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The news scimitar. (Memphis, Tenn.) 1907-1926, April 18, 1919, 6 O'CLOCK EDITION, Image 25

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FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1111.
THE NEWS SCIMITAR
PAGE TWENTY-FIVE.
3
A Tale of Two Fists
The Life Story of Jack Dempsey
' ' 'BY DAMON RUNYON. ' . '""I ' '
IT'S VERY QUIET IN LONG BRANCH.
III. I
My friend, Ike Dorgan. and 1 went
down to Long Branch, on the New
Jersey coaet, one chilly March day to
ee Jack Dempeey. It is hern lemp
sey makes hid Kastern headquarters.
I was a little curious to see how
prosperity had affected a former knight
of Lie brakebeanis, who suddenly foi:,id
himself lined with money. 1 had heard
rumors that Lemp?ey, in his new gtory,
was a sort of bright lights' kid. Ii.t
and I went to see what we might ste.
Ike used to manage Frank Moran, thy.
old blond punch absorber from 1'ltts
burgh. and Is at present publicity man
for the Willard-Dempsey fight. Theie
big pugilistic matches are nowadays
conducted as big business, on a portly
scale.
Jack Eearns Appears.
We went by train, and Jack Kearns,
Dampsey s manager, met us at the sta
tion. Kearns has for years been a well
known figure iu sporting circles on the
west coast. He Is an astute handler of
the genus pug. Before be got Demp
ey, he managed dozens of other fight
ers, good, bad and indifferent. He was
supposed to be the manager of Les
l'arcy when the Australian came to this
country, but Ls ran out on him.
Kearns is a slim, dapper, slick loolc'
Ing Individual, with experienced eyes.
His hair Is getting gray around the
edges. He had a nice new Chandler
automobile, painted a delicate blue,
waiting for us.
"Belongs to Dempsey and me," he
explained as we were breezing off in
this nifty rig. "We bought it together.
"We do everything on a 6U-M basis.
We're just like brothers. He's cer
tainly a grand boy,"
"And when he gets to be champion,
and splits out with you, as all fighters
eventually do after they're made, what
then?" I asked.
"Oh " Jack began.
"Uh," I Interrupted, cynically, "this
fellows different from the rest, eh?"
Kearns griniiedV lie has no illusion:!
about his game. He has been around
a long time.
"Well, 1 honestly think he Is different,
at that." he said. "He Heems to be
very fond of Dempsey, and by the same
token Dempsey seems to like Kearns.
We stopped in front of a quiet house
In a quiet, street. o.uiet being the pro
dominating feature of Umg Branch, In
March. It Is a celebrated old-time sum
mer resort, but living there In winter
sirmes one as a prospect about as at
luring as a residence In a baseball yard
during the off season.
The house Is a small two-story frame,
set In a row of similar frames. It is
a small hotel conducted by a fine old
lady whom Kearns greeted as "Mother
Hughes. We were ushered Into a small
panor, which seemed crowded with
men, but the crowd immediately dis
solved into no more than two men. But
they were extra large men.
Look Out for This Boy.
One, of them was Dempsey. I had
met him before, so we wore merely re
suming acquaintance. The other was
a ghost of Bob Fitsslmmons's youth
shoulders, I. gs, hands, freckles and
everything else. He la Martin Burke,
a 20-year-otd amateur, picked up by
Kearns to act as Dempsey's sparring
partner. One of these days you may
hear much of Martin Burke.
There was a biff potbellied stove. In
the room an old-fashioned base burn
er and it was aglow with heat. There
was a table with a reading lamp on It
there were comfortable chairs and
couches. It was an Inviting, homey
looking place, but about the last place
you would pick as a prize fighter's re
treat. It was certainly far from the
lights of old Broadway.
"Dempsey likes It down hore," said
Kearns, and Dempsey nodded acquies
cence, as he pawed through a pile of
phonograph records to let us hear his
latept. Dempsey's musical taste U
pronouncedly Al Jolson.
As a rulo Kearns says "we" In speak
ing of the firm, but the generous as
Blgnment of the liking to Dempsey
alone did not astonish me. Mr. Kearns
is Incandescent reared.
"Oh. I like it here, too," he said has
tily, noting my expression. "It's quiet"
a statement of Indubitable fact which
caused Ike Dorgan, inmate of the Roar
ing Forties (jazz region of Manhattan
island) to clear his throat as if he In
tended speaking. "And restful," con
tinued Kearns.
Beauties of Long Branch.
