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The Johnson City comet. (Johnson City, Tenn.) 1916-1917, April 26, 1917, Image 1

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JOHNSON CETY COMET
Thirty -Third Year.
JOHNSON CITY, TENNESSEE, THURSDAY. APFIL 26, 1917.
Whole Number 1712
nibmariee Down
-j
Sends
First Shot of War
HI SUBMARINE SUNK
BY 1 Mil STEIEfj
SHOT IS FIRED AT ONE '11101-
SAND YARDS 1ST STEAMSHIP
MONGOL!
GUNNERS WORK PRAISED
GUN THAT DOES WORK HAD BEEN
NAMER THEODORE
ROOSEVELT
London, April 25. Captain Rice, of
the American Steamship Mongolia,
which has arrived at a British port,
told the Associated Press today that
the Mongolia had fired the first gun
of the war for the United States and
sunk a German submarine.
The periscope was sighted dead
ahead on the last afternoon of the
voyage. The captain gave the order
for full speed ahead with .the inten
tion of ramming the submarine.
The periscope disappeared and a
few minptes later reappeared on the
ship's broadside. The gunners fired
hitting the periscope squarely and
throwing up a mountain of water.
Captain Rice outlined the incident
with modesty, but could not quite con-
ceal the pride he felt in the achieve-
ment of his ship. He paid a high trib '
. . , . , , .
ute to the gunners and especially to
the manner in which they were han
dled by the officer who directed the
firing of the telling shot.
"For five days and nights," said
Captain Rice, "I have not had my
clothes off and we kept a. 'big force
of lookouts on duty all the time. It
..was 5:20 o'clock in the afternoon on
the 19th that we sighted the submar
ine, ujlie,; officer cojiimandjBg-..tlie-Sitrtnerg'was
with" me on the bridge
where In fact we had been the most
of the time throughout the voyagp. j
There was a haze over the sea at the
time. We had just taken a sounding,
. for we were getting near shallow
water and were looking at the lead
when the first mate cried:
There's a submarine off the port ,
bow.
."We were going at full speed ahead
and two minutes after we first sight
ed the U-boat it emerged again about
1,000 yards off. Its intention probab
ly had been to catch us broadside on,
but when 1t appeared we had the stern I
gun trained full on it.
"The lieutenant gave the command
and the big guns boomed. We saw
the periscope shattered and the shell
and the submarine disappeared.
"I assure you we did not stop to re
connoiter after the incident, but steam
ed away at full speed, for it was not
improbable that , there was another
submarine about. The one I got un
doubtedly had been lying on the bot
tom at this spot waiting for the ship
and came up when she heard our pro-
pellors. I Immediately sent a wire
less message stating that a submar
ine had been seen.
"The gunners had named the guns
on board the Mongolia and the one
which got the submarine was called
Theodore Roosevelt; so Teddy fired
the firs gun of the war after all."
Captain Rice recalled that he canu
from Allston Mass., and that the en
counter with the submarine occurred
on the date when the Bay State was
celebrating the anniversary of the bat
tie of Lexington.
The Mongolia was going at full
speed and was a long distance away
when the spray and foam subsided,
but from the bridge the officers ob
served the spot through their glasses
and they are confident the submarine
was sunk.
For Election to be Held in Johnson
CUy, Tenii, on Saturday
May 5, 1917.
First Ward Officer, W. D. Boring;
judges F. M. Lewis. H. R. Farrott,
N. D. Shell; Clerks. Ralph H. Pouder,
Sam Fureell. '
Second Ward Officer, F. B. St.
John; judges, C. L, Marshall. -Paul B.
Carr, J. Stanley Barlow; Clerks, H.
W. Johnson, Oscar M. Fair.
This April 24th 1917.
J. R. Worley, Chairman,
P. II. Wofford, Secretary,
It. C. Thomas,
Commissioners of Election, Washing
ton County, Tennessee.
