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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, October 17, 1898, Image 6

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THE OMAHA DAILY BEE : MONDAY , OCTOBER 17 , 1898.
MORE HOPEFUL TONE IN BONDS
Upward Tendency Indicated in Heavy
Metropolitan Transactions.
WESTERN CAPITAL INVESTS IN MORTGAGES
" \Vlirnt Movement Alironil Mity Iniluce
a Freer lluyliiK of Ilnllivay Hc-
curl tlen Jin vcineiit
of Trade.
NEW YORK. Oct. 16. ( Special. ) Henry
Clews of the banking house of Clews & Co. ,
cay a :
Tlio half pessimistic mnotl that has pre
vailed In Wall street for the last month
shows symptoms of change to a more
hopeful tone. The Improvement Is hardly
traceable to any new happenings ; it Is
rather due to the pressure of the large ac
cumulations of Idle capital now seeking em
ployment and to a conviction among In
vestors that they are not likely to profit
much by waiting for lower prices. Thy Im
proving tendency has naturally made . .a np-
poarnnce primarily In the bond lint , In
which the transactions have been unusually
large.
It deserves note that this demand for
mortgages Is not wholly from local sources.
Two successive prosperous years of Interior
trade have caused the west and southwest
nn Important accumulation of profits , and
merchant ! ) and mamifncturprs have ac
quired surpluses which they are now seek
ing ( o Invest ; and , as this city affords the
largest diversity of Investments , that de
mand principally centers here. Hitherto
the trading classes of the Interior have not
been large Investors of their earnings. Thny
have preferred to put their savings Into ex
pansions of their regular business ; but ap
parently a stage has been reached In that
proccus when they can afford to set apart
a portion of their profits for a reserve out-
Hide of their ordinary operations. This Is n
gratifying symptom. It shows that the In
terior trading class have had a steady nm
of prosperity , and arc rising to a > tage of
competency which hitherto has been by no
means general ; and , If this be the case , we
may expect the country demand for securi
ties to assume In future larger dimensions
than hitherto. These buyers are generally
careful In their selections of Investments ,
preferring sound bonds at relatively low
yields of Interest and eschewing any clement
of speculative risk. It would not be sur
prising If the demand from this source In
creases with the marketing of the crops and
the pottlemcnt of credits that usually occurs
at that season.
StoukH Are Improving.
Activity In the bond market Is ordinarily
followed by recovery In the stock market ;
and Unit seems to be the chief reason for
tlio better feeling In stocks that has been
steadily gaining ground during the week.
Another helpful factor 1ms been the fact of
very largo orders having been received for
the export of wheat , which has caused a
nharp revival of the forwarding movement
In that staple. This has been followed by
nn advance In the Dank of England rate of
discount to1 1 per cent , which has checked
n revival of the tendency toward Imports
of gold. These factors have only slightly af
fected stocks ; but , should the European buy
ing of wheat be kept up at the present rate ,
the earnings of the western roads may In
duce a freer buying of wcurltlcs. For the
time being , however.vc have only a trad
ers' market , with no Indication of outsiders
or large local operators taking an active
Interest on the "bull" side.
The absence of speculative operations Is
perhaps to some extent the result of Paris
news respecting the doings of the peace
commissioners. There can bo little doubt
that the reports of probable serious dis
agreements on the Philippine question arc
mainly concocted by the Parisian press In
the Interest of Spain and are therefore not
to be trusted. Nevertheless , It may bo rea
sonably expected that Spain , for a variety
of reasons , Is prepared to take n stubborn
Blond against the annexation of the Philip
pines , and It Is not Impossible that she may
maneuver to make It an open European
question and thereby apply a diplomatic
pressure to force the United States to con
cede somewhat of their demands. It Is not
Inconceivable that a situation of that sort
might give rise to diplomatic animosities
and to apprehensions of n renewal of mili
tary operations. Long-headed operators have
these possibilities In view , and are thereby
to some extent Influenced against taking
long ventures.
There has been. In some quarters , a good
deal of loose talk about the condition of
trade , which has encouraged , the "bears"
nnd led some "bulls" to keep out of the
market. The facts In the caflo arc that In
the west and southwest business is , an a
rule , extraordinarily active and prosperous.
Even In the south which many have as
sumed must suffer severely from 6-cent
cotton business Is fairly active , and the best
opinion there Is to the effect that , owing to
the largo reductions made In the cost of
growing the staple , It can bo sold at that
price wltli a moderate profit. The planters
appear to have widely emancipated them-
iwlvcs from subjection to the factors by rais
ing their own corn , pork and other articles
of subsistence ; which means that , at .last ,
the south has placed 'Itself on the hlghwny
to prosperity. Some complaint , however ,
comes from the districts and the railroads
affected by the yellow fever ; which Is rela
tively a small affair.
Movement of Trade.
To tell the truth , the talk about dullness
of trodo Is a purely local misconception. It
Is not to bo denied that. In many articles ,
there Is still a downward tendency In prices
which , In the wholesale trades , deprives
business of Its snap and makes buying grad
ual and continuous Instead of occasional anil
In large parcels. As New York stands be
tween the Interior buyer and the easttin
manufacturer It Is the focus at whlih this
unsatisfactory movement Is most consp'cu- '
ous , and hence the Impression Is received
that business Is dull , whilst In reality It3
volume will be found , at the end of the sea
son , to have been unusually large. This dif
ference lu feeling between New York anJ
the Interior cities Is nothing new ; It
generally happens In times of disturbance In
prices ; and men competent to deal In stocks
Intelligently should know enough to discrim
inate under such conditions , or they m.\v
have to pay the penalty of mistaken opin
ions.
ions.We
We are disposed to anticipate nn Improv
ing tendency In the stock market pci haps
neither marked nor rapid but Etradv and
healthy. There are certainly no livl factors
In the situation , nor any In sight ; on the
contrary the general condition of affairs IE
healthy and the outlook assuring , and henci
the market has a very firm bottom. It re
mains to bo seen how long operators wll
bo willing to wait for a break of which
there arc at present no signs , and what they
will do when they have been convinced thn
the market cannot be shaken. On the whole
It seems possible that some Improvement li
prices may occur nt an early day.
CONDITION' OF NKW YOIIIC HANKS
iN Ciixli InvreiiNeil Nearly n Sill'
llnu Dot I urn l.iint Week.
NEW YORK , Oct. 16. The Flnanctei
cays :
Owing to the heavy Increase of J16,337,4P <
In the business of New York clearing housi
banks for the week ending October 15 , ro <
Ecrva requirements rose $1,000,000 and over
The gain of five millions In cash due to re
cclpts of specie more than counterbalance )
the extra requirement on reserve account si
that In the face of an expansion of $10,023 ,
300 In loans the surplus cash In banks In
creased nearly a million dollars. This , 1
Is needless to say , Is a very favorable show
in * .
