hospital.) and ; to 6. It goes to the house where
sanitariums of the country but to no ' debate will begin tomorrow morning
avail, he having gradually grown 'at 10 o'clock to continue until action
worse until death ended his su ffer-! i iaken.
ings. Senators who cast the negative
Mr Hart was son of the lute Rev. ' votes were: Gronna, North Dakota;
A. P. Hart', who was one of the early j LaFollette, Wisconsin; Nonis, Ne
citizens of Johnson City. Mi. Hart braska; Lane, Oregon; Stone, .Mis-
was forty-four years of age nnd was
diirina his life time eneaeed in the
paper-hanging business here. He was
a member of the local lodge of Elks.
He was well known and had many
friends. He is survived by a widow , thrust upon the United States by Ger
and four children, two sons and two many is formally declared, and directs
daughters. ne president to employ the entire
Funeral services were conducted at military and naval forces and the re
the residence Sunday afternoon by sources of the government to carry
Rev J. M. Einert, pastor of the First ' 011 war anA 1)l inS it to a successful
M. E. church. A large number of termination.
friends and neighbors were in at- I Action in the senate came just after
tendance.. At Oak Hill cemetery, U o'clock at the close of a debate that
where interment was made, the Elks lasted continuously since 10
conducted the services in a most im- ( o'clock this morning. The climax was
pressive manner. The floral tributes reached late in the afternoon when
were beautiful. Senator- John Sharp Williams de-
Frank Hart was not only one of ; nounced a speech by Senator LaFol-th-e
fiRee-i-pfeiKH tingr 4iv.-,lie. south ! l.rttc....a... more worthy of Herr yon.
being an attest at decorating, but he'Betbmann Hellweg than of an Arner-
was exceedinkly well known in base
ball circles.
inactlvily Causes Cotisdpr 'i n
Lack of exercise in the win er is a
frequent cause of constinacit-a.
feel heavy, dull and listV.-s.
complexion is sallow and piim ly
energy at low ebb. Clean up Un.1:
dition at once with Dr. Kin,"'
Life Tills, a mild laxa'ive ti n:
Yon
and
eoil-
.ev,
re-
lieves the congested inlfstini-,i w;tb
out griping. A dose before reii:ing
will assure you a full and easy move
ment in the morning. 2'n: ai ymr
Druggist.
MY NEIGHBOR BROWN
WHO GOES TO TOWN
I have aneighbor. Fanner Brown,
v. h ) thinks that he must go to town,
come warm or cold, conic wet or dry,
till time to plant spring crops is nigh.
A jolly, kindly man is lie, but w antes
bis time most recklessly. Hie troughs
are broken, fences poor; a rail props
up the front barn door. Out in the
fields his tools repose through all the
winter rains and snows; if patching
up weak parts require, he docs the
job with bailing wire. No clover
grows within his fields; no winter
greens his garden yields the pigs
have rooted down the gates his oats
are thin from sowing late. His horses
plainly something lack; the .bones
stick up all down their back, and all
their ribs most plainly show-r-oh, say
a hundred yards or so.
Such is my neighbor Farmer Brown
who spends his winter days in town,
talking hard times in shops and store
while his poor wife does up the chores
JUDSON STOCK.
In Southern Agriculturalist.
MINISTERS APPOINTED TO
VISIT SCHOOLS IN APRIL
1
The Pastors' Union has designated
the following ministers of the city to
visit the city schools during the
month of April: High school, Rev.
George Green; State Normal, Rev J.
M. Crowe; Martha Wilder, Rev L. D.
Riddell; Columbus Powell, Rev. J. L.
MacMillan; West Side, Rev. J. M.
Emert; State Normal, Rev. W. A.
Jonnard. The principal of the schools
are requested to call the minister on
the day they wish him to visit the
school.
REV. H. C. CLEMENS.
WANTED 20 to 10 acres good farm
land within four miles Johnson City,
W. B. Ellison, Slack Building, John
son City. 1 j
THE i
RESOLUTION
GIVES PRESIDENT ALL POWER TO
WAGE AGGRESSIVE WAR
DEBATE RESCUES CLIiX
WHEN SENUOR WILLIAMS AS
SAILS LAFOLLETTE VOTE
WAS S3 TO C IN FAVOR OF
THE ME SURF
Washington April 4. The resolu
tion declaring that a state of war
exists between the United States and
Germany was passed in the senate to
night by an overwhelming majority.
It will be taken up for passage in
:'"''. n' Nanlaman, Mississippi.
Tlic resolution, drafted after con-
sultation with the State Department
and already accepted by the house
J committee, says that the state of war
lean senator.
ARMY AND NAVY
ARE NOW READY
Washington, April 3. Army and
navy preparations were believed by
officials last night to have reach a
stage guaranteeing against all imme
diate defense needs and insuring that
the more sweepig steps congress is
expected to authorize can be carried
out promptly.
REV GREEN TO INSTALL
DR WILSON IN KNOXVILLE
Rev. George Green, pastor of the
Central Baptist church, will ga, to
Knoxville .Tuesday to attend the in
stallation services of Dr. Loyd T.
Wilson, who is to become pastor of
the Broad way Baptist church of that
city. Dr. Green will conduct the in
stallation services.
RED CROSS SOCIETY
SENDS OFF CHARTER LIST
The local Red Cross Society sent
off their Charter list of members Sat
urday, the local organization list
numbering one hundred members.
Keen interest was manifested here
during the organization of the society.
O'DON NELL-ELLIOT
Sunday morning at 10:30 o'clock at
the home of Frank Graham Judge W.
C. Pierce performed the ceremony
which united in marriage John J.
O'Donnell and Miss Laura Ezella El
liott. The wedding was a quite af
fair and only a few friends were in
attendance. Mr. O'Donnell, is a son
of Thomas O'Donnell of this city, and
for some time has been located at
Klizabethton. Mrs. O'Donnell is a
daughter of Mr. T. J. Elliott a promi
nent Elizabethton citizen. Mr, and
Mrs. O'Donnell will reside in Eliza
bethton. STIFF, SORE MUSI LES RELIEVED
Cramped muscles or soreness fol
lowing a cold or case of grippe are
eased and relieved by a napplication
of Sloan's Liniment. Does not stain
the skin or clog the pores like mussy
ointments or plasters and penetrates
quickly without rubbing. Limber up
your muscles after exercise, drive out
the pains and aches of rhumatism,
neuralgia, lumbago, strains, sprains
and bruises witji Sloan's Liniment.
Get a bottle today. At all Druggists,
25c. '
Babies don't mind cold or t'nke cold
if kept well with Dr. Fabrney's Teeth
lng Syrup. Get it anywhere.. Sam
ple free.
J

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