"Yes, It's a great place," Dempsey
rut in. "1 first got to coming down
here to see Joe Bannon, a friend of
mine who lives here in the summer,
nnd I got stuck on the place. I trained
here for the Fulton match. You see,
I can do my roadwork on the beaches,
and jimmy DeForrest has a good gym
nasium around the corner. Of course
right now I'm not doing any real train
ing. T walk and jog a few miles every
day, but I'm really just laying around
and resting.
"You know," he continued, "I've been
out with burlesque shows lately girl
outfits and I toll you It's pretty nice
to come back here and rest. I certainly
like Long Branch. It's so quiet."
Mr. Dorgan listened to the quiet and
phuddered slightly. There was a great
deal of it Indeed.
"Yon ought to see me act." said
Dempsey. "I'm a better fighter. I'm
going out again with an athletic show,
and then I'm going out to Colorado to
put In shout a month In the moun
tains. I warit to get the old altitude.
Say, I hope they hold the fight some
where out West. That's country, that
Is."
At 6 o'clock "Mother" Hughes an
nounced supper, not dinner supper
and we sat down in tiie timing room at
lunj table with places enough to
accommodate a d;en -people. "Mother"
Hughes has other hoarders besides me
pUKilibtio contingent.
lha food came on Heaped liign in
plate,;, Kearns assisting in carrying
It in, and Dempsey also making sun
dry sorties kiichenw:ud for supplies.
They are evidently thoroughly at home
in "Mother" Hughes house. They are
members of the lamily.
It was home-cooked food, and plenty
of it. Willi homemade bread, and i
could readily understand after watch
ing Dempsey's trencher work why he
likes the place. He Is what you might
cad a "good feeder."
in the evening we tnnk a brief turn
through the quiet streets of Ixmg
Branch to settle our supper; streets
that are teeming with life in the sum
mer evenings.
"There Isn't much doing," Bald Demp
sey, "but 1 can take you to a picture
show if you want."
But we preferred to go hack to that
healthy old base burner, and Ret our
chairs close to its beaming bosom. It
was then that Dempsey begun telling
me his story, which he continued at
other times, and in other places.
Visitors divpped in from time to time.
One fellow came In about a. Belgian po
lice dog which Dempsey had evidently
been bargaining for. The owner had
decided to reduce the price. Jack could
nave It for JiMKI.
"I've already bought two of 'em,
and sent em homo to my folks," said
Dempsey.
The telephone bell rang frequently
and generally the calls were for Demp
sey. "That fellow's going to Fend me a
book," he announced. "It's about a
fighter, and It's called Tashel Byron's
I'rofession.' Is It a good Htory?"
His Little Girl Friend.
"That's a little bit of a girl," he said,
after another call. "She's only seven,
and she's a great friend of mine. I
like kids. I know a lot of era around
the neighborhood."
"But is this all you people do?" de
manded Mr. Dorgan. feebly. "Get up,
and sit down, and then go to bed?"
"Well," said Kearns reflectively, "this
has been rather an exciting evening.
Generally there's not so much doing.
It's real quiet in Long Branch."
Presently It came bedtime, or, any
way, it came to 11 o'clock, and Kearns
took us upstairs to put us away in a
spare room, explaining meantime that
we had kept Dempsey up rather late
and paying no attention to Mr. Dor
gan's manifest horror at the idea of
going to bed before midnight at least.
Dempsey and Kearns apparently oc
cupied most of the nouse. Upstairs
they had a couple of rooms largely
filled with wardrobe trunks. There
must have been half a dozen trunks,
all leaking raiment. For years Kearns
has rivaled the lilies of the field in his
array, and he is evidently conducting
Dempsey along his own sartorial path.
And a few brief years ago a varnished
suitcase with a few extra collars In
it wu,s Dempsey's notion of traveling
abundance.
Kearns also has Dempsey wearing a
wrist watch on a hairy wrist the size
of a leg o' mutton, tir maybe it is
Dempsey who has Kearns wearing the
pulse ticker. Anyway, they both wear
em. Shades of Tom FIkk and old
John L.l
Soon the unearthly quiet of Long
Branch, N. ,T., setled down and encom
passed all In its deadly folds, and
nothing could be heard In the houso
save the partnership snores of Messrs.
Kearns and Dempsey and the shivers of
Ike Dorgan shaking the bed in terror
over the cussed stillness.
'It can't sleep a wink," he was heard
to mumble. "It's too damn quiet."
(Copyright, 1!)19, by Damon Runyon.)
PETE HERMAN WANTS
TO MEET WILDE WITH
AN AMERICAN REFEREE.