The changes , as usual , can bo traced to tin
operations of a. few banks , one Instltutloi
having made about half the new loans nm
gained accordingly In deposit ? . Hut nsldi
from this there seems to have been a general
oral demand for accommodation that ha ;
swelled the totals of a larger number o
institutions. The banks report n firmer de
mancl for money from the Interior and thcl
shipments lust week aggregated pcrhap
two millions. On the other hand the treas
ury disbursements and receipts of gold fron
abroad resulted In a gain In cash about a
reported In the statement. Tbo Increase li
loans was heavier than anticipated am
caused some surprise. It cannot be set
down to transactions with the treasury , as
the band trannuctlon Is about closed. The
general business conditions and the specu
lative situation docs not seem to warrant
the sudden activity In this particular , and
t Is probable that the lonns reflect an ac
cumulation of foreign credits In the form of
Ions sterling bills rather than domesUo
transactions.
The position of International exchanges ,
owing to advancing rates abroad and the
heavy demand for grain , will tend Inevitably
to the postponement of gold Imports and
their conversion Into sterling loans. This
does not mean that the balance owing to
the United States abroad will bo settled
without gold Imports but that the process
of borrowing by Europe will be repeated.
With about ninety millions of treasury
money In the banks It la difficult to say how
soon the effect of 1898 exports wll bo shown.
One thing Is certain , there Is nothing In the
situation to Indicate an advance In money
rates , as the treasury policy tends to op.o- (
slto rcBUlta.
I113VII3W OF IOXI OX STOCK MAIUCI3T
AVnrn mill Itumorn of AVnm CniiNC liu-
nottleil CoiiilUlon AmorluiiiiH Firm.
LONDON , Oct. 1G. Business on the Stock
exchange last week was small , the prevail
ing Influences discouraging buyers. Though
war Is not looked for between Orent Britain
and France , the Fashoda affair Is a grave
matter , while the reported military con
spiracy nnd the strikes In France , with the
activity of the anarchists , are additional
disturbing factors. The only wonder Is that
the relapse In prices was no greater.
The American market was the only one to
display strength and firmness , these charac
teristics being entirely duo to New York
buying. At the close of the week , however.
Americans were weaker. Illinois Central
shares nnd Union-Pacifies fell $ J of a point ,
Union Pacific preferred ' ,4 , Central Pacific
ordinary % , Louisville and Nashville H.
Chicago , Milwaukee & St. Paul 5-8 , Northern
Pacific G-8 , Northern Pacific preferred Vi ,
Erie ordinary 3-8. Erie preferred . New
York Central V4. Wabash preferred Vt , Wn-
bash "IJ" debentures U , Norfolk & Western
preferred VI , Norfolk & Western common
1-8 , Missouri , Knnsnn & Texas 1-8 , Southern
1-8 , Denver R. Rio Grande preferred 'i.
Denver & Rio Grande ordinary 1-8 , Atchlson.
Topcka & Santa Fe preferred U. Atchlson ,
Topekn & Santa Fe common V4 , adjustment
gold bonds rose 14 point , and Baltimore &
Ohio ordinary Vz point.
The advance In the bank rate was a dis
tinct surprise and money was forced to fol
low the bank's lead. Discounts were from
3 G-8 to 3 % per cent from day to day and
3V4 per cent until Monday nt 3 o'clock.
MmtelieMler Textile I'utirleN.
MANCHESTER , Oct. 1C. The market last
week wan strong with n large , and well dis
tributed demand nnd good dally business.
Calcutta continues a large buyer of shirting
and dhootlcs , and nil the miscellaneous
markets are taking freely. Yarns were
strong and cops were particularly strong and
scarce. There are practically no stocks ,
either goods or yarns , while , engagements
are considerable and the position generally
has scarcely ever been moro hciSthy than at
present.
OMAHA C2I3XI3HAIj MAHKI3T.
Condition of Trade nn l ( Itiotut IOIIH on
S tuple mill Fntipy I'roiluer.
EGOS Good stock , 16c.
BlTTTBR-Common to fair , 1012c ; sep
arator , 22c ; gathered creamery , 2021c.
LIVE POULTRY Hens , 5K Cc ; old roosters
ters , 4c ; spring chickens , CV6Q7c ; ducks , 6 ®
6c , geese not unntcd.
GAME Teal , blue wing. $1.75 ; grcenwlng ,
$1.50 ; mixed , $1.75i2.23 : prairie chickens ,
young. $3.DO ; old , $2.50.
PIGEONS Live , per doz. , 75a
VEAL Choice , 9c.
VEGETABLES.
CELERY Per bunch. [email protected]
ONIONS New , per bu. , [email protected]
BEANS-Hnnd-plcked navy , per bu. , $1.30
POTATOES Per bu. , SCkfj Oc.
CABBAGES-Per Ib. , crated , Ic.
TROPICAL , FRUITS.
ORANGES-Seedllngs , $2.75 ; Mediterra
nean swestB , $3.00.
LEMoNS-Callfornla , $8.00 ; fancy Mes
sina. $ [email protected] ;
BANANAS Choice , large stock , per
bunch , $2.00 < S2.25 ; medium sized bunches ,
FRUITS.
APPLES-Per bbl. , Jonathans , $3.50 ;
choice shipping stock , $3.00 ; other stock ,
$2.50 ; Michigan apples , $3.25ff3.50.
PEACHES-Cnltfornln. 20-lb. case , $1.10.
PLUMS-Oregon. $1.0001.25.
PEARS Bartlett. California , out of the
market ; other varieties , $2.00(1/2.23. ( /
GRAl'ES-Callfornla Tokays , $1.5031.65 ;
New York trapes. 15o.
CRANBERRlES-Wlsconsln , per box ,
$1.25 ; Cape Cods , per bbl. , $ [email protected]
MISCELLANEOUS.
NUTS Almonds , per Ib. , large size , 12IJJ
13c ; small , lie ; Brazils , per Ib. , 9010c ; En
glish walnuts , per Ib. . fancy soft shell , 11 ®
12c ; standards , S09c ; filberts , per Ib , , lOc :
pecans , polished , medium , C4j > 7c ; extra
largo , i09c ; large hickory nuts , $1.00111.10
per bu. ; small. $1.1501.25 per bu. ; cocounutn ,
per 100 , $1.50-35.00 ; peanuts , raw , G&c ;
roasted , 7',4c.
MAPLE SYRUP-Flve-gal. can , each ,
$2.75 ; gal. cans , pure , per doz. . $12 ; half-
gal , cans. $6.25 ; quart cans , $3.50.