IS
HAS DESPERATE CHASE WITH
GERMAN SHIP OFF THE
BRAZILIAN COAST
New York, April 23. An American
steamship was chased for five miles
by the German sea raider Seeadler
off the coast of Brazil April 12, ac
cording to the captain of the vessel
which reached this port today. The
Seeadler, previously reported by the
victims of her raids on their arrival
at Rio Janeiro, Was formerly the
American bark Pass of Balmaha, in
which the Germans had fitted gaso
line motors.
Tho captain of the steamship which
is engaged in the South American
trade, said the raider was sihgted at
G o'clock in the morning, bearing
down on him at a point 33 miles north
of tha equator, and between 200 and
300 miles off the coast. The pursuer,
he said, put on all. speed, making
about 13 knots an hour. As this was
slightly less than his own vessel's
speed, he was able to throw her off
after a desperate chase.
Ai.!,.-..,.i . j.- t j
Although within range, the raider
AiA .lt nttmtlf . . . c.
... nrv III. IMJ (Illll 11IIO
had Norwelgan flags painted on her
side, he said, and mounted two guns,
apparently of eight inch calibre. This
Is the first report of the operations
of the Seeadler since crews from ships
she sank reached Rio Janeiro March
til.
THREE KILLED
Birmingham, Ala., April 24. Three
powder workers met death today when
an explosion of black powder occured
in the Coalburg plant of the Aetna
Explosives Company. 12 miles north
of here. Cause of the blast has not
been determined tonight. An investi
gation is in progress.
The explosion demolished a small
power press building in which the
three victiins were working.
IF
FIRST TENNESSEE
Nashville, April 25. Col. Harry Ber
ry, of the First Tennessee regiment,
announces that he expects to have
the entire regiment In camp at Bell
Meade by Friday. He issued an or
der yesterday afternoon for the sani
;ary detachment to leave Memphis
Tuesday night. This corps will assist
n the physical examinations of re
cruits, beginning Wednesday morning
Examination of the Nashville recruits
will begin Tuesday morning at 8
clock at the armory. Col. Berry
iaid he thought this would be com
peted in time for all of the Nashville
batallion to be in camp by Wednes
day. " .
The sanitary detachment ordered
'rom Memphis is under the command
of Maj. Dunavant and includes medi
cal officers.
CHARGED WITH RECRUITING
SOLD.ERS TO FIGHT l
S.
Waco, Tex., April 23. After hear
ing testimony today United States
Commissioner McCormick fixed a,
bond of $10,000 for John Schronk,
wealthy farmer, charged with re
cruiting soldiers to eugage in armed
hostility against the United States.
Schronk is 74 years old and has lived
in this country for sixteen years. He
has applied for naturalization pa
pers. Earl Jones who is in Memorial
hospital with an attack of pneumon'a
is reported to be rapidly improving.
RICHARD 110YLE KILLED
London, April 23. Richard Bernard I
Boyle, seventh earl of Shannon, has!
been killed in action. He was a lieu )
tenant of the Royal Fusileers.
t
mum m
IS CELEBRATED
STARS AND STRIPES UNFURLED
FROM EIFFEL TOWER
MONDAY
FORTY THOUSAND AMERICAN
FLAGS ARE HANDED OCT
GRATIS HY COMMITTEE
Paris April 22. The Stars and
Stripes were flung to the breeze from
Eiffel tower at 2 o'clock this after
noon and saluted by twenty-one guns.
This marked the opening of the cere
monies .of "United States Day" in
Paris. The French trl-colors and the
Star Spangled Banner were at the
name hour unfurled together from the
residence of Wm. G. Sharp, the Amer
ican ambassador, in the Avenue
d'Eylau, from the American embassy
from the city hall and from other
municipal government buildings.
It was great day for the Red, White
and Blue. Over all the capital street
venders did a thriving trade in the
colors of both allies, while 40,000
Americari'flags, handed out gratis by
the committee, were waved by the peo
pie who thronged the vicinity of the
manifestations.
