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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, March 09, 1896, Image 1

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THE OMAHA- DAILY BEE.
ESTABLISHED JUNE 19 , OKAHA , MONDAY , KATICI ! 9 , 1896. SINGLE COPY FIVE CENTS.
OFFERS A LIMITED AMNESTY
General Woylor Makes His Proposition to
the Cuban Insurgents.
FIFTEEN DAYS TO GET UNDER COVER
Wlio Surrender Tlieninolvc *
tvltli ArniH Will Ho tfn-c nnil
ThriHU Without Ariiix AVI 11
lie Watched. *
( t'opyrlsht , HOD. by PrtM Publhhtnff Company. )
HAVANA , Cuba , March 8. ( New York
World Cablegram Special Telegram. ) The
expected proclamation by General Weylcr ,
denounced In advance In the United States ,
has been Issued. It waa looked for as soon
OK the twfo wcntcrn provlnccn should be com
paratively free from rebels. The order la
not as severe as was predicted. General Woy-
ler annpiinccsi that rebels who "present them
selves , " that is to say , who surrender , In
the provinces of Matanzas , Santa Clara , I'u-
crto Prlnclpo and San Ulcgo will bo given *
liberty It they bring their arms. These who
como In "without arms" will bo sent to some
town , where they will bo under surveillance.
Havana and Plnar del Rio provinces are not
included In this offer of amnesty , which IB not
as sweeping as that proclaimed by General
Campoo.
A general proelarnatlon issued for Pluar del
Rio and Havana provinces announces that all
largo bands of rebels have been driven from
these provinces toward the eastern part of
the Island , leaving only Email scattered
groups. The Spanish troops which will oper
ate against them will bo divided Into small
columns to work In conjunction with de
tachments of civil guards. All the civil
guards In Puerto Prlnclpo and San Dlcgo will
bo brought to Havana province. This sig
nifies that the government means to Intrust
the maintenance of order In Havana and
Plnar del Rio to the civil guards , which cor
responds to the French gen d'armes. The
regular troops will bo withdrawn from the
two western provinces and sent cast.
The authorities of any town may arm
volunteers for local service by asking per-
inlrelon. The mayors of all towns arc
directed to report within ten days the names
ot all residents ot their Jurisdiction \\ho
have joined the rebels. All such who do
not present themselves In fifteen days will
be considered rebels , and their property will
bo confiscated. Any rebel who presents him
self In fifteen days will be under surveil
lance , but non.o will bo molested except these
who held public office prior to "going out , "
that is , joining the Insurgents , or had been
guilty of crime. This last provision Is to
avoid pardoning certain persons who were
well known robbers before the rebellion , and
are now with the Insurgent forces. All who
surrender after the fifteen days will bo
kept under guard. All persons who glvo elder
or Information to the rebels will bo held tb
bo assisting the rebellion. Residents ot
localities In which railways or telegraphs
have been destroyed are required to help re
pair them.
PUSHING THE REBELS HARD.
The rebels are now belnc pushed harder
than ever before. The Spanish troops ore
Incessantly In motion with nil the , tireless
energy that characterizes the Spanish in
fantry. No large rebel band Is within ninety
miles of Havana. Gomez Is about thirty
miles further away than ho was yesterday.
The engagement at Corral Fnlso proves
to have been something more than -tho cus
tomary skirmish with a rebel rear guard
that goes for a real battlci here. Maceo ,
Lacreto nnd Gomez having Joined forces ,
thus forming nn aggregate force of nearly
8,000 men , were overtaken by a Spanish
column under Colonel Vicuna , on the Diana
sugar plantation near Corral False In. the
center ot Matanzas province. Gomez did
not rnalto a prolonged stand , but broke Ills
people up Into bands , aiid , according to re
port , moved northeast In tlio direction of
San Miguel , whllo Maceo retreated toward
Manjuarl. The rebel losses are stated thus :
"Soventy-ono killed , 200 horses captured ;
many wounded and carried away by un
armed camp followers. "
The report Is Incorrect as to Gomez. Gen
eral Pando , commanding In Santa Clara , re
ports that Gomez la at Voladores , in that
province , Just cart of the Matanzas line.
A small band of rebels fired on a train on
the Western railway going to Artemlsa , near
the Plnar del Rio border.
I witnessed yesterday an Instance of Gen
eral Wylor's energy. After visiting the bar
racks , ho returned to the palace and ran up
a long flight of marble stairs In full uniform ,
taking two and three Ptcpo at a tlmo , to
the third story. His staff , headed by Lieu
tenant General Ochando , walked up.
The steamship Ohio , with excursionists
from Philadelphia , arrived from Jamaica to
day , and sails tonight for Fernandlna.
WILLIAM SHAW BOWEN.
ni3FI2ATl3D WITH SUVEIIK LOSSES.
KliinilNli Have nil 12nK Koi rnt with
tlic ArmloH of ( IIIIIIPB nml Macro.
HAVANA , March 8. An Important engage
ment Is officially reported to have taken place
In the central portion of Matanzas province.
Colonel Vicuna reports he met a force of In
surgents numbering 7,000 and led by Maximo
Gomez and Antonio Macoo , La Gret and
otliera at the plantation of Diana and Atabrus ,
In the district of Corral Falsa. They were
dislodged from their position by tlio troops
nnd made a precipitate flight toward San
Miguel do Las Banos. The Insurgent loss
la reported to bo suvcnty-ono killed and forty-
two wounded left on the Held , as well as
numerous others curried off , The Insurgents
else lost 200 hornet ) . The loss of the troops
wns three killed and nineteen wounded. ,
General Panda also sends in a report that
Maximo Gomez patscd by Votadrcs , In the
Clenfuegos district. *
The columns of Lieutenant Colonel Lols-
undl fought the Insurgents at Serpentls ,
Banctl Hplrltiis.
A ccuitt Inspector baa been killed by the
Insurgents.
Volunteer troops at the plantation of
Ovlda fought the Insurgent leader Bandora-
inoa , two privates being wounded and two '
taken prisoners.
The Insurgents attacked , plundered and de-
vtroyetl a papbongcr train from Cardenas.
The train wan carrying ammunition to a fort
under construction at Artemla. The firing
wag done by a band supposed to be that of
Perlco del Gado. The train's escort was
taken prisoners.
Qonralo del CrUto , mayor ot Managua ,
who joined the Insurgents , has been taken
prisoner In a house In Havana , General
Weyler has pardoned him and alca his
brother , who arrived hero from Mexico.
In on engagement In the province ot Ha-
, vatia Ilonjamln Argnmontc , nn Insurgent
officer In Uio confidence ot Gomez , was
killed.
Valuable I'n-Hi-iit to Him.
CITY OF MEXICO , March 8. A local
eclentUt lia produced an excellent photo
graph by the Roentgen process.