HONEY Choice white. 12Hc.
DATES Hallowce , 60 to 70-lb. boxes , 6Hc ;
Salr , 6c ; Fard , 9-lb. boxes , 9c.
FIGS Imported , fancy , 3-crown , 14-lb.
boxes , lOc ; 5-crown , 44-lb. boxes , 13c ; 3-lb.
boxes. 22&23c per box ; California , 10-lb.
boxes , $1.
CIDER-Per half bbl. , $3.25Q3.50.
HIDES , TALLOW , ETC.
HIDES-No. 1 green hides , 7c ; No. 2
green hides , Gc ; No. 1 salted hides. Sftc ; No.
2 salted hides , 7c ; No. 1 veal calf. 8 to 12
Ibs. , 9u ; No. 2 veal calf , 12 to 15 Ibs. , 7c.
TALLOW , GREASE. ETC. Tallow , No.
1 , 3c ; tallow , No. 2 , 2 c ; rough tallow , Ifcc ;
white grease , 2V44f2c ; yellow and brown
grease , iy.i2Vic.
SHEEP PELTS Green salted , each , 15 ®
75c ; green salted shearings ( short wooled
early skins ) , each , 15o ; dry shearings ( short
wooled early skins ) . No. 1 , each , 5c ; dry
flint , Kansas and Nebraska butcher wool
polls , per Ib. , actual weight , 4Q5c ; dry flint ,
Kansas and Nebraska murrain wool pelts ,
per Ib. , actual weight , 35f4e ; dry Hint , Colorado
rado butcher wool pelts , per Ib. , actual
weight , 4SBc ; dry flint. Colorado murrain
wool pells , per Ib. , actual weight , 3Jj4c.
NEW YOIIIC G13M2HAI , BIAUKI2T.
Quotutlonn for the Dnjr on General
CoiumodKlen.
NEW YORK , Oct. 15. FLOUR-Recelpts.
14.607 bbls. ; exporls , 20,209 bbls. ; market
nrm ; spring patents , $3.90g > 4.50 ; win
ter stralghtH , $3.4CKT3.60 | ; winter patents ,
$3.755.85 ; spring clears , $3.15f3.40 ; extra No.
1 winter , $2.kOi(3.00 ( ; extra No. 2 winter , $2.65
C2.75 ; no grade. $1.72V4 , to arrive. Buckwheat -
wheat Hour , dull and easy.
BAHLEY MALT Dull ; western , 65Q5Se
WHEAT-ReccIpts. 216,975 bu. ; exports
B0.1S3 bu. ; spot steady ; No. 2 red , 75 5-Sc
f. o , b. afloat. Options opened slrong on
Liverpool cables , cased off on selling foi
both accounts , but displayed final strenglh
on a renewal of largo export demand'
closed unchanged to } 4c higher ; No. 2 red ,
May , 70 1-81)70 5-8c ; closed. 71c.
CORN Receipts. 246,975 bu. ; exports , 56-
185 bu , ; spot steady ; No. 2 , 375ic f. o. b ,
afloat. Options opened stronger on the
sharp Liverpool advance , but yielding latei
to unloading ; closed dull nt unchanged
prices ; May , 3S B-S-tfSS 7-Sc ; closed , 3S 5-Sc.
OATS Receipts , 150,000 bu. ; exports , 79 , .
9S2 bu. ; spot firmer ; No. 2 , 2Sc. Options dul
and nominal.
HOPS Strong : state , common to choice
1S9G crop. 6HScj 1S97 crop. HiJtlSc ; 1S9S crop
17ii20o ; Pacltlc coast , 1S90 crop , 50Sc ; H > 9 ;
crop. lllOlSc ; 1S9S crop , 17 720c.
WOOL-Dull : fleece. 170-jac.
COTTONSEED OIL-Qulet but Hrm
prime crude , ISe , nominal ; prlmo crude
f , o , b. , milts , lUTi 13V..C , nominal ; priini
Hummer yellow , 22ifi'J2',4c. epot ; bullei
grades , 26.'u27c ; prlmo winter yellow , 27j
* liUTTER-RecelplB. 2,850 pkgs. ; mnrkei
tlrm ; western creamery , 15fii2c ; Elglnx , 22c
CHEESE-Steady ; largo white. S 3-fcc
largo colored , 8 5-SJSic ; Email , 8fi9e.
EGGS Receipts , 4.41S pkgs. ; market llrm
western , IS'/ic.
TALLOW-Steady ; city , 3 D-Sc ; country
3 5-Sjj3 3-So.
RICE Firm ; fair to extra , 4 5-Sfi5c.
MOLASSKS-FIrm ; western. oUic c. I. f.
Buffalo ; 5o'4i' f. o , b. ullout , lo arrive.
METALS Pig Iron slcady ; Houlhern
. $9.7 W1.W ; norlhern , $10.lWifll.50. Copper
llrm ; lake , brokers. $12.0u. Lead. quiet
1 brokers , $3.75. Tin , market iiulet. The mur
I ket Inta Hhown steady ImproveniiMit durlni
the last week. tloKliiB today quite llrm li
nearly all departimnta. lUisliu-bs wni
i rather light today , but has picked up ver ;
encouragingly or lute and promises t <
[ broaden materially next week. The llm
naming tlio settling price for leadltu
miners and smellers at the. west quote :
lorn ! nt $3.75 ; copper , $12.00 ; casting copper
$11.00.
Him Friim'lueo Wheat Market.
SAN FRANCISCO. Oct. 15.-WHEAT-
Euay ; December , $1.21 1-8.
BARLEY-Stroncj. . December , $1.85 ,
OMAHA LIVE STOCK BARRET
Customary Black Run of 'Cattlo Finds a
Featureless Trade ,
SOME SIGNS OF WEAKNESS APPARENT
Week CloMCN with All rn < lc lllpclicr
Ttinii Ilint lloKM I'nt on Aiiullicr
Mi-Url mill All Sell MrUklr
lit the Advance.
SOUTH OMAHA. Oct. 15.
Cattle. Hog . Sheep.
IlecclptH today . 1.W2 4,801 1,158
Oftlclnl Monday . G.377 3.00S
Olllcinl Tuesday . C.S70 S.MK 9.712
Oniclal Wednesday . 6,189 7.M1 7.SRS
Ofllclnl Thursday . 5,353 6,406 6,288 ,
OHIclal Friday . 2'jll 4.4JS C.Hf
Total for the week . 23.5S2 33,090 36 , ; S
Total for last wtsek . 33,919 35,973 3f > ,90
Total for week before. . .27,991 41,100 15-t ; )
Week ending Sept. 24. . . .24,243 31.403 24,367
Average price paid for hogs for the last
several days with comparisons :
is3S.U'97.rSM.1895.l894118)3.1892. | | | ] | |
Indicates Sunday.