While cannon boomed in honor of
the American colors floating from the
lop of Eiffel tower and aviators, fly
ing over the spot, waived both French
and American flags, the Star Spangl
ed Banner was sung by Mile. Nina May
of the opera comque, and the "Mar
seillaise" by Jean Note of the opera.
Ambassador Sharp and his escort
were received at 3 o'clock at the city
hallby tne"iiiembers of the municipal
council, by Marcel Delanney, perfect
of the Seine; E. Laurent, perfect of
police; Premier Ribot, Georges Des
plas, minister of public works; Jules
A. Stcug, minister of public instruc
tion; Capt. Andre Tardieu high com
missioner to the United States, and
other distinguished persons.
Sharp Is Welcomed
Andrien Mithouard. president of the
municipal council of Paris, in a speec
welcomed Ambassador Sharp, who re
sponded briefly, acknowledging the
honors paid to the United States by
the people of Paris. The speech was
greeted with great applause.
A plaquette representing "Liberty
Enlighting the World," after the stat
ue of Bartholdi, protected by Amer
ican eagle, was presented to Ambas
sador Sharp as a memento of the
occasion. j
SEVERELY INJURED
Freeling, Va., April 25. Edward
Pyle, foreman on the Currier lumber
works was seriously if not fatally
hurt by a wrecking dummy on the
narrow gauge road, near Norland. Sev
eral severe gashes were sustained
about the head, and it is thought the
man suffered a fracture of the skull.
He was taken to a hospital at Jen
kins Ky.
GERM ANT'S METHODS
DECEIVING HER PEOPLE
Attribute to ..England ..Designs That
Were Never Entertained
' London, April 24. A war office
statement issued tonight says:
"The GiUmau official statement re
ceived by wirless today afforded a
remarkable instance of the methods
the enemy is now adopting to ex
plain away his defeat and encourage
the German people. These methods
consist in attributin to us designs
we have never entertained, then
proving that they have failed com
pletely. "Neither on the 9th of April nor on
the 23rd dtd we attempt to break
through the German lines in the
sense conveyed in the German corn-
nninication. The objects in each I
rase was limited. On both occasions
gained the objects assigned to
lb attacking troops."
D. R. Beeson. who has fccen In Er-
win for a few days, has returned to
the ctty.
U ft-
1
IS TAKEN BP
DATA IS GIVEN COMMITTEE HY
SECRETARY HOUSTON
AND OTHERS '
ASKS FOR FULL CONTROL
THE SECRETARY CAN EE
REAL REASON FOR
BCSHEL WHEAT,'
NO
Washington, April 26.--Congress
took up the food problem-In public
hearings by the senate agriculture
committee at which SecretayHouston
set forth the administration's foood
control program. .
At the same time the Federal Trade
Commission, directed by t President
Wilson to investieate with- the Ami -
cultural Department the-j causes of
high food prices,
asked 'ml State
Governors to send remesenta. ives to '
Washington April 30 for a-conference
i
1
on state co-operation in theUnquiryJ
Before appearing at the f committee
hearing Secretary ' Houstin put his
plans before the heads of kive of the
B
country's big farmers' organizations
and received assurance of fi.nnort for
any measures the government contem
nlates for Keltine a firmer exasn on!
fond i.rmliictinn and HiatriWinn Tho
farmers' representatives promised
even to give their endorsement to
i,it.i.,f ;,.i .
power to fix maximum and minimum
prices in emergency. C ";
To Mobilize !ioja
As its part in he jgovernment's
plans the Department 6t Labor an
nounced that it had undertaken the
.,..,.... .jm.i.j
out the country as active farm
fnr tho B,,mmr tn nr.,i.tim
United States boys' working reserve.