Lending bankers , manufacturers and mer
chants of the foreign colonies here will give
a complimentary dinner to President Diaz MIre
the 2d of April , and prenvnt him with MIa
masjlvo gold plalo with a commemorative
intcrlptlon , worth $ SO,000.
Mexican diver 3 per cent boudv have
reached a quotation In Europe approximating ;
these of Mexican gold C * . Silver band : com
mand 47. wlille gold bonds at double the rate
of Interest arc at 01 ,
X MV fiovrriior for C'rrtc.
CONSTANTINOPLE , March S. Tarkhan
Pasha , former minister of foreign affairs , lias
been appointed governor of Hie Uland ot
, Crete.Two
Two KartliijiinUfii In On Wt-t-k.
BERLIN , March S. Todtmoox. in the
Black Forest , has twlco been vlsltei ) by an
earthquake during the week.
K IinjlEMIinilS US WKI.L.
IT Indulge * In Sonic Ornccfnl
ITC Comnicntn on American * .
( Copyright , 18W , by Pren Publishing Company. )
MADRID , Spain , March 8. ( Now York
World Cablegram Special Telegram- ) The
World correspondent was most graciously re
ceived by Infanta JJMncess ) Eulalle , when ho
went to deliver the World's cable request
that , she glvo to the American people her
vlows upon the present International crisis ,
The infanta , had been advised oC his mlsj'.on '
by t J Scnor C.inovas , the prime minister , who
kindly obtained the queen regent's willing
azncnt to It , which assent Is Indispensable
for any communication with a prlncesa of
the blood royal. The Spanish prefhlcr In
formed the correspondent before the visit
that the Infanta was , to quote her own
words , "delighted to have an opportunity
to show that I cherish pleanant recollections
of my visit to the United States. " At the
appointed hour the correspondent was re
ceived by her royal highness In a beautiful
gallery , filled -with rare plants and antique
furniture. Her answer to his request was
In English , and In her own handwriting , and
In giving It to the correspondent , she re
marked : "Younecd. . not apologize for
troubling mo , as I am glad to find this oppor
tunity to show how much I appreciate Amer
ica. "
The Infanta spoke In the most enthusiastic
terms of the people of the United States , nnd
of the World's fair. As the correspondent
was leaving , her royal Iilghncs3 said :
"Look yonder on yonder wall , " pointing to
ono of the numerous holographs hanging
there , "that ono Is of AJvs. Cleveland , who Is
so lovely and so kind. "
"Do you like the American women ? " the
correppondent ventured to ask.
The Infanta replied Instantly : "Oh , yes ,
they nro so bright , BO Intellectual , sx > refined ,
and were so hospitable and kind to me. "
The Infanta's message to the people of the
United States Is :
"Sweat remembrances of the affectionate
reception given to me by the people of the
United States when I went to their country
representing my own at the festivities In
honor of Columbus , live and over will live
in my heart. During those festivities strong
proofs of mutual esteem were given by both
countries. I became convinced , and still be
lieve , that never , never should that tradi
tional friendship bo broken , much less should
peace bo broken. Being apart from affairs
of state , I can only pray God fervently that
cordial relations tietween the two countries
may never cease. EULALIE. "
PUOPLH AT VALENCIA TURIIUL1SNT.
The Police nnil CJeti iVArmpH Iliive
Trouble IIIxiiei-Hlnf ? Them.
MADRID , March 8. The United States
minister , Mr. Taylor , has refused to ac
cept the resignation of Spaniards acting ns
United States consuls , when they were writ
ten lu Spanish , on the ground that that lan
guage Is not the official language of the
United States. '
VALENCIA , March 8. This city was
again In a turbulent state today over the
condition ot the relations between Spain
and the United States. A mob gathered nnd
was proceeding toward the American con
sulate with the Intention of causing a dis
turbance there , but a force of police and
gen d'armes opposed their passage thro'igh
the streets. A desperate struggle ensued
and several persons were wounded. Includ
ing a ccn d'arme. The mob succeeded In
entering the Plaza de Toros by destroying
the gates leading from the bull ring. They
then held a meeting In the arena. A state
of siege was proclaimed.
Several foreign military officers. Including
some Englishmen , have offered their serv
ices to the Spanish minister of war , Scnor
Marco de Azcarraga In the event of war be
tween Spain and America. The official be
lief however , Is expressed that no conflict
will occur. Patriotic demonstrations have
occurred throughout the country since the
action of the United States congress on the
Cuban .question and many wealthy Spaniards
are offering money to the government. Sev
eral towns have also sent messages offerIng -
Ing gooda and their lives in defense of the
country. The ship owners of Seville have
offered to place fifty steamers nt the disposal
of the government. In the Basque province ,
a subscription has been opened to present a
warship to the government.
The disorders have ceased In this city and
the streets of Madrid have been tranquil
sluco the unlverplty was closed. The gen
d'armes dispersed n crowd which was cheerIng -
Ing In front of the French consulate In Bar
celona as an expression of a hope for i
Franco-Spanish alliance.
LONDON , March 8. The Madrid corre
spondent of the Standard , noting that the
utmost energy of the authorities falls to
prevent demonstrations of hostility toward
the United States , says the press everywhere
deprecates premature ebullitions , but plainly
expresses the opinion that these Impulses
may soon be needed for energetic action , as
Spain will sooner confront any contlgoncy ,
however dangerous , than stoop to Insult.
"Senors Sagasta. Mara , Castellan , Canov.is ,
and other leading statesmen whom I have
consulted , " the correspondent proceeds to
say. "all agree that they are entering upon
a decisive stage In their relations with
America that with relation to the rebels
will have most serious consequences.
The Infanta 'Eulalle has sent a friendly
message to the New York World.
"Ten thousand persons engaged at Val
encia In a demonstration organUed by well
knoun republicans. They made a noisy dis
play before the French consulate and public
buildings before going to the American con
sulate , when 'tho civil guardo opposed It
self. Shots were heard and the guards re
sponded with their carbines and charged re
peatedly before they dispersed the mob.
These arrested were found to bo chiefly re
publicans. The affair has caused great
alarm.
