OCR Interpretation


Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, November 01, 1903, Image 27

Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99021999/1903-11-01/ed-1/seq-27/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Dog Racing a Popular Fall Sport
f I
It
YIEW OF KEARNEY FAIR GROUND DURING THE COURSING MEET. Photo by B. D. Butcher. Copyright Reserved.
H
UNTING of hares with fleet-footed
hound : pursuing their quarry
by eight only Is of ancient date.
The dog most used for this sport
Is the greyhound, and the sport
Is techlcally known as coursing. Rules
governing covirsing are numerous. The
mutter of greatest, consequence relates to
the points of the course on which the merits
of the competitors are decided by the
Judges. The points of the course are:
(a) Speed Which Is estimated as 1, 2, orS
points, according to the superiority shown.
(b) The Go-By Two points; or If gained
on what Is known us the outer circle, 8
points. The go-by is where a hound starts
a clear length behind its opponent, and yet
passes him In,' a straight run, and gets
a clear length ahead of him. ' " -
(c) The : Turn One point. The turn is
where the hare Is brought around at not less
than a right angle from her previous line,
or course. --'
(d) The Wrench-Half a point. The
wrench is where the hare Is bent from her
line or course at. less than a right angle.
Where she only leaves her line to suit
herself, and not from the hound pressing
her, no point Is allowed.
(e) The Kill Two points, or In a descend
ing scale, In proportion to the degree of
merit displayed In the kill, which may be
of no value.- The merits of a kill are
estimated according to whether a hound
by his own superior dash and skill bears
the hare, whether he picks her up through
any little accidental circumstances in. his
favor, or whether she Is turned into his
mouth, as it were, by another and com
peting hound.
(f) The Trip One point. The trip, or
the unsuccessful effort to kill, is where the
kare is thrown oft her legs, or where a
.c
4 r t:
' ,. J f . 1 , "
t
J? ATH FINDER AND MIBS L1DDLE IN SUPS FOR FINALS IN THE FUTURITY PATHFINDER. OWNED BY
WILSON & ALLEN, VICTOR, la., Wi.NS.-Copyrlght Reserved by S. D. Butche:
ing the last few years has grown to really
great proportions in the middle -west.. Se v
eral extensive organisations are now de
voted to it and a great deal of money his
been invested by dog fanciers In their ken
nels. Two great meetings were recently
held in Nebraska, one probably first in Im
portance in the Uni'ed States. At Friend
a large number of dogs competed, with re
sults entirely satisfactory to their owners,
but it was at Kearney that the interest
rose to Its real pitch. Here the ' great
Mississippi Valley Futurity, the leader of
all events for the racing dogs, was deu!d3d.
It had the largest number of entries and
starters ever sent to the slips. The All
Age stake was a'.so an Important event,
although it does not mean so much to the
breeders as the Futurity.
During the days at Kearney the weathe,'
was the mo t favo:abla and the sport drew
large crowds to the counting grounds every
day. The pictures taken for The Bee, re
produced on this page, give an idea of the
- T"" v " f r..- ,,
' ; V; I Cv- "' P :-ri i
,. ' '. I I .
...... . . 1 - J '
"i !
q i . - :,;
i 1 J . .
f - : -V
ii . ) i . xm. - . : . . .
, - . f
t . .. i ' - - - ' '-1
- : :f
1 ' n.-M MMWWWw -..i.- I Wllllll - ...... - i T .r------
PATirFINDEB AND LADY BRIGHT IN THE SLIPS FOR SEMI-FINALS IN THE FUTURITY STAKE LADY
BRIGHT OWNED BY J. V. BAST ELL, DENVER. Copyright Reserved by & D. Butcher.
appearance of the winners In ths Futurity
event and some notion of the crowds that
watched the running.
A Good Guess
Her dearest friend had dropped in for a
call and she straightway put out a five
pound box of expensive candy.
"Oh!" cried the friend, "have you' been
squandering money like that?"
"I didn't squander It," was the reply. "It
was a present to me."
"A present," repeated the friend. "Lefa
see! Who's leen here lately? Any oft1 your
girlhood friends?"
"No."
"Somellme! a family friend, passing
through"
"Not the erne thl time."
"Mrs. Baxter felt very grateful to you
for "
"She didn't (tend t:."
"There was that friend of your husband
that visited 1 ere "
"It didn't come fiom him."
"Oh, 1 know now. You won It on a bet."
"Wrong again. "
"Ha any ld fr!e:id disappointed you at
dinner? Sometimes they try to squara
things-"
"No."
' "Well, I give it up."
"Try guesflng the mo-t unlikely person
In the world, conHldcrlng that it's five
pound of the most expensive candy and
not a little 50 cent box."
"Your husband?"
"Right."
"Heavens! He must have been doing
something awful." Brooklyn Eagle.
hound flecks her, but can not hold her.
In estimating the value of the speed of
the greyhound to the hare, the Judge takes
several things into consideration. These
Include, for instance, the marlta of a lead
Obtained by a dog which has lost ground
at the start, either from being unslghtel
or from a bad slip, or which has had to
run what is known as the outer clrc!e.
Another case would be where one hound
leada the other so long as the hare runs
straight, but loses the lead from the hare
bending around decidedly in favor of the
slower dog of Its own accord, in which
case the one hound shall score one point
for the speed shown and the other dog
score one point for ths first turn. Under
no circumstances Is speed without subse
quent good work allowed to decide a course,
except when great superiority M shown by
one hound over another in a long lead to
cover.
Coursing has long been a favorite sport
to some parts of ths United Btataj, but dur-
1 "I '
Y- - : -
i v
is'----
i '
MI8S,HPD.Ii!! c9NED BT JHN RUSSELU OABIK. 111.. AND NORFOLK, OWNED BY ANGELO
VLR, IN SUl'S FOR SEMI-FINALS IN FUTUHITY.-Copyrlght Reserved by 8. D. Butcher.
NACE, DEN-

xml | txt