The official number of cars of stock
brought In today by each road was :
Cattle. Hogs. Sheep. H'r's.
C. , M. & St. P. Ity 5
Missouri Pacific Ry. . . 19 5
Union Pacific System. 1U 10 4
F. , E. & M. V. R. R. . 2 20 . . 1
S. C. & P. Rv 1
C. . St. P. . M. & O. Ry 3 6
1) . & M. R. U. R 25 28
C. . K. & Q. y 7
1C. C. & St. J 1
C. , R. I. & P. Ry. , c. . . . 3
C. , It. I. & P. Ity. , w. 1 1
Total receipts . . . . 67 86 4 1
The disposition of the day's receipts was
as follows , each buyer purchasing the num
ber of head Indicated :
Buyers. Cattle. Hogs. Shocp.
Omaha Packing- 500
G. H. Ilamtnuiid Co l.OOJ
Swift and Company 5 > 0 1,105
Ctldahy Packing Co 136 1,232 26
Armour & Co 4 1.3GS 15
11. Becker & Degan 549
Vansant & Co 66
Benton & Underwood. . . . 19
Huston & Co 50
Hill & Huntzlnger 9
Hammond. Kansas City 212
Cudahy , Kansas City. . . . 427
Other buyers 200 . . . . 1,439
Left over 1,000
Totals 1,700 5,739 2,500
CATTLE There was the usual light Sat
urday's run of cattle and a considerable
proportion of the few reported In did not
iirrlvo until late , so that there was not
enough of any one kind of cattle on sale to
create an active or Interesting market. In
fact the trade was without feature of Im
portance , except that tlio usual Saturday's
dullness and weakness were apparent.
The cattle market for the week has been
In exceptionally good condition and sellers
have generally been well pleased with re
sults. The receipts have not been as large
as for the week before , but a little lamer
than two weeks ago and larger by scveial
thousand head than three weeks < igo , so
that there has been no occasion for eoin-
plalnt on the score of the number of cattle
available. However , the packers have com
plained of a shortage of beef steers and the
market In consequence has been very strong.
Irass beef sold as high as ever and the
'ew desirable cattle received met with
ready sale and at prices as high us any
: lmo thla season. Cornfed cattle gradually
firmed up during the week and at the clu.e
are lOiRlSc higher than last week a.ul al
most as high as they have been any time
this season.
Cows and heifers w-lre 'n very fair re-
riuest nil the week and the arrivals were
kept well cleared up. Valu-is cm that kind
of stock did not Bhow much change. The
same was true of bulls , stacs , elc. Vcol
calves were In good demand all the week at
strong prices.
The most of the cattle received during
the week answered to the description of
stockcrs and feeders. As a very l.'vely
country demand was developed , the market
steadily gained In str ° ngh under the in
fluence of Iho free buying nnd nt the close
of the week Is lOff'Sc hlgner than the low
time the middle of last week. The advance
lias been the most on the medium to prett ; '
tnlr cattle , ns they Huflered the most de-
cnne from the excessive receipts last wei-k.
Choice feedrs and atocltors did not decline
very much when other cattla were Lreak-
InK badly , as they were at no tlmo plonfful
nnd In consequence they luivo not aluinced
so very much this week.
HOGS There was a very fair run of hogs
for the last day of the week , though the
receipts fell short of last Saturdays and the
Saturday before by a few loads. The mar
ket wax In very satisfactory condition as
regards the selling' Interests , values being-
5c higher with the. movement active at the
advance. Practically everything In sold
early In the morning- , though the close of
the market was deferred somewhat by the
late arrival of nomc of the trains. Heavy
packing- hogs Bold very largely at $3.65W
3.67 ! , with some prime heavy at $3.70 ®
3.72V4 ; good light hogs brought $3.75. Yes-
terdny , It will be remembered , cdnsldera-
bly over half of all the hoga here sold at
$3.6033.65.
It will be noted from the figures at the
head of the column that the receipts for
the week have been of fair proportions ns
compared with previous weeks. The mar
ket ns a whole has been In better condi
tion than It was during the previous week ,
that Is , prices have averaged a little higher.
The week opened with an advance , but
there was a sharp break on Tuesday. From
that day on the tendency of the market
was gradually upward , but It was not until
Friday that prices were back again to
where they were on the first day of the
week. The advance at the close of the
week carried the. market to a point that
was lOc higher than the close of the previ
ous week , nnd the highest that It has been
any day since October 1.
SHEEP There was very little In the way
of either sheep or lambs to offer today , nnd
the market was without change of any
kind. Desirable fat sheep would , without
doubt , have brought fully steady prices.
The. Hheep market has been exceedingly
good all this week. The arrivals were the
largest In a good many weeks , but that
did not appear to make any difference
with the market , as the demand was cor
respondingly brisk. Thin Is true of all
kinds , fat sheep and lambs , as well nn
feeder and stockers. The tendency of the
market has been strong , and for the week
values are a little higher. Quotations are ;
Good grass westerns , $4.1004.25 ; fair to peed
grass westerns , $3.90 4.00 ; good yearlings ,
$4.20 ( 4.35 ; good to choice lambs , $5.15(415.35 ( ;
fair to good lambs , $ t.90iS5.00 ; feeder weth
ers , 2-ycnr-oldn and over , $3.85)4.00 ) ; feeder
yearlings , $4.0004.25 ; feeder lambs , $4.5CK8
4.S5 ; cull sheep , $2.5003.00 ; cull lambs , $4.000 *
4.25.
CHICAGO I.IVI2 STOCK MAHICKT
OfTerliiKN ° ( Medium Grade Cuttle Sell
Slnivly nt UiieliuiiKeil 1'rleea.
CHICAGO. Oct. 15. As Is usual on Saturday -
day the cattle receipts today were too small
to make a market. The few offerings of me-
dlum grade cattle were disposed of slowly
at prices unchanged from yesterday. A
large Increase In receipts Is looked for Mon
day. Trade In hogs was active nnd while
common droves sold lower , desirable offer.
Incs were 2'MiCc higher. Hogs sold any-
wlu're from $3.40f(3.50 ( for common droves
up to $3.s : < fi'3.95 for the best lots , the bulk
of the offerings crossing the scales at $3.7 (
4T3.90. Pigs sold largely at $3.35 < Jfi.60. Thert
wuj a fair business In sheep and lambs foi
Saturday ul prices at about yesterday's
closing point. Prime native wethers soli ]
at $ l.50ii4.65 ; fair to choice. $3.75 l.35 ; fall
to prime western range sheep , $ I.154.50 |
prime shipping lambs- brought J5.S5UC.10
commoner grades , JI.5Ofi5.50.
