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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, May 07, 1904, PART I, Image 7

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TIIE OMAtlA DAILY BEE: SATURDAY, MAY T, 1904.
THE QUEST
lV SARGENT
c-rryr-Kht, 1W, by A. B. Richardson.) ,
No "ti eirpft Hrry Bancrfft
kave undrrtakf-n the qufrt, hut Harry ai
Tint at all li'te ciher men. His father,
having rrarh-d the financial position whore
h ccuM af7r..-d th? lutury or an eccentric
m. often chuckled orei the fact. Hie
mother, who iTotratcd rwref-lf Calljr be
fore the altar Inscribed 'The Right Thlri.M
irl-vl over his conduct, ecrretlr rl
openly, little dreamir.e; that she pwed her
social position to her sen's feniuc for do
ing the unexpected, the daringly original,
father than to hr hunhaud'e mere ta'.U
llona. Society-wlth a capital S will con-
escend to be amused when It scorns to
be fed.
The quest started In a Fifth avenue stnge
On the nlsrnt of the Ppcncer-Jonee cotillon.
The Bancroft horses were In use, lira.
Bancroft and Helen having Invited the
Courtney srlrls to share tnelr box at the
Xletropolltar. Harry had telephoned the
club, only to learn that there wns not a
hansom on the stand. 60 there wn noth
ing for It but a etape, and Harry j'.gnak-d
the lumbcrlftg reticle with a gr::w!t:g Btr.9
of Irritation at Mrs. Fincer-Jonea for
fcavtng elected a Calve nlftht for her
cotillon, anS at til? perversltv of cahs for
Invariably being scarce on stormy nlRhts.
The stage plunged forward Just ae he
resrhed the top step, nnd he rasped the
crown of Ms hat a he wss precipitated
through th narrow door. His e?owl d-ep-tned
as. with one lmmaculatnly gloved
hanfl, he smoothed the nap. Bancroft hnd
always held that wMle clothes might not
make the man, Ms hat certainly stamped
Ills attire. He gave one last critical glance
t Its polished surface set It tirmly,
'luarely on his head, and once more looked
the world In the face.
And such a fa'-e as the world turned
toward him at tht particular moment
In the dim light of the rwaylng Mge'.
Oval, almost classical In Its outlines, un
der stormy coll of dep gold hMr of that
tint which only Dame Nature, pa.t-;:ils-tress
of coloring, can spin. Purk brown
yes that might be meltingly lender, hut
which Just now were dancing with amuse
Bicnt at his too obvious aunoyance. And
Hps that were gentle even In their
mirth.
Bancroft, the fastidious, noted even the
dress, so inconspicuous that no rlncle de
tail stood forth. Beelr-K that the had at
tracted his attention, the fcirl flushed
lightly and her face turned expression
less. But not before Bancroft, raiding
Ills glance from the tails on her great fox
boa to the coils of spun gold under her
brown velvet hat. caught the delicate flush
as It passed, and, looking, he was loft.
If .Helen did not know this girl. It was
her sisterly duty to mc.Ee the acquaint
ance on the morrow. Girls must know
how to manage these things. If only he
knew her name or address
Then the province which tenderly guards
children, fools and lovers. Intervened. A
middle-aged woman clambered into the
tape. There was a Joyful meeting, from
which the observant Bancroft gathered
that the newcomer had once taught Miss
Ivlnlty, and was greatly surprised to
meet her In New Tork. Bhe called the
girl Alicia, or Miss Bronson, according to
the emotion of the moment, and the
younger woman, in turn, offered the In
formation that she and "papa" were stop
ping at a quiet but fashionably apart
ment hotel near Washington Square,
Under cover of smoothing his mustache,
Bancroft conned the name and address
several times. Then sudden terror pos
sessed' him. His memory, always treach
erous, would lose Its grip on that address
before he reached the coat room at
Sherry's. In desperation he ran through 1
the pockets of his top coat and found the j
tub of. a dance card pencil, but no scrap,
of paper. With a guilty air, quite lost on
Miss Divinity, who was chatting uncon
cernedly with her companion, be scrib
bled the address on the white silk lining of
bis hat, and carefully turned the back band
Father Krteipp devoted
Kis life to the study of
human heaJth. Be de
manded pure linen next
the skirt, and ga.ve kis
name to
the only underwe&r
which is pure linen to
the last thread.