"The police dispersed an Imposing gather
ing at Saragossa. "
M.VCIJO HKXT A HI'ISOIAL MHSSKNGKH.
llcportH tliu I nun rise 11 tM lilt
Ground Dully ,
TAMPA , Fla. , March 8. Among the pas
sengers arriving from Cuba tonight was an
Insurgent emissary with an Important dis
patch from Antonio Maceo to the Junta In
New York. This gentleman Is highly edu
cated and gives eomo Interesting facts about
the progress of the revolution and of plans
which General Gomez Intends putting Into
effect. Maceo , ho represents , la now at
Cano , five mllca from Havana , with 8,000
men. At Cano the guards had a rklrmlsh
Friday morning. The people of Havana are
nlarmed , but General Weylcr , the agent
says , docs nothing to disperse the encamped
enemy , who are occupying strong position *
over the Island awaiting General Weylcr'B
premised attack. Among other llilngi ! men
tioned In Macoo's report Is that from
January 1 to February 20 he cap
tured from the Spaniards 2,800
Mauser and Remington rides , besides other
miscellaneous arm * ; also 210,000 rounds of
ammunition by Intercepting convoy trains
and the capture of small forts. Several field
pieces were also taken. Maceo has now 6,000
well armed men and 2,000 nilrcellaneouBly
equipped. III.i losers at I'aro Heal , Can-
dclarla anil Alqulzar were 200 men und forty
olllcers. These aru all the losses he men
tioned , 3)0
Slnco "Weyler's proclamation fully 8,000 )
men have joined the Inturgcnt forces In the
province of Puerto Principe. General Maceo ,
the agent says , has returned there to raise
an army of 25.000 , In ordei that he may by
April , In conjunction with Gomez's forces
and others , conwIId'Ue an army of 40,009 men
i.ear Havana r.nd bo prepared for an aggres
sive campaign.
The InfurKCiilH say that If the Unlttd States
recognizes them they will win within u year ;
If cot they will ultimately win , but the cnJ
will bt delayed.
Patrlnrc-li llL-iiU'M < < * il lo
LONDON , March 8.-A dispatch to the
Chronicle from Constantinople wys the sul >
tan Is drtiTmlncd to get rid of the Armenian
patriarch Mattea Ismlrl'un and has Invited :
li in to resign , Muting thut If he refuses to
do iC a wirso fate will befall the Armenians.
FIGHTING BY PROCLAMATION
General Woylor Puts in the Day Issuing
Manifestoes ,
OFFERS PARDON TO DIVINITY TEACHERS
DcrlHCN n. Plan , for KcornniilnliiK the
Dlnturlicil Province * Aliment >
1'romlncil to Those Who
. . Surrender.
( Copyright , 18KS ! , by the Associated Press. )
HAVANA , March 8. Captain General
Weylcr has Issued the following circulars :
I have promulgated an order that the
teachers or divinity of the provinces of Ma
tanzas , Santa Clara , Puerto Prlnclpo and
Santiago do Cuba , who confessedly have
taken part In the movements of the rebels ,
shall 1 be pardoned on making their submis
sion , surrendering their arms and placing
themselves under the Burvelltnnco of the
lawful authority , provided they have not
committed other crimes since the Issuance
of my last proclamation. It wli : be a cotn-
incmlnblo circumstance Hint these submis
sions may bo inatlo by bodies of those af
fected.
The teachers who , without arms , shall
come ( tn under the same circumstances , will
bn immediately transferred to the encamp
ments , towns and fort ? , and In general
where they may bo under the Immediate
of the troops , and all the
teachers shall be under the control of the
commandants In whatever jurisdiction they
may be assigned. A record of those so at
tached to each column , encampment or foi twill
tiw
will be kept , nnd their superiors will make
a report every fifteen days concerning the
conduct of the teachers , and will determine
the t ! time at which they will be permitted to
reside In whatever place It may bo deemed
advisable lo conduct them , plnclng _ them
under the supervision of the local authori
ties , or making any other disposition of
them which may bo considered proper. In
the t : meantime they will become permanently
attached to the military forces , and will
glvo their attention to the dying , nnd will
be entitled to such rations as troops In the
Held or traveling.
These directions will not go Into effect
In the provinces or Plnar del Rio and Ha
vana until these provinces have extended to
them the prevailing law In the case of those
who deliver themselves up to the author-
Ules. WEYLER.
Havana , March 5 , 1836.
The following proclamation has also been
Issued :
Proclamation of Don Valcrlano Weylcr Y.
Nlcolau , Marquis de Tencrlffe. Govemor
General , Captain General of the Island of
Cuba and Genernl-ln-Chlef of the Army ,
etc. : I make known to our hara jdd troops
nnd to those who attempt to demoralize
them as they pursue eastward rebel par-
tics , more numerous than thoea whom
they leave In the pravlncas ) of Plnar del
Hlo nnd Havana , that t.ie tlmo has arrived
to pursue with the created activity mid
rigor the little bands , more o * outlaw. * ihan
Insurgents , who remained In the s.ild pru\-
inces , and to adopt whatever measures arc
necesbary for the proper and Immediate
carrying out of that Intention ; I hereby
order :
1. That the troops be divided Into col
umns to operate In both province * and that
the gunrdls civil be re-established' on I he
lines ot that now existing In Plnar do" UIo
and In a. part of Puerto Pwnclp" , and tnut
In Havana and a part of theprovlncj of
Santiago de Cuba and occupy only II-e
places remote from the pie-icnt pacliUd ir
tranqulllzcd districts until they are able to
occupy the positions which they held before
( In the districts now In icvolt. )
2. The commander ot eacn zon-s ov the
corresponding olltclul , who may be Ml.er-
wlse characterized In v > : h place , shall be
the commander of the nulve army anJ
Fhall have municipal DOWOI-S , but In a less
degree than those he exsmises In the rame
position with , any garrison forca of the
army. In this case the com-niind of : he ra-
tlvo armies will devolve In accordance with
seniority of service.
3. Each community seeking to do so , and
applying to the general staff of the army ,
may arm a section of volunteers cr guer
illas of thirty men equipped is Infantry
soldiers , which force will defend tin- win
try anil operate under orders of the nrl.l-
tary authorities of the locality. Each fccc-
tlon may be commanded by retired clKteis
or deputed ofllclals , or bv iio.-sons of fitls-
factory quallilcatlons ana nntsa .lns , ob
taining the pay of these holding M conil
command of Infantry , tliu appointment of
the ofllclals of these sections to l-o approved
by the captain general.
4. Those who are in pD-.ss-lon pf aims
must be placed In a stale of compute de
fense and enabled lo avoid surprise
5. The military governors of Havana and
Pinar del Rio will present reports lo the
captain general for the guidance of the
commander-ln-cblcf of the third army corps ,
and wl'.l send to the governor Keneral pro
posals for the nominations of mayors or
magistrates In the places where guarols
clvfi exist , or If they deem It expedtont 10
recall those olllcluls , retired peipuns r
authorized persons who possess tlio i > et'ts-
snry qualifications.
C. The authorities of the villages who
will show themselves friendly within a
term of ten days , and these or the vicinity
of the same , and all those within Its limits
that- are engaged In the Insurrection , are
warned to furreiider themselves within the
space of fifteen days from the publication
of this proclamation , otherwise they will
be subject to arrest ; and well disposed per-
HOns will be held to their civil responsibili
ties , and , to effect this , It will be proposed
to the governor general tt , nominate u body
which will ECO to cariylng this out.