Receipts : Cattle. 400 head ; hogs , 17XX (
head ; sheep , 4.000 head.
IVIIIIMIIH City l.l\e Sloek.
KANSAS CITY , Oct. 15.-CATTLE-IIO.
celptH , 1,115 head ; for Hie week , 19OiiO head
The large supply mainly range slock''offer
Ings of dressed b > ef steers too light It
meet demands ; llrm to lOc higher ; butehfci
nnd canning- stock , good demand nm
steady prices ; native and Rood dtyle 'rnngi
fecderx , blu demand ; atcady to a shad <
higher ; common quality about Ktently
clioU-o heavy steers , $5.30fi5.75 ; medium
$4.60416.25 ; Hunt weights. JI.4W5,35 : rtlocken
and feeders. $ 'J.3wirl 90 ; butcher cows am
heifers. K.WI 1.75 : buteher bulls , JXTOfja.M
western steers , $3.3i > } ( l.iW : western cows
$2.90 > fi3.90 ; Texas steers. $3.00'iJ4.30 ; Texni
butcher cows , ! .70 < ij3.35 ; canning stock
HOGS Receipts , 4.0SO head : for the week
56,000 head. Trading a Uttla more animate * .
this week and prices advanced BfilOc ; con
ditions moro tncouniRltfc , heavy noK . $3.60
( (3 75 ; mixed , J.I.&Off TSF lights , tt.M > if3. < v ; . I
SHEEP-Rcccliitn..Jt4ij > ) head : for the !
week , 17,500 head ; sdplny too light to meet i
demand ; nil KrndcB-flntiKhterltiK sheep , Mf I
20c higher ; good AuMofs brought tlrm I
prices ; culls lowcniTiaUve lambs , Jo.OOfj5.rAj ; >
native , muttons , J4WittT,0 ; western lambs ,
$4. ! a5.35 ; western * > tituttons. $3.75'd4.35 ;
range feeding- lamb * , ' $4.50 < Jf4.75 ; range
feeding sheep , $3.50 < fi-t.lO ; stock ewes ,
$3.25(03.85. ' { ' I' o.
Si. I.oulH I. lye Stuck.
ST. LOUIS. Oct. ' 15.-CATTLE Receipts ,
700 head , Includlngi'.liO/Texniis ' : shipments ,
900 head ; market dulKnnd steady ; fair to
fancy native Rhlpillflg'and export steers ,
$4.754(5.40 ( ; bulk of salts. $5.15f/5.30 ; dressed
beef and butcher Bteern , $3.SWi5.25 ; bulk of
sales. $4.rx > it5.00 ; steers under 1,000 pounds ,
$3.25 3.70 ; bulk of waled. $3.23fl3.90 ; stotkcra
and feeders , $2.50ifN.50 ; bulk of sales , $ .3.50 ®
5.23 ; cows and heifers , $2.0004.50 ; bulk of
cows , $2.40i(3.25 ( ( ; Texas nnd Indians , J2.90.ff
4.25 ; bulk of sales , $3.45CP4.05 ; cows and
heifers , $2.003.40.
3.93.
SHEEP Receipts , none ; shipments , 150
head ; market nominal ; native muttons ,
$4.00"if4.60 " ; eitlls and bucks. $2.0003.75 ; stock-
era , $2.75Q3.40 ; lambs , $4.10K5.90.
N MV York Iilve Stock.
NEW YORK. Oct. 15. BEEVES Re
ceipts. 264 bend ; feeling steady ; exports ,
6SO cattle.
CALVES Receipts , 175 head ; quiet ; poor
to medium , $3.001i4.70 ; western calves , $3.50.
SHEEP AND LAMBS Receipts , 2,786
head ; sheep , steady ; lambs , weak to lOo
lower ; sheep , $3.30y4.60j lambs , $5.50W6.50 ,
mainly $5.&GcJ | 6.00.
HOGS Receipts. 4 , ! > 76 head ; nominally
weak at $4.0004.25.
St. .loNepli Live Stock.
ST. JOSEPH. Oct. 15. ( SpecIal.-CAT- )
TLE Recelpls , 600 head ; steady ; natives ,
$ l.50fiC.25 ; tows nnd heifers. $1.6034.00 ;
stockers and feeders , $3.25 < fi 5.00.
HOGS Receipts , 4.bOO head ; strong to 5o
higher ; top , $3.75 ; balk , $3.62V4fl3.67 > ,4.
SHEEP Receipts , 20 head ; firm.
Clneliuiatl Live Stuck.
CINCINNATI. Oct. 15. HOGS Market ac
tive nt $3.63 3.85.
CATTLE-Steady nt $2.5MI.S5.
SHEEP Market steady at $2.254.15 ;
lambs , steady at $4.0005.75.
Stuck In
Record of receipts of live stock at thu
four principal markets for October 15 ;
Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Omaha . 1,832 4,801 1,168
Chicago . 400 17,000 4,000
Kansas oty . 1,115 4,080 1,400
St. Louis . 700 3,000
Tolals . . 4,007 28.881 6,558
CHICAGO CHAIN AM ) PROVISIONS.
FeiitureH of the Trad I UK and C
1'rleen on .Saturday.
CHICAGO , Oct. 15. With the demand for
flour subsiding nnd n reappearance of the
weakness In cash grain In the northwest
there was a disposition In the wheat pit
today to act cautiously on the buying side.
December closed l-8c lower ; corn left oft
unchanged to 1-Sc lower ; outs declined 1-Sc
lower ; pork Is unchanged , to 2V4u down ;
lard 2HT5e | higher nnd ribs unchanged.
Before the opening there weru reports
received from Liverpool that the market
there had recovered all that It lost yester
day. The news had nn appreciable effect
on Ihe early t null up here , first-class beliiH
nt an advance over night of l-8ij3-8c.
Though New York continued to send re
ports of large export engagement ! ) , the
news had much less Influence than usual ,
the prevailing oplhldn being that reports
of previous days tlll week were very much
exaggerated and that the advices today
might bo duplicates. One unfavorable
feature of the market , and one which had
a great deal of Influence In shaping the
course of prices , was the weakness of the
cash Brain in the northwest and reports
from Minneapolis Of a'pause In the demand
for Hour. The primary market receipts lor
the day were. 1,5S2,000'bu. , against 1,203,000
bu. a week ago. Chicago received 275 cars ,
against 133 last year , and Minneapolis and
Duluth 1,122 cars , as compared with 1.122
a week ago nnd' 1,170 the corresponding
day the year before. The reports of the
export engagements at the seaboard finally
ran up to 1U4 boatloads. This was entirely
Ignored , however , nnd the market con
tinued to weaken during the last half hour.