Iln 1.tic. ...in i, j; ,j ,
Washington
Before Committee
Appearing with Secretary Houston
before the Senate committee were the'
representatives of the farmers' organ-
izations. Mr. Houston answered ques-
tionB about food supplies, high prices
and proposals for minimum and max-
r: ! t I . . it.
Ml II 111 ICC UAlllg i?i&iuiruii. lie
said the Department of Agriculture
acked machinery to obtain an accu-
ate estimate of the country's food
supply now and needs legislation to'
provide it.
Aside from the wheat and potato j
crops there had been no indicated
nonage oi srap.e rooastuirs, tne sec-
j rttti actui. x iic imiviuii ut-cua iui 11a
normal domestic requirements about
640,000,000 bushels of wheat a year.
That amount he said, was about this
year's crop. Last year the nation had
'carry over" of about 170,000,000
bushels of wheat. From July 1 last
until March 1 last the amount export
ed was about 130,000,000 bushels.
With all these facts in mind, the sec
retary said it was hard to determine
the cause for 12.32 wheat.
The secretary said he had no accu
rate estimate of the grain going into
alcohol except that its value last year
was $145,000,000. The Department of
Labor's boy mobilization plan con
templates the establishment of enroll
ing stations in every city in the
country. Boys from 15 to 19 years
old would be organized in squads un-,
ler proper supervision and with ad-
equate equipments would camp on
farms wherever their services were
needed during the season.
"it is planned to enroll boys who
enn he used to dvftntafre wherover '
there may be a .shortage of labor, es'
pecially in agriculture." said a La
bor Department announcement.
IN CONTEMPT CASE
Washington, April 25. The
SU-
preme court decided that the last
house of representatives did not have
the authority to punish United States
District Attorney Marshall for al
I
leged contempt Marshall was ex
empted fro mfurther proceedings.
Now let us put a gold lining in the of Field Axtllery, New Mexico Na
war cloud which hangs over the En- tional Guard, today were .ordered
tentc. Men and money for the cause
1'
freedom! Courier Journal.
TWO .HOSPITAL
VESSELS SUNK
FIFTEEN GERMANS .. WOODED
AMONG THOSE MISSING FROM
BRITISH SHIPS
TORPEDOED BV II U-BOAT
ONE OF BOATS WAS NOT DISTING
UISHED FOR RED CROSS
PURPOSES
London, April 26. The British hos-
pital ships Donegal and Lanfrance,
with many wounded aboard, having
been torpedoed without warning. They
were sunk on April 17. Of those on
j the Donegal twenty-nine wounded
1 n,en and twelve of the c,ew miss-
' in' The Lanfrance carried German
! w"nded as well as British. Of those
aboaid nineteen British and fifteen
uernians are neiievea to have per-
ished.
I '1' k .. A 'l. .. .. 1 I m . V. T71 1
' ,1K - me excuequer,
) AJ. ... T T i
""" aw ""nouncea on
1 Apr" 19 m tne Hollse of Commons
' ll,at the,e ha1 recently been further
' ,os8es of B, itisn hspital ships, which
I iirnnlrl ..,.l,i:nl,AJ m 1 41. .
1 ""u,u "c
! secretary of the Admiralty issued the
fo11owinS statement:
-,w """ unin
n tne evening Of April 17 the
sl"hiis Donegal and Lanfrance,
' whi,e transporting wounded to Brit-
in pons, were torpeaoea witnout
warning. The Donegal carried
slightly wounded cases all British
Of these twenty-nine men, as well, as
twelve of the crew are missing, and
are presumed to have 'been drowned
"The Lanfrance, in addition to 234
wounded British officers and men,
. . ...
.iinraiwM T
I meaicai personnel or iiuy-two
,owing are mifing and are Plumed
i to have been drowned: Two wounded
Eritisn officers eleven wounded Brit-
ol"er ranKS' one noal A,,ny
I Medical Corps staff, five of the crew
f. wnllnrip, 0prman offirprfi anH tpn
.j,i tv, ,,
hllndred and fiftv.lwn woim(1.
cd German prisoners werc re8cued by
. n,.itish natrnl Bt thp immin(,nt
, , . , t,.D,i,i
I . i.ii. ui i i ii k i..v iii. iv. m v.. nn iv.iiiiv vi.