7. If , In the case of Insurgent parties who
have robbed , sucked , burned or committed
other outrages during the icbelllon , any
one will glvo Information n to the partici
pation that such persons may have had In
them , not only1 these who may have been
tn the rebel ranks , but also those who have
succored them or who have not remained
In their homes , they will bo fittingly pun-
Ithed ; and , moreover , If any town or oilier
place where robberies have been effected
Is known to them , they will be required to
make Identification , that proper responsi
bility may b6 llxcd.
8. Rebels who may not no responsible for
any other crime , who , within the term of
fifteen days , present thcmBeUes to the near
est military authority In Doth province ? ,
and who will assist In the apprehension of
any ono guilty of the foiogolng offenses
will not bo molested , but will be placed nt
my disposal. Those who have presented
themsc'vos nt an earlier time will be par
doned ; thoie who may have committed any
other crimes , or who obstructed any pub-
llo cargo proceeding to Its destination will
be Judged according- , their antecedents
nnd their case will bo withheld for llnal
doteiinitiation. Ho who presents himself
and surrenders arms , ana In a Ki eater de
gree If there Is a co'.Icctlva picscntatlon ,
will have his case determined by me. All
who present themselves after the time men
tioned In this warning will bo placed nt my
9. All the authorities or civil function
aries of whatsoever kind v.'lio do not hold
a licence for attendance upon the plok and
who are not found nt their posts after tha
end of eight days In bath provinces will
bo named to the govcrnoi- general an ceas
ing to act for the local authorities.
10. The planters , manufacturers and other
persons , who , within the territory of the
provinces warned , shall periodically fuclll-
tate or even for n Hlnslo time shall glvo
money to the InsurgentR , ave ami In the
en BO of their being forced to yield to su
perior force , a circumstance which will have
to be examined In a most searching manner ,
will bo regarded ua disloyal through help
ing the rebellion.
11. Kor the repair of roads , railways , tee.
giaphs. etc. , the personal co-operation of
the Inhabitants of the villages will bo re
quired and In the caeo of tlio destruction
of any kind of property the occupants pf
convenient habitations will bo held respon
sible If they do not Immediately Inform
tlio nearest authority of sucli occurrence ,
VALKUIANO WEYLHH.
Memorial Tnlilft to Kriinlcllu.
PAHIS , March 8. The Hltorcal : society
i at I'assy , on Sunday , placed a tablet on
the house which Uenjamln FrankJIn occu-
pled there In 1770. Two members of thu
society tpoke on the subject of Franklin's
stay In France. &I. Faye , the distinguished
a < troncmr and member of the French In
stitute , made an address referring to Frank-
tin's career as a scientist.
IltiMNlaiiH lireI2liit < * il.
LONDON , March 9. A St. Petersburg dis
patch to the Times describes the Russian
illation over the defeat of the Italians. The
Novoa Vremya has opened subscriptions to
a fund to tend Red Cross assistance to the
Abysslnlans. The correspondent suggests
that this must be with government approval ,
as public subscriptions require an olllclal
lanctlon.
DIFFICULTY FORMING A 'OAIIIMJT.
Henori tlmt Mnranli' U .Hiullnl Him
AccotupllMliciI the frank.
ROME , March 8. There U touch difficulty
being founij In thp task of forming1 a new
ministry. Slgnof Sarroco1 hasj declined the
responsibility , whllo the nttcnipt to form a
Snrroco and Rudlnl combination bag also
failed. U Is announced tonight , howovcr ,
that the Marquis dl Iludlnl has succeeded In
forming a cabinet with himself as premier
and minister of interior ; General Rlccotl ,
minister of war ; Signer Brln , minister ot
foreign affairs ; Senor PcfJzzI , minister ot the
trcnmiry , and Admiral Racchla , minister ot
marine.
H developed later that the formation of
the cabinet had been undertaken by General
Rlcottl. King Humbert conferred with Gen
eral Rlcottl nt 7 o'clock this evening nnd
charged him with the formation of a cabinet.
The result was the formation of a cabinet
as already cabled , tlio general yielding to the
Marquis dl Rudlnl the premiership nnd him
self assuming the portfolio of war n Indi
cated above. Further member * of the cabi
net decided upon arc Signer tiulccardlnl , min
ister of finance , and Slgnor Granturlo , minis
ter ot Justice.
General Baldissera has been authorized to
withdraw the Cabala garrison should their
position bccomo endangered. The reports
that Cassnln Is surrounded by Dervishes has
not been confirmed.
MASSOWAII , March S. The commandant
at Adlgrat tolegrapho , under date of March
2 , that the rebsls were thcfi within a few
kilometers. "We have plenty of ammunition
and provisions for n month , " the commandant
continues , "which wo hope' to extend by
going on rfiort rations. Wo will do our duty
till death. " I
LONDON , March 8. The Dally News
correspondent nt Rome "wires : The
choice of General Rlcdttl as min
ister of war Bhowa that the king's Ideas
have prevailed In favor ot reopening an
offensive campaign In the nuftimh , after the
rainy season. General Baldlssera lias ordered
Ihe Cassala garrison to .withdraw1 ,
TIMES SATISFIED WITH THE CASK.
Dine Hook linn Si-ttlcit It ( or All Fair
Mlmloil Men ; .
LONDON , March 9. Tho-correspondent of
the Times at New York , discussing the
Venezuelan boundary dispute , declares there
Is | no reason to suppose that direct negotia
tions between England and Venezuela on the
boundary question will have a good result.
"Tho controversy , " the correspondent con
tinues , "passed beyond that stage when th
Washington government adopled th < ' . .i
which I cabled three weeks ago Tin-re has
boon no official contradlo" i. , of that plan.
There could be none , because It was this
government's plan. " j
The , dispatch proceeds torcjcrd the deep
Impression which the manifesto of Senor
Cnnovas del Castillo , the BpaDish premier ,
has made upon the American public. The
result will probably be , the fl/spateh / sajs ,
that the matter of the recognition of the
belligerency of the Cubans ; will be left to
the president to decide. < - , j
The Times discusses editorially the British
side in the boundary dispute Ithls morning ,
saying : "The blue book must convince nil
approaching the subject with an open mind
that Mr. Bayard's description rwhllo he was
secretary of state ) ot our'-.dlfferenco ' with
Venezuela In his dispatch to' Mr. Phelps ,
United States minister to1 England , on De
cember 30 , 1SSC , was andIs ajtrue descrip
tion , namely : 'That ho had , no Idea that
political or territorial cxp'aaslpli of authority
on the American continent Auld influence
the government In reference0Venezuela. , '
The article , admitting that , . 0pVenoBuelan
side of the case has not vof'CJjepn heard ,
deals at great length with tlioUrguments
already adduced by.jtho Venezuelan govern
ment and arrives at the conclusion that un
less the latter has more solid facts and
arguments to bring forward , It will find It
hard to damage ! the British case In the eyes
ot the unprejudiced. "
CONSULTING WITH HIS MIMSTEHS.