Influenced by lack of speculative demand
and free liquidation , by discouraged longs.
December opened % c higher at tfj'A iCS 3-bc.
ranged Irregularly downward to iM',4c ' and
closed at 64V4fa64 6-Sc.
A sharp upturn at Liverpool caused corn
to ac.ll early at the highest price touched
on the present rise. Commission houses
executed a fair number of buying orders ,
but the demand proved Insufficient to hold
the market , there being considerable long
property for sale and one or two prominent
elevator Interests uclllng quite freely. Re
ceipts were 622 cars. December began 1-8 ®
3-So higher nt 31 1-SW31 3-Sc , declined to
30 7-Sc nnd closed at 30 7-84J31c.
There was quite an active trade for the
first hour In oats and the market ruled
strong at advanced values. Uecelpts were
large and almost everybody had something ;
to sell and prices started on the downward
nnd winding up at the bottom flgtire. De
cember closed 1-Sc higher at 23'ic , sold up
to 23c , then fell to 23Vic , the closing figure.
An advance of 5c In hogs nt the yards
and moro assuring news regarding the yel
low fever situation In the south were the
strengthening Influences In provisions at
the opening. The weakness In grain , how
ever , nnd free sales from brokers caused
a substantial reaction later. December
pork opened 7HQ10C. up at $9.30 , declined to
$9.1714 and closed at $3.20 ; January lard
started r > Q7V4c higher nt $3.07'fc , weakened
to $5.02'A and closed at $5.0T : January ribs
began 5 i7c up nt $1.80 4.82 * , held steady
at $4.82 % , then fell oft to $4.75 and rallied
to $4.77V4 at the close.
The lending futures ranged ai follows :
Article * . Open. UtrU. Low Yeat'y.
84M C5H
OiM C4U esovt
66M
31 31 301 , 30H
SOU1 31 son SOU-ill 31
33UM 33 > i 33USK
23 22W8H
JIM
810 R 10 70S 707H
oao 030 0 17K O'JO B 22H
497K BOO P6 49V 402H
607H 607H 603 SOS
B37K 637M C374 S30
480 476 77M
No. 2.
Cash quotations were ns follows :
FLOUll Steady ; sprlnp special brands
tl.OOQ'4.10 ; hard patents , i4.10ft4.uOwinter ;
straights. f3.0 33.20.
WHEAT No. 3 spring. 64iQC3c ; No. 2 red ,
.
CORN No. 2. M 550 7-Sc.
OATS-No. 1. 2ic ; No. 2 white , 25Q2Co ;
No. 3 white , 24J25c.
HYE No. 2 , 4W49V5C.
HAHL1SV 32V6fi45c.
S13KDS Flaxseed , No. 1 , 91cj prime tim
othy seed. $2.40.
PROVISIONS Pork , mess per bbl. , J7.9Q
5J7.95. Lard , per 100 Ibs. , $5.02 > > .f.i5.G. ( IJacon ,
short rlba sides ( loose ) , J5.2005.SO. Dry
salted shoulders /boxed ) . { 4.06l.iE ! ' , & ; short
clear ald-a ( boxed ) . J5.25fc5.35.
WHISKY Distillers' finished goods , per
gal. , J1.25.
SUGAHS-Cut loaf. $5.47 ; granulated , $5.14 ,
The following are the receipts and ship
ments for today : " '
Hitltlnidrc1 MiirUet.
DALTIMORB , OU. 45. PLOUU Firmer
receipts , 22.020 Lbls. ; exports , 33,54 :
bbls. : western 'BXW ' * , $2.5off2.kOi west ,
ern family , $ .l.2 ft2.GO-wlntcr patent , $3.f.T > ij
3.S5 ; spring patcu.1) J4.25Q4.40 ; Rye extra
! .751(4.00 ( ; rye Hour1-n v.dlum to choice , J2.7'
t/3.00.
WHEAT Firmer ; ppot nnd month , 72HC
72ajc ; receipts , 38.744 bu. ; exports , 12S.137 bu.
southern wheat , by sample. 67j73Kc ; south
crn wheat , on grade , . CSy73e.
CORN Firmer j apot and month , 35 3-Sfj
K' c ; steamer mixed , 313-Sj34 < ic ; receipts
111,922 bu. : exportr , 135,321 bu. ; snuthcrt
white. 35fj3Ge ( ; southern , yellow , SCJ/'SG'ic. '
OATS Firm ; No , 2 white , western , 2SV4C
receipts , 18,750 bu.
RYE Strong nnd higher ; No. 2 western
55c ; receipts , 3,32 $ bu , : exports , 4& & > ,237 bu.
11UTTKK Market steady ; creamery , 1 !
OlSVic ; Iowa northwestern ladle , 15o ; west'
ern store packed , 12il3c ; Elgin , 22c.
KGG8 Firm nnd unchanged ; fresh , 15
jjli'ic : western , IMil&Vie.
CHEESE Steady ; new cheese , full crean
Nt-w York , 9Vsi(4Ji ? per pound.
St. 1.00N MnrUet.
ST. LOUIS. Oct. 15.-Fr.OUR-Unchnngcd
patents , JJ.45U3.CO ; straights , J3.1&1J3.25 ; clear
J2.75iQ3.00 ; low to decided medium. J2.55.
WHEAT Easy and fractionally lower
spot , lower : No. 2 red. In elevator , 79o bid
on track , 7C-371c ; October , te\i \ < 3 bid ; 71i
asked ; December. C8 l-8c ; May , 67 7-Sc asked ;
No. 2 hard , cash , 64Vtu < < tc.
CORN Fractions lower for future * ; spot ,
steady ; No. 2 cauli , 30 Vic I December , 29i < P
29 7-Sc ; May , 81 1-fc.
OATS Futures Irregular , with fractional
changes' ! spot , lower ; No. 2 cash , 22Hc ; De
cember , 23ic bid ; May , 25 < ic ; No. 2 white ,
FU\X8BHD-Nomlnnlly higher nt We ,
HOTTER Firms creamery , l&JjISHc.
POUUTRY-Mnrkct lower nnd dull ; chickens -
ens , spring , 6i7Hc ! : old , MiO'.ic ; ducks , &U ,
OCc : geese. Cc ; turkeys , 7'J'38He. ' '
EQOS-Slcady nt 13c.
LEAD Dull at J3.70.
SPEI.TER-Stendy at JI.S5.
PROVISIONS Pork , Htfndy ; ftandnrd
mess , jobbing , J3. I .aril , higher ; prlmo
steam , $4.75 : choice , J4.0. Dry salt meats ,
extra short , clear , Jo.57m shorts , $5.G2 ! & .