FOB SALE
WILLIAMS & SMITH CO,
MRS. J. BENSON
Nothing
Better
To regain lost strength and vitality
r for nursing mothers or convales
centsfor a tonic or lveruge during
the spring and summer thun
Cabinet
THE BEER YOU LIKE.
It is properly aged and pasteurtted.
One trial is all we ask. Order a
case, either quarts or pints. A small
glassful occasionally will soon bring
doajred results to convalescents.
Fred Krug Brewing Co.
Oawks'i Model Brewery,
-telephone 420. OMAHA.
KENaKDWCMEH.
1 Hi U tot anaatnra.
4it htvr ,io0eviiiaitoii4
if tct naltrtAeVi
Iuu1m, 14 but ulri-
Si i ! I nl
f 1 fr .miimii.
i a,k..uiT! aM tw hMui. .
t. S-. , iPerwui is pi. n wrus I
i1 ea h-iti-sn ts.
CucklM sum tuMasl 1
ECHl(.-MllffO ... ..
f-j&- " rillCUt.viKh'i. KN1.UM1
W I. kill fc-!4 UMitUlr .m. mu4
jx J7"i i.k...ib u. t
71 Spa -l kalMUiail.. .-4 l.iis.
legs B -It.-iiw r,
MS ). SiSM Ku. kl. Z
OF THE HAT
RICHARDSON.
0f the toll-tale ror?.
Then he woke
he wss ceven
, M-v-ks tejew h.s d-i-i.ii.atl m, and. wiih
, a list l...gerli,g l,a at Mjb liviiUty, be
j r'ung"J Into the Inky blackness of the
1 nltbt.
1 Two hours later he looked up to find his I
hostess studying him carefully.
'loruethlng on your mind, Harry?"
"Tes, something pleasant," he replied,
spinning her jeweisd (an, like an Ivory der
visli, on the palm of his band. "You would
laugh if you knew."
.'Tell me, then, quick! I want to laugh!"
"That Is Just why 1 think I hai better
not tell you. I don't want you to laugh at
this."
Soon after he slipped away. Somehow
he wanted to get to the clnb, where there
might be some chaps of the sort who did
not receive cards to the Spencer-Jones af
fairs, but who knew about pretty western
girls whose fathers put up near Washington
Square.
He found the smoking-room at the club
deserted. ' In the dining-room, a farewell
banquet was under way, in honor of a
man who looked distinctly western. Ban
croft caught sentences about a boat to sail
early in the morning, and a long stay
abroad; then with a shrug, he walked Into
the writing-room. Drawing a chair Into
the window recess, he threw himself into
Its leather depths to watch the cabs flash
through the storm and to tlilnk of Miss
Divinity.
Of course, there bad been other 4 vlnlties.
He almost laughed aloud when he recalled
the first one, whose Insipid pink-and-whltenees
had been the power to draw him
to the dancing class, clad all In velvet and
disgustingly girlish lace ruffles. There had
been demure girls, girls whose blush had
been that of the wild rose, girls with coils
of satiny hair, girls with tender mouths
and deep brown eyes, but never had there
been one who could combine all these
graces as did the Lady of the Stage.
In her delicate treatment of the faded,
nervous old teacher he bns read exquisite
womanly sympathy; in her bearing, dignity
and the art of repression; in her eyes,
when aha laughed, that latent sense of
humor which Is the leaven of marital life.
The club rooms were very Quiet when at
last be pulled himself together and ordered
a cab. John, the hall man, handed him
The Hat Bancroft's penchant for new
hats was wull known, and he uld not re
sent John's quiet "Another new one, sir?"
but slipped a crisp note Into the serving
man's hand.
Helen Bancroft laughed at her brother
over the edge of her chocolate cup. It
was nearly noon of the next day and Harry
had been waiting impatiently fur an hour
or more for a word with his sister.
"No, you nued not give :ne the marquise
ring for such a trifle," she. siiid teas) ugly,
"merely promise that I sliall be the maid
of honor. It has been the height of my
ambition to be ui&ld of huiur ui a church
Wedding In a picture hat and carrying a
big ermine muff. Give tue ths name and
address, and I will wager a new starfpin
against the marquise ring that I nieot
Miss Divinity before I have finished my
round of teas this afternoon."
Harry patted her shoulder apptjvlngly
and darted out of the room. It had been
a buppy thought that hut.