Speculation Coiieernlii/r tlic Meaning-
of the Kiuneror' VlnltH.
BERLIN , March 8. The long visits of
Emperor William to Canceller von Hohenlohe ,
Baron von Blebcrsteln , the minister of for
eign affairs , and the Austrian ambassador on
Saturday have given an Impulse to specula
tion in the press and In political circles on
the eubjcct of the visit tills week to Berlin
of Count Goluchowskl , the Austrian minis
ter" for foreign affairs , and the future rela
tion of Italy to the Drelbund , which are
undoubtedly the subject of Count Goluchow-
skl's mission. The papers generally counsel
Italy to make the utmost sacrifice to fcavc
her honor and they hint thai Germany and
Austria will support thli } policy , The Boor-
eon Courier , on the contrary , contends thai
Italy's position would not bo weakened 11
she withdrew from the African adventure.
The Vorwaorts leads the democratic sections
of the press with a ferocious attack upoi :
Italy and Slgnor Criepl , dubbing the latter
the hero of the Banco Romano scandals ant
the slcuthhound of Italy , who lacks the
courage to face Parliament. , These papers
naturally welcome the collapse ot the Drel-
bund , but In the face ot Italy's difficulties at
homo and abroad and the doubtful attitude
of Ruraia toward Italy , It lo not easy to pre
dict the outcome of Count Goliichowslil'o con
fcrenco hero. There are even rumors here
that King Humbert , In ordon to qsapo fron
the dilemma , will abdicate In favor of hlo
son. The fear of England's attitude since
the Transvaal affair Is also a factor In the
situation.
< * k Jtcndj- for I'rni'Ci
LONDON , March 8. A dispatch to the
Morning Post from Paris reports the tcxi
of a letter from Menelok , the negus of
Abyssinia , to M , De Loncc. editor of Le
SIccle , written prior to the battle of Adowa
offering to accept the arbitration of Leopold
king of the Belgians , The correspondon !
believes this offer still holds , but Klni ,
Leopold declines to act unices ho la askev
by Italy , which Is impossible.
UULKCATKS AMtlSADY DKG'IDKD OX
Ohio Itcpiilillciin Convention to Meei
nt Colninliuu Tiit-vilny.
CINCINNATI , March 8. TJ J01ilo rcpub
llcan convention meets a ( < dutuuibus Tuea
day afternoon for temporary * organization
when Senator-elect J. B. Poraker , as tern
porary chairman , will dellvcr he koynoti
speech. Ho says his speccbi vlll bo thi
Ohio nomination of McKInlpy , Jor president
and that he will not dlscups.jUaues. It Is
expected that the temporary iorganlzatlop
will be made permanent on Wednesday , when
delegates and alternates af. bugo will be
selected for the St. Louis cdnreutlon and a
state ticket nominated , It IB Conceded tha
Senator-elect Foraker. Governor Bushnell
General Grosvenor and 'Mark , Hupna will bi
tbo four delegates at largo anij'lliat the cc
caBlon will ha a McKlnley qelefiratlon , Th
programs of the convention , have a larg
McKlnley frontispiece , and git , ' the arrange
meiits point to an elaboratq , queuing of ( hi
McKlnlty campaign , Tlio nominations an
for secretary of state , supreme judge am
the usual alternate year etato ofllccs.
\oiie of tinI'nHKoinriTii Hurt. .
LOS ANGELES , Cat. , March 8.-The
southbound Sunset , ' limited ) the Southern
Pacific's continental llyer , w g wreqked : ast
night near Puenta. The ! traniU ! running
at a high speed on the datvn grade when
It ulruck u liorae. The eny'nj ' wa derailed
and flvo of the six cars followed , full. Th i
dining car. which was In iho'rcar , wan Iho i
only one'that gtu'd upon tli&r < illo < Strange
to say , no one was hurt , 'fhe passengers
were Iransfeireil to K local ( rain and ar
rived In this city ' -three und u ha'f honrn
late. *
Miner * llniiiiud nn Ailvai ce.
PHILLISPSHl'RG , Center county , Pa. ,
March 8. At the miller's mass meeting to
day rei-olulloiiH were udoptet ) declaring In
favor of asking fjr advance of 10 cents a
ton on and after April 1. 8ipj were taken
to bring about a union of u'l miners In cen
tral Pennsylvania to the end that the Ue-
inlht ; bo we le Ktneral. ;
TAKING UP THE CONTESTS
louse Has Two on the Onlondar Ready for
Action ,
SENATE HAS THE DUPONT CASE ON HAND
Two Appropriation 11111 * on tlic llonnc
1'roftrnni Senate AVIII Fliinlly
Nc of tlic Cuban .
llCMolHtlOIlN ,
WASHINGTON , March 8. The house this
week will continue work on the appropriation
bills nnd dispose of ono , possibly two , of the
pending contested election cases. The post-
office appropriation bill will , It Is thought , bo
passed tomorrow. The naval appropriation
bill Is the next supply bill In order. During
the week the Aldrlch-Robblns case from the
Fourth Alabama district , tbo report of which
la against the democratic sitting member ,
will bo called up. and If tlmo Is offered the
report of the committee In the Benolt-Boot-
ncr case from the Fifth Louisiana , declaring
. .
the scat occupied by Mr. Boatncr vacant , will
also bo acted upon.
The Cuban question will bo revived In the
senate Monday on tbo proposition to accept
Iho report of the conference committee , agree
ing to tlin house resolutions. There Is a pos
sibility of considerable debate on the sub
ject ; but , on the other hand , the report maybe
bo accepted after but brief exchanges of
views. It Is believed that under no circum
stances the question will be prolonged beyond
Monday , and there Is little doubt that the
house resolutions will be agreed to.
The Dupont election case from Delaware
will also continue to receive attention during
the week. Senator Turplo will speak on1 Mon
day In opposition to the seating of Mr. Dupont
and will bo followed when opportunity af
fords by cither Senator Prltchard or Senator
Chandler for Dupont. It Is not believed the
debate on this question will bo concluded
during the present week.
The bill to prevent the extermination of the
Alaskan seals has been the special order
for Thursday , but whether It will be taken
up at that time will probable depend upon
whether nn amicable arrangement can bo
made concerning the Dupont case. Thcro Is
[
no disposition on the part ot the seal bill to
revent continued consideration of the Du-
ont matter. The seal bill will provoke dis
union when reached. It Is understood to be
onator Morgan's purpose to discuss It nt
cngth.
Senator Butler has given notice of a speech
n Monday on his bill to prevent the further
yue of government bonds.
If the committee on public lands gets In Its
cport on the Arizona land bill , recommending
ts passage over the president's veto It may
o takerl up and It will probably arouse con-
Idcrablo discussion.
SIi' < lill WIIM LOIIK : Uelnyetl.