Bantamweight Champion Pet
Herman declares that he it anxious
to accept the challenge Issued by
Jimmy Wilde, the flyweight cham
pion of England, but will Insist upon
an American referee. According to
Herman's manager, Sam Goldman,
the bantam champion of the world
has no fear of Wilde, but he does
not agree with the system of Judg
ing points In use In England.
Goldman points out that Ameri
can boxers seldom are able ts win
the decision In English rings when
opposed by English boxers. In bouts
between representatives of the two
countries American boxers have
scored many knockout victories,
but It was seldom that an English
referee could be Induced to decide
In their favor when the contest
went the limit.
The criticism of the decision In
the recent Lynch-White bout has
led Goldman to take the stand that
If the battle Is held In England It
must be Judged by an American ac
cording to the methods employed In
this country.
In the opening exhibition games the
Kert hox rainy outclassed trie utants,
being especially strong on defense, as
Is their habit.
m
LJ iM:'llI. 1 1 iiiu mnri" i "
You can't think of "delicious"
or "refreshing" without think
ing of Coca-Cola.
You can't drink Coca-Cola without
being delighted and refreshed.
The taste is the test of Coca-Cola
quality so clearly distinguishes it
from imitations that you cannot be
deceived.
Demand the genuine by foil nam
nicknames encourage tubettturton.
The Coca-Cola Co.
ATLANTA, GA.
1 ' -"lLi'ii
29
a
mjmmHKBMMIll9i'' 'Ml WL.!1" ,"''' nmimiiLU 1 'I'1 1,1
"
Copyright 1919 Hart Sduftncr & Mar
i
Your Hat
for Easter
Smart style, standard high quality
and 100 per cent Value characterize
the splendid showing of our great
hat store. The very choicest prod
ucts of the world's most noted mak
ers are here for your choosing:
"Stetson," "Borsalino,"
"Mallory," "Perfek-Felt,"
"Young"
And Other Famous Makes
Shown in all the new style, ideas of
shapes, blocks, colors and shades.
$4, $5, $6, $7, $8
Silk Shirts
for Easter
A remarkable exhibit. The must ex
quisite silks in the richest patterns;
crepes, broadcloths, pussy willows
and jacquard effects many with col
lars to match $7.50, $8.50, $10, $12.
"Manhattan" Shirts in unrivaled
showing of fabrics, patterns, color
ings $2.50 to $6.
Easier Neckwear luxurious silks in
the richest color tones and pattern ef
fects; a wonderful displjy 50c to $4.
Silk Hose, Belts, Summer Underwear,
etc.; colossal displays affording value
and quality selection beyond comparison.
The greatest pre-Easter business in our history is a most gratifying
and significant achievement It is conclusive evidence of the bet
ter quality and value satisfaction accorded here selling the world's
finest clothes at no higher cost than inferior goods demand else
where. I
Easter Fashion Review
for Men and Young Men
ELEGANCE, distinctiveness and completeness are
pronounced features of our displays a most sat
isfying exhibit of the favored styles for Spring
showing the widest variety of fabrics, weaves, pat
terns; in authentic models, created for every idea of
taste or requirement for men and young men; tailored
in the superlative degree of perfection which has so
justly won and established world pre-eminence for
Hart Schaffner &
Marx Clothes
It's the high quality of these goods which attracts -the
assurance of pure wool fabrics, correct styliuj:, perfect
tailoring, good fit. The values are matchless for the
price, but we do not feature price, for prices, as every
body knows, mean little, taken by themselves. The tre
mendous business we do, the thousands of thoroughly
satisfied customers we serve, the enviable reputation and
position of leadership enjoyed by this store throughout
Memphis and surrounding towns and cities, all center in
the paramount consideration in clothes-buying quality
and value.
0 I p k No such assemblage anywhere none to com-
btyleS lOr Men parp. Here are displayed the models that
critical dressers admirein fabrics shown here onlypatterns in vast array.
1 very size for every form or figure; no difficulty to fit the "hard to fit.
l lere'are clothes for extra tall or extra, short men for extra, large, extra
small stout, slim or in-between. The spring color tones are rich, and in
keeping with the correct draping of these smart clothes-peerless m qual
ity, style and values
$30, $35, $40, $45, up to $70
, - ,, - -.t' TVr. The clever creations of the Hart
StyleS tOr YOUng Meil Schaffner & Marx Style special
ists for young men; clothes that are different, newer, smarter. Waist-line
models, in many ideas of pockets, lapel and back treatments. Varsity
Fifty-five designs, full of snap and character. In wonderful variety of fab
rics weaves, patterns, colors. Clothes sure to appeal to discriminating,
stylish dressers, and which assure 100 per cent value and satisfaction to
the purchaser.