I 0
j rrVip
Lanfrance was a vessel of
6,287 tons gross. She -was 418 feet
in length and was built in 1907. Her
nu-tifprs hofriro tho war wero the
()oth steamship company of Liver-
pool.
Tho Donegal registered 1,997 tons
gross,
She was built at Greenock
,n J904 and wag 331 f t j
The
fast owned the steamer before she
,Qu n h ih r,,.),iC), A,l.
miralty.
BELEIVE OFFICIALS
HAVE UPPER
Washington, April 26. The situa
tion hehin dthe German lines fought
as it is with far more tremendous
possibilities than those presented by
any battle remains dubious and un
certain. lne mue news lnal indies aKrbb
the German frontier indicates that
the authorities have gained the upper
hand ver the strikers by the drastic
method of militarizing the munition
industry and forcing strike leaders
into the fighting ranks,
is too early and information Is
too meager to say whether these
stern measures of repression have
definitely crushed the startling storm
of discontent which has 6wept over
the German empire. The only news
from Austria in some days Is to the
effect that the pan-German leaders
have emerged as victors In the strug
gle for eontrol of the government
This news is vague, however, and
comes by a roundabout route. Relia
ble Information as to conditions in
' ... - j .... u.. - .t..1....l
uie uuui iiiuuiuviiy la bubuuucij itun-
ing.
SEW MEXICO GUARDS
CALLED INTO SERVICE
Washington, April 25. The Fir6t
Regiment of Infantry and Battery A
into the Federal service for purposes
1'
police protection.-
GREAT BRITAIN
THE FIRST
SHE K
nn of iifi
NICHOLS JOINS DENT IN CHAM
PION VOLUNTEER
PLAN
Washington, April 25. With both
houses of congress debating the War
Arnvy Bill today it became more than
ever apparent that there is no fight
ever whether a great army shall be
raised, the only question being what
strength can be mustered by oppo
nents of the Administration's selec
tive draft plan.
In the senate passage of the Gen
eral Staff Bill virtually without
change is regarded as certain; on the
house side the president's supporters
also are confident of cuccess, through
the contest there w ill be bitter. Dis
cussion in the senate may continue
until Saturday, but the house, under
a tentative agreement for eighteen
hours of debate, probably will be
ready to vote by Thursday.
Most of the speeches in the house
were in favor of the Administration
plans, after Representative Dent,
chairman of the Military Committee
had made an opening statement ear-
nestly supporting the bill as amended
by his committee to authorize calls
for volunteers, with provision for ap-
plying the draft only if the volunteer
system fails. Representative Kahn, of
California, ranking republican of the
committee, appeared in the unique
position of spoksman for the president
and leader of the Administration
forces.
BESTED FOR GOVERNOR
Bluff City, Tenn., April 25. J Parks
Worley for Governor of Tennessee.
That was a slogan of a most re
markable ovation given the senator
upon his return from his legislative
duties .here tonight. More than one
thousand people his neighbors and
scores of constituents from all sec
tions of Sullivan county met Urn at
the train, escorted him to his home
and gave him warm welcome.
Mrs. Worley, who accompanied
him, shared in the honors, bowing
and smiling her appreciation to the
assembling throng.
The home coming was an auspicious
occasion. It was one that will be re
membered long in Sullivan county. It
was unique in the political history of
this section. It was an occasion not
often duplicated in the nation.
Welcomed
A handsome bouquet of flowers was
presented to Senator and Mrs. Worley
by John H. Anderson at the close ol
the ceremonies. Following the speech
making an informal reception was
held, during which Senator and Mrs.
Worley shook hands with hundreds ol
the people gathered for the occasion.