WASHINGTON , March S. By direction of
lie president a medal of honor has been
warded to Orville T. Chamberlain , captain
ompany G , Fourth Indiana Infantry , for
most distinguished gallantry In action at the
attic of Chlcamauga , September 20 , 1863.
This officer , while CNposed to a galling flro ,
; otng In search ot another regiment , and
: ocurlng ammunition therefrom for hla own
cmpany. . * . -
GetH a
WASHINGTON , March 8. Justice Brown
f the supreme court last night granted a
upcrsedcas In the case of Joseph R. Dunlop
f Chicago , convicted of sending obscene
newspapers through the United States malls.
Sail was fixed at $10,000. The superscdeas
icccmcs Immediately operative and means
hat Dunlop will not have to go to prisoner
or a year at least.
HEAR ADMIHAL H. WALKEIl DEAD.
IInU Seen Hard Service In Two
Wnm.
NEW YORK , March 8. Rear Admiral
Walker died at his homo In Brooklyn at 3:05 :
this afternoon. Henry Walker was born In
Virginia eighty-eight years ago. His father ,
iVnthony Walker was a college student at
Yalowlth _ John C. Calhoun. When quite
young , the deceased was taken to Ohio , re
ceiving his education at the Chllllcotho
academy. In 1S27 ho became a midshipman
In the navy , being assigned to the frigate
Alert under the command of Lieutenant
Farragut. He waa present at the surrender
of Vera Cruz during the Mexican war , being
executive officer of the brig Vesuvius- . Dur
ing the war of the rebellion ho commanded 1
the gunboats Taylor and Lexington and 1
protected General Grant's arrriy while It was
making Its retreat on the transport. He was
also at the battle cf Fort Henry , In charge
of the gunboat Carondelet. He was success
ful in petting the Carondelet past Island
No. 10 on April 4 , 1862 , whllo the cncmy'r
shots fell on It like ball. For this piece of
work the commander was honorably men
tioned. In 1802 , for his bravery , ho was
made a captain , In 18G7 commodore and a
rear admiral In 1870. One year later ho re
tired , having the proud distinction of being
the first officer to do so voluntarily to glvo
tliu youneer men a chance.
Rear Admiral Walker has been Buffering
since Tuesday last from a severe attack of
the grip , but the Immediate cause ot death
was heart failure. Mr. White , the family
physician , had very little hopes of hie re
covery and the family was prepared for the
worst. For some time before he passed
away ho was unconscious. The wife and fam
ily cf the deceased were at his bedside-
when he expired. He leaves a widow , three
ons and two daughters.
ST. PAUL. March 8. Dr. David Day ,
closely Identified with the history of St.
Paul and the northwest , died at his homo
today , aged 70 years. Ho waa a member of
the legislature , held various appointive state
offices ; for twelve years was St. Paul's post
master , and as such made suggestions , nearly
all of which were Incorporated In the return
postal card.
MILWAUKEE , March 8. George lilies , a
pioneer of Wisconsin , died today , aged 70
years , of paralysis. He built' and was for
merly solo owner of the Plttsvlllo & North
ern railroad , now part of the St. Paul sys
tem. He owned 1 ( JO,000 acres of Wisconsin
pine lands and leaves an estate of $3,000,000.
NEW YORK , March 8. Richard Irvln ,
banker , died at his home in this city today
from a complication of kidney and heart
troubles. Ho had bc < on suffering from these
troubles for three weeks. Mr , Irvln was CO
years old. He organized the banking and
brokerage firm of Richard Irvln & Co. Ho
was well known for philanthropic works
and was a member of the Union league ,
Tuxedo , City ar J other clubs. Ho loaves a
widow , but no children.
BAY ST. LOUIS. Miss. , March S. Colonel
D. R. Garrison of St. Louis , Mo. , brother
of the late Commodore C. K. Garrison of
New Yolk , died hero this morning of
pneumonia , aged 81.
YANKTON , 8. D. , March S. W. A. Bur-
lolgh , one of the best known pioneer poli
ticians , died here last night of paralysis
-fter an Illness lasting over three years , at
the uge of 75. Dr. Uiirlelgli rame to Da
kota thirty-fix years * ago as an appointee of
President Lincoln , Hlu abll'ty wan readily
recognized and ho was repeatedly sent to
congress , the legislature of both Dakota
and Montana and was during Us tlmo a MIV-
censful steamboat owner and government
contractor. Ho In thu father rf Andrew F.
liurlelgh , receiver of the Northern Pacific
road and the aon-n-la-.v : of ex-Governor A.
J , Faulk of this state.
NEW YORK , March 8. Andrew Ham-
mersley , the lawyer , died tonight at his
home In iliU city. He was 0 yean old and
had been suffering for many rnontlm from
a ccmpl.catlon of dlfcutcs. A brother of
the deceased , Louis Hammerxley , was the
fiat husband of the prevent I ady Bcrei-
ford.
MOTOIUIAX DID NOT OIIT.V OUDnilS.
Tire Klcclrlc Cnm Collide In Connr-
< tiioiicp nnil Mini } * People Injured.
ST. LOUIS , March 8. Aa Iho result ot the
disobedience ot orders by J. A. Alkcn , motorman -
man , a terrible head-end collision occurred
ttici evening about C o'clock , between two
cars of the newly completed Klrkwood Elcc-
trlo railroad , which connects the suburban
town ot Klrkwood with this city. Both cars
tov
were badly smashed , four men were probably
vfa
faulty Injured , twcnty-nlno badly hurt nnd
between twenty and thirty others lew seri
ously ' Injured.
The name ! ) of the fatally Injured arc : J.
AJ . Alkcn and Sam Smith , motormen ; J , L.
Jones ( , claim agent Missouri , Kansas & Texas
railroad , and Richard Lonagan , Insurance
agent.
The Klrlcwooil Electric railroad has Just
been completed and great crowds were taking
advantage of Its being Sunday to patronize
the lino. Every car wna crowded. The
line Is a single track system , with switches
at Intervals to bo used for the passage of
the cars. It was the disobedience of a rule
providing that cars going in a certain direc
tion should keep a siding until the next car
In the other direction had passed that caused
the accident. An castliound car , with J. S.
Pcacclcy as conductor and J. A. Alken as
inotorman , stopped nt a elding about ono
mlle this eldo of Klrkwood. The westbound
car not appearing , the carmen decided to try
. to make the town In a Hying trip. They
had almost reached the end ot their Journey
when the other car came around a curve
and both craeheil together. The eastbound
car was running at the rate ofnt , least thlrty-
flvo miles an hour , whllo the other had at
tained a speed of fifteen miles an hour.
The passengers were thrown In a pile by
the Impact , which was terrible. J. A. .Alken ,
motorman of the castbound car , and Sam
Smith , molorman of the westbound car , were
token out of the wreck with many bones
broken and Injured Internally. It Is thought
they will dlo. Among the passengers the
most badly injured were : J. L. Jones , claim
agent of the Missouri , Kansas & Texas rail
road ; iRIchard Lonngan , Insurance agent.