Uncon , boxed shoulders , J4.ST/4 : extra short ,
clear. $5.87m ribs , $6 ; shorts. JC.12V4.
RECEIPTS Flour. 3,000 bbl ? . ; wheat , 137-
000 bu. : corn , 47,000 bu. : oats. 9,000 bu.
SHIPMENTS Flour , 7,000 bbls. : wheat ,
01,000 bu. ; corn , 20,000 bu. ; oats , 14,000 bu.
KuimnN City Ornlii nnd I'rov
KANSAS CITY , Oct. 15. WHEAT-Mar-
cet active nnd steady ; No. 1 hard , C3T < ; < c ;
No , 2 , 61i63c ; No. 3 , S7fClc ; No. 2 red ,
C5 < & Gc ; No. 3 , GK ; 3c ; No. 2 spring , 60V4C !
No. 3. 56 < 758c.
CORN Market lower ; No. 2 mixed , 27 ®
27c : No. 3 , 27c.
OATS-Market steady ; No. 2 white , 23Vi8 >
RYE-Mnrket firm ; No. 2 , 48'4c.
HAY Choice prairie , $7.60 ; choice tim
othy. Jfi.Mtfr7.00.
nUTTER Market nrm ; separator , J9Q21C ;
Inlryt 16c.
EOas-Markct nrm ; fresh. 13V4c.
Clncliinntl Mitrkct.
CINCINNATI. Oct. 15. FLOOR-Dull ;
fancy. J2.9WJ3.20 ; family , J2.25 (2.CO. (
WHEAT-FIrm ; No. 2 red , &SC.
COIIN Steady : No. 2 mixed , 31c.
OATS Firm ; No. 2 mixed , 2H4c.
RYE-Steady ; No. 2 , fdc.
PROVISIONS-I nnl , higher at J4.S5. Ilulk
meats , llrm at J5.37V& . liacon , steady at
$0.50.WHISKY
WHISKY In good demand nt $1.25.
HOTTER Steady : fancy Elgin creamery ,
22c : Ohio. 14 18c ; dairy , 12c.
SOOAR Firm.
ROOS Steady ; 13c.
CHEESE Firm ; good to prlmo Ohio ,
flat , 8V4G9C.
Wool Mnrket.
LONDON. Oct. 16. WOOLr-The. arrivals
of wool for the sixth scries of wool auc
tion sales number 42,215 bales , Including
9,000 forwarded direct. The Imports for the
week were : New South Wales , 2,290 bales ;
Melbourne , I.5S1 bales ; South Australia. ISO
bales ; New Zcnla"jl , l.tiSl bales ; Cape of
Good Hope nnd Natal , 225 bales ; Mar
seilles , 753 bales : liriiKycls , 4,419 bales , and
elsewhere , 112 bales.
Toledo Mnrlcrt.
TOLEDO. Oct. 15. WHEAT-FIrm ; De
cember , CSyc bid.
CORN-Sold light ; No. 2 mixed , 31' c ; No.
3 mixed , 13c.
RYE-Dull and higher ; No. 2. 50Hc
CLOVERSEED Active nnd higher ;
urlmo cash , $4.40.
MlniienpollH AVIient Mnrkpt.
MINNEAPOIJS. Oct. 15. WIIEAT-Mar-
knt weaker ; October , C3c ; December , C15-Sc ;
May , C314c ; No. 1 hard , Glfte : No. 1 north
ern , GS ic1 ; No. 2 northern , 61ic.
FLOUR Unchanged.
BRAN In bulk , $8.50 < Jf9.00.
I.tvrriioot Rrnlii Mnrkpt.
LIVERPOOL. Oct. 15. WHEAT Mnrket
quiet , H4 < ffl',4d higher ; October , 5s 10id ;
December. Ds ! W < d ; March , 5s 9d.
CORN-Mnrket pteuily , l % ? l'iil higher ;
October. 3s 7Vld ; November , 3s 7Vid ; Decem
ber , 33 7Wd ; March , 3s Gx4d.
Phlliiilcliihln MiirUe .
PHILADELPHIA , Oct. 15. BUTTER
Firm ; fancy western criamery , 22c ; prints ,
22c.
22c.EOGS
EOGS Steady : fresh western , 17c ; fresh
southern and southwestern , 16c.
CHEESE Firm.
PEANUTS IX OUKAT PAVOIt.
Their Populnrltr Ilecnmc Geiicrul
After ( lie Civil AVnr.
"The American people are evidently very
partial to pennuts , " remarked a large pen-
nut planter In Virginia to a Washington
Star writer recently , "for there are nearly
4,000,000 bushels of them consumed In the
United States annually. Before the civil
war the peanut was only a holiday luxury
to the majority of the people living In the
north , the day when the circus was In
town , during the country fair and the great
and glorious Fourth of July bolng the prin
cipal occasions that the popular yearning
for the nut was In any measure satisfied.
The product then amounted to barely 500,000
bushels a year.
"At the close of the war when the sol
diers returned north thousands of them had
cultivated such a liking for the nut , which
they had often pulled from the ground and
roasted at their campflres while In Vir
ginia , Tennessee and North Carolina , that
the crop then raised In these states didn't
begin to supply the demand. Wideawake
farmers saw the point , and small garden
patches where peanuts had been grown for
generations were soon abandoned for broad
Delds , and today Virginia and North Carolina
lina are growing 4,000,000 bushels of pea
nuts a year a result due almost entirely to
the civil war and the habit the federal
troops contracted of eating large quanti
ties of the nuts. Naturally , the returned
soldiers' demand for peanuts placed them
within reach of the rural population In the
north , and the nut soon ceased to bo a holi
day luxury.
"When the war broke out most of the
peanuts consumed In this country wore raised
In North Carolina , A great many were also
Imported from Africa. They were of In
ferior quality. In fact , the best ante-bellum
peanuts were poor compared with the nuts
grown today. But the demand for the nuts
In recent years has not had the effect of Im-
BLOOD
POISON
A SPECIALTY
Primary , Secondary or T rl
BLOOD POISON permanently
Cured in 15 to 35 Days.
You can be treated at homo for same
price under same guaranty. If you
prefer to come here we will contract
to pay railroad fere and hotel bill * ,
and no churee If w * fall to cure.
IP YOU HAVE
taken mercury. Iodide potash and still
nave aches and pnlns , Mucous Patches
In mouth , Bore Throat , Pimples , Cop
per Colored Spots , Ulcers on any part
of the body. Hair or Eyebrows falling
out. It la this secondary
I I K' !
We Guarantee to ( Jure
We solicit the mo t obstinate eases
and challenge the world for a case we
cannot cure. This disease has alwayi
baflled the skill of the most eminent
physicians.
tiOO.OOO capital behind our uncondi
tional guaranty. Absolute proofs sent
ealcd on application. 100 page book
sent free.