$30, $35, $40, $45, $50, $60
Your Boy s Clothes
for Easter
Our magnificent Easter displays of Boys' and
Children's Apparel more than ever before
demonstrate Leadership. Quality, Variety,
Value nil prove conclusively the better buy
ing possibilities afforded by this great store
for bovs.
"SAMPECK" tUGH-CXAHS
CLOTHES FOR HOYH
Bent in Amnrlca; a woii
dfirful showing of models,
fabrics and patterns
$11. 50 to UttO.
Olhor good makM
7.no to aio.no.
LITTLE FELLOWB' NOV
ELTY B U I T 8 Middy
Btyleg with long or short
trouaerH ; (tailor, Norfolk
and Tommy Tucker BtylR
In endlBss variety $4.0
to SI 4.30.
CHILDREN'S HIGH
CLASS WASH STUTS
Hand-tailored by the bent
malten; absolutely guar
anteed; In splendid aa
aortments 91-4H to
CHILDREN'S EASTER
HKADWKATl Exrluaive
noveltlna In Milana and
Canton atrawa; aallor.
middy and rah rah atyles
OHo. to $5.03.
' PURITAN " DLOUSK8
AND SHIRTS tn immense
variety 0c to ift.OO.
Burk & Company
24 SOUTH MAIN STREET
OPPOSITE PEABODV HOTEL
Lee Magee Traded
To Brooklyn For
Infielder Kopf
CINCINNATI, O.. April 11. Infielder
Lm Magee wan traded to the Brooklyn
olub for Infieldor Larry Kopf, a-rord-
Injf to an announcement from the of
fices of the rinclnr.att baaelwll ql'ib
here today. Maree dM not take th
aprlnf training trip with the local team,
as the olub refused to meet his de
mandn for a salary Increase.
It was also announced bv the Cin
cinnati club mnnacement today that the
demsnd of Outfielder Ed Rnush for
l(i,Ci(lo salary would not t met "W
have offered Itoush a contract calling , FERGUSON STARTED EARLY
fielder In the National league Is get
ting," aald President Herrmann, "but
wa will not nay him $10,000."
MRS., WAGNER LEADS.
At the regular weekly play at the
Colonial Country club for the Halle tro
phy Thursday Mrs. H. J. Wagner led
the field with low net. Mrs. E. L.
Fowler led with low gross.
Now they are trying to get the two
Mikes. Gibbons and O'Dowd, mlied up
In a 14-foot ring to determine the mid
dleweight championship. O'Dowd would
have a good deal of trouble getting close
to the US -pound mark.
Alex Ferguson, the Bloomfteld. N.
boy, who Is at the Yankee' ramp In
Jacksonville, trying out for n place on
the pitching stnff, xlgned his flrnt New
York contract in February. l!Ufi. and
trained that yenr wlih the club at
Macon. He wan a frail youngster then,
whose phyriluua made It certain that he
would not Ktlolt long In the major.. He
was let out for reanonlng, and now he
romes back a well-hullt aihlete. who
has filled out to the extent of 15 or 20
pounds since his flrit tryout.
The Braves and Tigers In their burn
storming exhibition Km through
Georgia seldom made a total of fewer
than :i runs. The contests were marked
by wild slugging.
O'DOUL FAVORS SPOKE.
Frank O'Poul, Ihe southpaw pitcher
drafted by the Yankees from the Han
Francisco club, may never approach
(he heights a.i a ball player which Trli
Kpssker hsa reached, but he closely re
nemblen tho Cleveland star In miiny
ways. He has il the mannerlfm of
the lianl-hittlng Texan In the outfield
d i ill i nind toe hiie . He wtilli
like Trls snd has certsln resemblances
In profile snd physique, appearing nmoh
as Speaker must hae sppesred In his
more slender days.
Chick Evans, who now holds both the
open and the amsieur fiolf titles of the
l'nlt4 States, probably will not defend
the former crown in the open tourna
ment at Brae Burn early in June. Chick
sny his business is taking up most of
his time these dins.
The Olympic games of IC20 nrs to b
held at Antwerp, Iridium. Thst ought
to be a source of vast, consolation to
that stricken county. Germany will not
be allowed to participate. . ; , .
Electric Work
Bv
FOWLER
Next to Cat Co.
Bead New Scimitar Wtnti.
try-

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