Neither can live. It Is thought. They were
all residents of St. Louis. Twenty-nine pno-
eongers , men , women and children , were
taken out , some with limbs broken nnd
bodies bruised , but Lt Is thought that no
others will die as thd result of the Injuries
received. Between twenty and thirty others
received less serious Injuries. Help was sent
from Klrkwood , Webster Grove anil St. Louis
and the Injured were taken to hospitals , or
to their homos In this city and surrounding
towns.
Motorman Smith and J. L. Jones , who
were taken with the other Injured to the
North Side Inn , Klrkwood , are expected to
die' before morning.
WOULD AVII'E OUT THE TAX 1.151'Y.
Senator IlnliiN Confident Hln Pi t
MviiNiirvM Wilt Ilecouie I.IUVH.
ROCHESTER , N. Y. , March 8. The Hcra'.d
will tomorrow publish an Interview with
Senator Rains , which Its special correspond
ent had whllo cnroute ( from Albany to
Rochester , of which the following- a part :
"That bill will go through the arasmbly
without crossing another T or dotting an
other ' ! . ' Not only will It be unchanged In
form , but there will ba no delay In sending
It to the governor. " The bill referred to was
the famous Rains bill. Continuing , the sena
tor said : "Tho bill will bp passed In the ssn-
ate Tuesday next' . There Is nothing to pre
vent It from coming to a vote In the soaate
on Friday , although It may goTover toMha
following wbck. But. Inside at.ten-days , that
bill will be In 'tho governor's hands' and
ready for 'his signature. Long before the
end of the current month It will be a law. "
"The- present bill , " the senator said , "taxes
only the seller of Intoxicating liquors. Thlti
bill will ralso approximately $5,000,000 In
revenue. My Idea Is that next year wo shall
make the manufacturers pay their share of
the tax. The manufacturer ought to bo made
to pay aa much as the seller , and $5,000,000
revenue from the manufacturer will prac
tically wipe out'tho state tax.
"How will I reach the manufacturer ? In
the easiest way Imaginable. Simply putting
a tax of GO cents on every barrel of beer
made In Now York state. That's the next
problem to bo tackled. Before I retire from
my term I hope that not one dollar will have
to be raised for state purposes. The Inherit
ance tax , the excise tax and the manufac
turers' tax ought to bring In the $15,000,000
required to run the etato government. Then
the people directly would have only to pay
for local matters and each community could
raise Its local tax In Its own way. "
CONVICTS 11011 THIS CONTllACTOH.
Alileil In DlHiionliiK- GoodH liy Out-
MliHI'nrtlvH. .
WAUPUN , WIs. , March 8. A wholesale
robbery of the penitentiary contract firm by
convlcta In the Wisconsin prison has been
discovered. Convicts engaged In the robbery
received money , various luxuries and liquor
In exchange for the goods. For some time
past Warden Roberts lias suspected that
Illicit traffic was being carried on and dis
coveries were made last night which led
to the arrest of Arthur Miller , a farmer liv
ing near the prison , and Fremont Falrbank ,
a farm hand. R. C. Russel , a convict trusty ,
employed In farm work , several months ago
arranged for other convicts with Miller , It
Is alleged , to receive and dispose of socko
from the knitting department of the peni
tentiary. Money , whisky and other article. )
received. In exchange for the goods were
divided among the convicts. Miller and Fair
banks confessed and told where largo quan-
tltlo.i of the stolen goods could be found.
Hut'scl was placed In solitary confinement
and Miller and Fairbanks were held for
trial.
GIHL TO ANSWER FOR MUKDEH.
Put ItoiiKli on llatH In tlic Family
Coiri-o Pot.
HOLLIDAYSBURG , Pa. , March 8. Minnie
Swanger , the 12-year-old Altoona girl who
placed n dose of Rough en Rats In a coffee
pot , thus causing the death of her uncle , W.
McGregor , and the serious Illness of her
grandmother and two other mcmbors of the
family , was brought Into the Blair county
court for a habeas corpus hearing yesterday.
Her attorney Invoked the legal presumption
that a child under 1C years of age U not
criminally responsible for Its acts , Jndgo
Bell heard the testimony of witnesses who
were called by the district attorney to show
that the girl know the difference between
right and wrong and. then ruled that the
commonwealth had made a prlma faclo case
and that the child know nlio wan doing wrong
when elio put poison In the coffee pot. Ho
declined to liberate the girl and ordered that
she be tried for the crime of murder In the
first degree next week ,
CiitlilfiICiiiptUil tint Safe.
CINCINNATI , March 8.-John II , Pierce ,
cathler and manager of Sol Sharp & Co.'si
pool rooms lit Covlngton , IB mlfalng. Mr-
Sharp left for the New Orleans races last
week. It is now chargert that Plt-rci * went
to the olllco next day , opened the nufip .
cured- over 111,000 In money , a geM watch
and some diamonds , and hua not been nteii
since. It IB bcl'evcd that ho went to Can
ada with a woman ,
I'autor Not ConnervutIve Ui. .
DENVER. March 8.-Rcv. O. L. Morrlll ,
who caino from Minneapolis about a year
ugq to take the pastorate of Calvary Bap
tist church , today tendered hlu rer-lgnntlon.
Mr. Morrlll l a man of original thought
and methods , und It 1 } claimed disagreement
with tlio more conservative element of th
congregation led to tl ) * resignation.
Cotton CoinpreMM Hi-Htroyi'il.
HAYOU SARA , La. , March B.-Thc cot
ton comj > res hero burneil Uila evening ;
? 30l 0.
Mownit-nttt of Ocrim Kti-aiui-rx , Miir , H.
At New York Arrived La Oniscognc ,
from Havre ; California , from Hamburg ;
Nona1. fr m Copenhagen.
At Mobile Arrived Labrador , from Port
land.
STARTED OUT AUSPICIOUSLY
t
Inaugural Meeting of Bnllington Booth'l
Now Salvation Army.
FIVE THOUSAND FORMER COMRADES JOIN
StnicH His PitriuiNO -AHciniit ( q
Urncli Hie ( .rent Middle
\o DvHlrc < o AViiKp
\ilh Salvationist * .
NEW YOHK , March 8. The Inaugural step
made by Dalllngton llootli , the deposed com
mander of the Salvation army In America ,
In starting a rival organization on lines
similar to the ono from whoso command ho
has been relieved , met ( success tonight.