Adtlrem COOK RU.MHDY CO. , l-llll
Mnionlo Temple , C'Jilcnco , III.
JAKES EB9YD & CO , .
Telephone 10 ! ) . Omaha , Ne i
COMMISSION ,
GRAIN , PROVISIONS and STOCKS
UOARI ) OF TRADB.
Direct ivlr to Clilcasn and New York.
Corrtttpondrntu Jcbn A.v rr n ft Co.
H. R. PENNEY & CO. ,
Itooiii , N. Y. Life llldir. , Oninlia , .feU.
StocksGrainProvisions
Direct \Vlrrm New York , Clilcnico nut ]
IVciteru 1'olut * .
proving the North Carolina pro-hid or In
creasing Us yield to nnjr great extent. Vir
ginia and Tennessee , however , woke right up
under the Increased demand , nnd Improved
cultivation has produced n nut , especially In
Vlrglna , that Is as near perfect as It can be.
"I don't suppose there are many people
who know that the peanut came to this coun
try with the Ural cuvgo of slaves that were
landed on our shores. It la a native of
Africa , and In Its original state as full of
grease almost as a bit of pork. Curtlvatlon
and change of soil have greatly reduced the
oleaginous quality of the nut , although the
North Carolina variety has enough grouse
yet to nnd a ready sale In France , where It
loins Its African ancestor and cottonseed
In supplying not a little ot the olive oil wo
find In the restaurants and family groceries.
Norfolk , Vn. , Is the greatest peanut center
In the world and handles annually 200,000
bags , or 8,000,000 bushel * .
"It Is a pretty sight to see a peanut plan
tation when the vlnen nro In blossom , The
blossoms arc a bright yellow , and the vines
are a vivid grrcu. As soon as the bloftsom
appears a fine branch farms on the vine
and stiootr down Into the ground , The pens , .
as the nuts arc- called on the plantation ,
form on the shoot bcncvUh the ground like
potatoes. When the crop li gathered In Oc
tober the vine Is ploughed up , and the null
hang to the roots. Vines and all are piled
In cocks In the Held , and In twenty days
the nut arc ready to bo pulled off , placed
In twigs nnd taken to the factories. There
they nro clivtnccd of dirt , assorted , polished
In revolving cylinders and put Into bags
ready for tlio market. "
For broken surfaces , eores , Insect bites ,
burns , skin diseases , nnd especially plica ,
there Is one reliable remedy , DeWltt'a Witch ,
Harel Salve. When you call for DeWltt' M
don't accept counterfeit or frauds. You will f
not bo disappointed with DcWltt' Witch '
Hazel Salve.
Of tlio
Trans-
Mississippi TjT
Exposition S
nt
Omaha
Eighteen hundred
and
ninety-eight
Forty-eight
Views (3x7 (
Handsome
ottvenir
of the
Exposition
At the Business Office of The Omaha Bee
2\r. li. Jiy mail S cents extra for postage.
CTURERS
OK OMAHA.
BOILER AND SHEET IRON WORKS
Snecenfinrn Wllaoti t DrnUc.
Manufacturers boilers , smoke stacks and
tirccchlnes , pressure , rendering , sheep dip ,
lard nnd water tanks , boiler tubes con-
ctantly on hand , second hand boilers
tjoufrht nnd sold Special and prompt to
repairs In city or country. 19th nnd Pierce.
BOOTS-SHOES-RUBBERS ,
merioan Hand
Sewed Shoe Go
M'frs | Jobbers of Foot Wear
WESIEIIN AGENTS FOn
The Joseph Banijjau Rubber Co.
f 9. Spragwe & Co. ,
Rubbers and Mackintoshes.
Cor. Eleventh & Farnaiu Wt . , Oiuulin.
F.P. Kirkendall & Bo
Soots , Shoes and Rubbers
Baleiroom * UM-UU-UM Harncjr Btn C
CARRIAGES.
Estab
lished ,
1858.
Siao bpnne Auaiuucni No Horse Motion.
Get a Simpson Buggy with the Atkinson
Spring best and easiest rider In the world.
1400-11 Dodge Street.
CHICORY
he American
I Ghioory
Grower * and manufacturer ! of all foimi of
Chicory Omaha-Fremont-O'NUL
DRUGS.
go2o6 Jackson St.
J. O. niCHAUDSON. Prett
a V. WELLBR. V. Prut.
tvlercor
Tti0
Oh fa am
U'fr * i/lamtard I'hitrinnaeullotu 1'n ara *
tloiil. , s/iec < ul Formulae 1'rfpared to
UrirrXtnti for ( 'utitluotif ,
laboratory , 1UI Ilowud fit , Omaha.
. Bruce & Co.
Druggists and Stationers ,
"Quna ! ) " BpecUItU * .
Oirvra. Wlom and UrandKi ,
Otracr HU > ted LUntty CtrMU ,
DRY GOODS.
E , Smith & Go.
( potter * and Jobber * of
Dry Goods , Furnishing Goods
AND NQTIONa
CREAMERY SUPPLIES
The SharpSes Company
Creamery Machinery
inrt Supplies.
( lollcrs , Engines. Feed Cookers , Wood Pul.
lays , Bhaftlns. Beltlnp , ilutur Paclc-
° " * '
17.809 Stf-
Jon a - - - - -
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES.
W estern EiectricaT
Company
Metrical Supplies ,
Electric Wlrlner Bolls and Gas Lighting
a. W. JOHNSTON. MCT. 1610 Howard St.
John T. Burke ,
CONTKA.CTOK I'OR
ELECTRIC LIGHT
and PO WER PLANTS
424 South 15th St.
FRUIT-PRODUCE.
u Suppjy Go. . .
rro8-irzo Harney St.
Bteam Pumps , Engines and Boilers. Pl
Wind Mills , Bteam and Plumbing
Material. Dtltlne , Hose , Elo.
HARDWARE.
Oector 6 WHhelmy Co
Wholesale Hardware ,
Omaha.
f eo-GIark Androosen
Wholesale Hardware.
Bicycle * and bportliu Good * . 1819.-a.l-2l Uajp-
oojr ftiaot.
Haraey & Go.
Il.lltNKtl , UAItni.l A AND COLLARS
Jol'lert vf I. tatlter , ttailillrt'y Hardware , CU
Wo i-ollclt your order * 1315 Howard Et
S TE A M-"WATEh SlTpp'L IE3.
( jaae-Ghurehill Go. \
1014. 1016 Ooualas Street.
Ifinufacturcri and Jobber * of Bttam. On * & 4
Water Supplies of All Kind *

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