The Bluff City band i furnished
music for the occasion.
TURKISH GOVERNMENT
BREAKS WITH AMERICA
Official Notice Reaches ..Washington
Many Americans in
That Counfy
Washington, April 23. Official no
tificatio nof the Turkish government
breaking off diplomatic relation!
with the United States was received
today by the State Department in t
dispatch from American Ministei
Stovall at Berne, Switzerland.
The communication came from G
Cornell Tarler, secretary of the Amer
ican legation at Constantinople, act
ing for Ambassador Elkus, who is 111
It was sent to the American legatior
at Berne and forwarded from there t
Secretary Lansing.
AMERICAN EXPORTS LARGE .
DESPITE SUBMARINES
Washington, April' 26. Despite Ger
many's submarine campaign, Ameri
can exports for March reached
value of more than $551,000,000
which is more than ever before ex
cept 1 astJanuary, of $270,000,000 set
a new record for this country.
TO
RECEIVE
I N
IS HANKER TO THE AMOUNT OF
200,00(VHM. MORE TO
FOLLOW
ASSIST OTHER NATIONS
ITALY WILL PROBABLY GET THE
NEXT LOAN IS IN GREAT
NEED
Washington. April 25 The United
States today stepped into the Great
Britain's former role of banker for
the allies with a fcoo.OOO.ooo loan to
Great Britain herself and the promise
of other speedy financial relief to
Italy, France and Russia.
The British loan was notable as
the first made by the American gov
ernment since its entrance into the
war, and for the clerity with which
it was negotiated, less than 24 hours
after t)M $7,0no,oon,000 finance meas
ure had become a law.
The loans to follow will be placed
where the money is needed the most
Whether Great Britain, Italy,
France, Russia or Belgium is to get
the next loan had not been decided
tonight. All except Belgium have pre-
, sented their applications for relief,
j The next loan will hardly wait for
, the bond issue, but probably will be
! made upon the proceeds of another
subscription to Treasury Certificates
of indebtedness as In the case of the
loan made yesterday. There yet re
mains 150,000,000 of the $250,000,000
subscribed to the first offering of
certificates. Should' there arise need
for quick financing for Italy or any
other Entente government it was said
tonight that, this sum could be made
available without loss of time.
The $200,000,000 furnished today is
said authoritively to be only in the
nature of preliminary financing of
Great Britain to enable her to meet
payments due, or about to fall due
for munitions and other supplies pur
chased in the United States.
The American government will step
beyond the pale of major powers to
lend a helping hand to Belgium, if
Belgium wants the aid. Belgium has
indicated informally that she would
appreciate financial aid.
TAKE WAR BONDS
Birmingham Ala., April 24.JThe
city of Birmingham today made ap
plication for $100,000 worth of the new
iovernment war bonds. Mayor Geo
ge B. Ward wired Governor Harding
jf the Reserve Board, , saying that
Birmingham wishes the honor of be
ng the first municipal in the Union
to respond to the government's ap
peal. GOVERNOR RTE FAVORS
THE SELECTIVE DRAFT
Nashville, Tenn., April 24. Gov. Rye
today declared himself in favor of se
lective draft. "I am for it with all
.ny heart," said the governor. "No man
!s more jealous of Tennessee's title
jf volunteer state than I am, but that
itle was earned at a time when we
had people of the volunteer type.
Times have changed."
WAR REVENUE HILL
GOES TO PRESIDENT
Washington, April 23. The $7,000
KtO.ooo war revenue bill was perfected
in congress today and sent to Presi
dent Wilson for his signature.
SENATOR SMITH WANTS
FREIGHT RATES INVESTIGATED
Washington, ' April 25. Senator
Hoke 'Smith Introduced a resolution
requesting the interstate commerce
commission to suspend and Investiga
gate the fifteen per cent general frei
ght rate Increase asked by the rail
roads. The resolution to have the
senate Interstate commerce commit
tee and not the commission investigate.

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