Cooper Union was the scene where the first
gun was fired ) tlio echo ot which thrilled the
hearts o C.COO isoUHcrslio , stnco the com
mencement of the International strlfo which
has sundered Ballington lloolK'n nlloglnnco
to his father , General Hooth ot London , Imvo
remained loyal to the deposed commander
and his wife , Maud Booth. Every seat of
the big auditorium was occupied. The nlslea
were crowded and tlio streets outside were
thronged. The \\omon were the regular Sal
vation army emblem , but the poke hat wan
absent. The men , too , had their badges , but
were no red jackets.
Shortly after 7 o'clock and before the vast
audlcnco li.xJ tlmo to be seated. Captain
Schneider ot the llowery corps sprang on a
chair on the platform and -waved an Ameri
can flag with a painting of Qcorgo Washing
ton. The nudlcnco cheered lustily as they
sprang to their feet and tho- utmost enthu
siasm prevailed. Order had scarcely been
restored when Major Peter Qlen , who wa
among the first of the officers to
tender his resignation after Eva C.
Booth had taken command , appeared
on the platform , waving an Ameri
can flag , arid placed a life-size crayon
painting of George Washington on an easel
In front of the speaker's table. This was
the signal for renewed outbursts of applause.
It was only when Ballington Booth and his
wlfo arrived from tholr Mont Clalr homo
that the audience lost control ot Itself. Their
presence on the platform was the signal for
an outburst of enthusiasm such as had never
before been witnessed In Cooper Union.
MIDDLE CLASS NOT REACHED.
Thcro were eomo music and considerable
signing and the customary religious Invoca
tions , after which Ballington .Booth arose
and said : "Mrs. Booth and myself have not
come here tonight to alluda to the recent sad
trouble. It Is qulto true wo have , after ma
ture deliberation , decided to Inaugurate anew
now movement. Could wo have avoided it , It
would most assuredly have been done on our
part , but wo recognize the great American
people believed that wo had done a work for
nine years , for which they were gratified , and
would not listen to the protest that we should
retire Into private life. Recognizing , as no
did , the largest field In the world , and still
further recognizing that tliero was room In
America for one , two , yea , 100 Salvation ,
armies , wo have resolved , to the best of our
ability , to win over the middle classoa ot the
artisan community of this country , Wo
wish no strife with the Salvation army no
strife , either literal or vdrbal.
"I bellevo that the failure of the so-called
religious organizations of the present day
Is that they do not come down to the living
places where Jeaus Christ wants to bo repre
sented.
"I want to assure Mrs. Booth and those
ofllccrs who have stood by me , that I see
In the distance a movement which tonight
has received its impetus In this great gather-
Ing. I do not want anything that exists in )
the air , but a genuine consecration ot our
soldiers to the faith ot Christ.
"There Is at leaet 46 per cent of the
wage earning populace of the community
who are not Identified with any church or
place of religious worship.
"It Is there \\e want to reach and extend
to thorn the love1 that inspired tlio Nozarcno
on the streets ot Jerusalem nearly 1,000
years ago.
"Oh , how much liateology nnd how little
bcartology tliero la today. Mrs. Booth and
myself have , within the last few days , been
reading the history ot that great American.
soldier , Oeorgo Washington , whoso portrait
stands on this platform tonight. Wo
thought of him and of his goodness of heart
and love for Christ , as he turned away for
a moment from the frightful scenes ot Valley
Forgo and repaired to the woods where
ho knelt In prayer to the dod of his coun
try.
"Whatever be the mission wo undertake ,
It will bear the right stamp and will bo
directed In the right direction. "
OMJ aiAiV MUUIJKHED JIY FOOTPADS.
Iloliln-ry Suii ] > oH ( * < l to He thr Motive
for the Crime.
NEW YORK , March 8. Stephen Powell.
a well known merchant of Hempstcd , L. I. ,
waa struck down and killed within a few
feet ot his own door last night. The mur
dered man , who wan 70 years of age , was
returning after closing his shoo store shortly
before midnight. Ho was found dying on
the road by two of his friends , who saw
two men running down the road , H waa
found that Mr , Powell was blooding to death.
Ho had received a terrible cut across tlio
face and another across the wrist , and still
another on the back of tbo head , It is be
lieved , from the blunt part of an ax or ham
mer , which almost crushed In Mo skull. Ho
was taken to his homo , where ho died within.
half an hour , Mr. Powell was In tha habit
of carrying a large cum of money anil It Is
thought that robbery was the object of the
murder. They were Interrupted In their
work , however , and secured no booty. Today
three negroes were arrrclcd on suspicion of
the murder. They were Van Ilcnsalaer B Imp-
ton , J , A. Wayne and Arthur Mahow.
I'M viMOII Uuriifd ) IlollliiK Tur.
NEW YORK , March 8. Five worXmen em
ployed by the Standard OH company at
llayoniHN. . J , , were severely burned today
by tlio overflowing of boiling tar from one of
tlid big- tanks at the company's yards. The
In Ui reel im-n are : Michael Doyle and Tim
othy Callalmn , seriously burned about tha
feet , legu and arms , taken to Hayonne hos
pital ; James Donahue , John Ht. John and >
iCrneut Olilscn , feet and ankles burned.
The men were at work at stills , from which
the oil was being pumped Into u tank.
The tar oil boiled over the tildes of the tank ;
In a torrent und Hooded the lloor , It wuu
found linposulb'o to c\oto \ the pipes and the
men muuc a dash to escape. The tolling
lluld poured over them , however , before
they could get away. No one wait fatally
Injured , but all received very eerlous burns.
Liniilic-r Attiiflird fur Tlixi-H ,
WASHHURN , Wl . , March 8-InJunctlons
secured by the A. A. Hlgelow Lumber com
pany , the Keyntono Lumber company , and
the Aeliland Lumber company , restraining
the town Irrnsuier of Wuuhburn from col
lecting the taxes BHBC-naed aulnqt them , liavo
been Ulhsolvtd , and at midnight the town
treasurer attached all lumber nnd teams
of the lilgelow company , Papers are also
In hla Imnda for service Immediately after
midnight tonight for attaching similar prop
erty of the other companies. Tlio amount
of taxes U about 30OX > . The companies
eay tlio uHseefmcntH are excessive.
HIMV Her Olilld Devoured ! > >
BT. LOUIS , March 8.-A special to the
Republic from Geneva , Aln. , tmyx : Mrs.
K. Oden , wife of a farmer who lived In the
western purt of this county , wan burning
mine trash yesterday when , a B par It Ignited
her Bklrt , burning her so tliut be died.
Whllo Hhu Iny KUfferlng agonies , he WUB
forced to witness three large liot'tf devour
her two months old child , who she had
laid on the ground while Blie worked ,
O i i
I'lrUcil I'p li > - n 1'iixxliitf Hhli.
ANNA1 OL1H , Md. , March 8 , Hamilton
Gail and John Cotron , the fit , John's college -
lego utudcnU who were swamped on a
nuptha launch yetlfrday , we're pklied up
by u uU-uiiiiT diid landed ut Cartridge ,
M'J.

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