OCR Interpretation


Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, November 15, 1903, Image 32

Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99021999/1903-11-15/ed-1/seq-32/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Limbo for Derelict Street Cars
"TT
ir
J
I
i t
77
1 f
1 '
i Y
J
1 1 """ ;
"' t 1 . 11 V-l M-.v -
) V - : - x ;
-. , . .. . 1
,' . v..
! . ..." v ,
ONK OP THE LUNCH STANDS AND ITS PATRONS. Photo by ft Staff Artist
FIRST HORSK CAR THAT RAN ON THE STREETS OF OMAHA
AS IT APPEARS TODAY IN THE OLD BARN NEAR HAN
BOOM PARK.-Photo by a Staff ArUst.
MAHA has hnd street railway ser-
Ol vice for thirty-five years and dur
1 Ini that time has seen a sample
of almoKt every sort of equip
ment ever run on wheels over
tramways. T'hlrty-flve years ago tho line
In service boasted of one car of the '.'bus"
variety; -today several hundred cars of'
many types and various degrees of com
fort ' and convenience are In use on the
linen. In defense of the company, It must
be admitted that ft standard car of goodly
street railway company, like many other
Institutions, was holding- on and fighting
for its life. . '
When prosperity's bright beams again
warmed the currents of local business Into
life, the street railway company began to
plan was abandoned. Other uses were sug
gested for them, and in other ways they
are being utilized, those that remain.
Just at present, the favorite end for the
dlamanteled horse car 13 the Fide walk res
taurant: or. "lunch barge,' as Its patrans
expand and one of the first evidences was ., call It. In 1897 the peripatetic dispenser
In the forn of new cars. Gradually the
trailers disappeared, until now they are
seen on only one line, and there' they are
the heavier and' roomier coaches that were
brought here for the cable service or for .
of tamales and red hots took onto himself
the notion of traveling on wheels. Soon he
had .expanded Into gorgeous wgons, with
stained glass windows and side 4 that would
put ft rainbow to blush. Wfth the passing
proportions and designed for the greatest the first of the trolley lines. The bora ; of the first exposition, In 1893, tjiee too be
t
WAITING ROOK AT JUNCTION OF D UNDEE AND FARNAM LINES. Photo by a Staff Artist
convenience of patron and management la
rapidly superseding the aggregation, that
came of consolidation and experiment.
When the present Omaha Sc .Council Bluffs
8tret, Railway company's .system was
called Into, existence, It was the welding
together of a horse railway, a cable 'tram
way and a trolley line, each with Its own
peculiar style of. vehicle, and a. due re- '
spect for -economy suggested the adaptation,
of the rolling stock as far as possible '
to the uses of the new concern. For ' a
number of years after the consolidation,
the cable cars rolled and Jerked merrily
along In the wake of the grip, but the ,
horn cars were immediately relegated to
such use as oould be made of them on the
trolley lines. ,
First, the dinkey bobtails, of which only
ft few were In service, were abandoned
altogether, but the more pretentious
"double-cndera" became trailers to the
motor cars that whUzed and roared along
Omaha streets after the fall of 1889. Many
of these trailers were put into service Just
as they came from the horse car line, for
ft long time the' fare-box with Its In
junction to the passenger to deposit his
fare in the box Immediately on entering
the oar still occupying a prominent place.
This led to , ft great deal of confusion,
many people conscientiously dropping their
nickels into the box, only to be again
asked to pay fare by the conductor, radi
ant In his new uniform and bright bell
punch. Eventually the fare box went the
way It should have traveled at the very
outset, but the trailer still Jerked and
Jolted Its way over the rails, to the mani
fest and often forcibly expressed dis
pleasure of the passenger and the con
ductor, who was required to "brake" as
wU as take fare on those cars. This
was during the hard times, when tho
car has gone. Just what has become of
all of them could hardly be told by the
officers of the company. Many were re
built once, for uses as motor bodies, being
sawed In two, a section built In the middle
and the new poach mounted on a motor
platform. This didn't ' prove successful,
for the coach body lacked the rigidity nec
essary to withstand the strain of running
over the rails and In a little while the
gan to fade, for the discovery was made by
someone In an Inspired moment that a
street car would make a mucli more sub
stantial If not so gorgeous a lunch stand,
and soon the humble horse car was being
hauled out from Its retirement fitted up
with ft gasoline stove and some dish racks,
and turned Into ft restaurant. 'These have
come to be familiar sights In certain dis
tricts,' and their owners are usually pros-
'"' - -- " ' ' ' " ,
perous and pleased with the result of their
adventure.
- In at least one Instance the company has
benefited by the suggestion and ' at tho
Junction of the Dundee and Farnam street
lines has maintained as a waiting room ft
car that once followed a pair of pranelny
bronchos over the route of the "red line."
Soon this will be done away with, for In a
very little while the Farnam cars will run
through from the South Tenth street ter
minus to the end of the track In Dundee.
The first horse car began Its missionary
work In this city In 1868, and had, no rival
until 1887, when the cable was put in. The
horse cars ran to the depot, to Hanscom
park to Thirteenth and Vinton, to Thirtieth
and Cuming, Twenty-sixth and St. Mary's,
Twenty-sixth and Lake and to Eighteenth
and Lake streets. When the cable lines
were put in they run from Tenth and
Mason, Twentieth and Lake and Thirtieth
and Dodge streets, a'ong Dodge and Har
ney streets. In 1889 began the erection of
the complete electric syBtem' which is In
operation today.
Today Omaha has more than ninety miles
of electric street, car service, combining
eight different lines. The Omaha street
railway Is rated as among the best In the
United States In the matter of equipment
and In the matter of service is second to
none. In other cities the cars are larger,
the stops are longer and the cars do not
travel as fast as here. The local cars are
smaller than those of other cities, but they
Mart off quickly, the cars have no gates
to hamper the passengers In boarding and
alighting and they are more numerous.
By this method a larger number of passen
gers can be carried and the routes can be
traveled faster than with the heavier cars
operated In other cities. ,
While no serious mishaps have marred
the history of the local street raKway,
many singular accidents have occurred. In
discussing these things, W. A. Smith, at
ptesent general manager of the street car
system, said:
' "I think that ft large per cent of tho
accidents are due to the injured party being;
in what we call a state of mind. I can
figure out no other reason why a person
possessed of all his senses will walk right
into ft street car, when its bell Is clanging
(Contineud on Page Sixteen.)
WHERE TWO OLD HORSE CARS MA KB A PALATIAL RESTAURANT. Photo by ft Staff Artist.
.4
if
If

xml | txt