He came back with the hut In his hand,
and led Helen triumphantly to the win
dow. "Tills Is where your little brother was
wise for once," he said. "He did not trust
to his poor memory."
But suddenly the look of triumph died
from his face. He uttered a groan, and
Helen clutched his arm.
"What's the matter?"
"Matter? Matter? Everything's ths mat
ter! This Is not my hat!"
Then he told her the whole story.
"That is all right," shs said mockingly.
All you have to do is to go to the club and
find out which man hub a hat with a girl's
name written on the lining."
Her mlschevlous words brought comfort
to the perturbed Bancroft.
"Not a bad Idea. I'm off to the club."
And at the club he found John In the
accustomed place. It was a club tradi
tion that John never slept. Yes John
rememliored the hat (also the tip wlUch he
rijd not mention, bon ever). It was a Ja w
hat. He rrmembered having made fres
to mention the fact to Mr. Bancroft. No,
he didn't thli.k he could have made a
mistake. 1
mistake. He had been tending tUe rack
for years a
ud never made mistakes. Ye,
one other gentleman who had
worn a lie i
v hut the night before. Coma
to tblr.k. it was the same make us Mr.
j Bancroft's. It had been a gentleman with
! Mr. Hanson a' western gentleman. While
i hair, spare figure, about the same height
us Mr. Bancroft. That was why the
I two hats were on the same ruck. He
j cjuld remembtr every hat, cf course, 1 ut
i It he!pd some to have the ull men s hats
I on ttie top reck and ths short men's hats
j underneath. That was bow be aJwajs got
thfm so easily. Ptlll. with the two hats
side tr si 1e, he couM not understand ho
he roui.l rr.ks the mistake. Tex, Mr. Han-
son wan In the rlub houe thl mornlna;.
John thought he had rone li.to tl.e billiard
room.
But Haneon was In the rate. He could
i not understand why Bancroft should t
j so Interested in the friend he had enter-
talned the night before. It was a western
friend, a man by the name of Stroud who
hnd made millions in copper, and was on
his way to Europe. Hid sailed that
morning at S on the City of Chicago. Han
son had been giving him a little send-off
the night before.
TM4 er-hls hat fit him?"
Hanson laughed.
"I can't answer for this morning, but I
know it was all right last nlg-ht. I vas
with him when he bought It yesterday
afternoon."
Bancroft made a dash for the writing
1 room. Now that he had located his man n
wks a simple thing to send a Mar.-onlgram
asking Btroud to csble back the name and
HANDED IT QUIETLT TO BANCROFT.
address in the hat. He bad the message
written, when it suddenly struck him that
It would not do to rouse Stroud's curiosity.
For if luck were with him and he mar
ried Miss Divinity, Btroud might give the
story to some of those inquisitive fellows
on the papers, and then He shuddered
to think of the glaring headlines which
would adorn the tale.
Better a trip across the Atlantic than
that!
He tore up the message and wrote an
other. This time It read:
Sparhawk, London: Meet City Chicago,
Southampton. Do not lose sight John X.
Stroud. BANSON.
Sparhawk was the cable address of Sain
ton's, a noted London detective agency.
Banson represented the firm of James It.
Bancrc't 4 Son.
The cable sent, Bancroft breathed mors
freely. Come what might, at least he was
on the tiail of the hat. Then he sent down
to the steamship offices and enirRKed a
room on the next outgoing boat. The City
of Chicago had sailed at o'clock Thursday
morning. The Teutonic would sail at 10 on
Saturday. This would give Stroud only a
little more than two days' start. And with
Swlnton's men on his heels, ths rest would
be easy.
Ten days later Bancroft stood on the
landing stage at Liverpool. The first per
son he encountered was Swlnton hlmsolf.
"It's all right. Mr. Bancroft." said the
detective. "Your man Is stopping ut the
Carlton. We can nnb him this afternoon,
and have him extradited In time ror Satur
day's boat. I presume it's an extradition
offense?"
Bancroft looked at him in amaicment.
"Good Lord, no!" he answered csrelessly.
"The man's Just got my hat by mistake."
Swlnton sat down suddenly. It cost 30
shillings a day and expenses to trail a
man. A good hat might be purchased for
40. He had received many strange orders
from America, but this certainly was the
oddest ever.
In the carriage enroute for London the
detective strove to secure enlightenment,
but Bancroft had turned suddenly uncom
municative. The man. trained at cross
exBmlnntion, was for once baffled.
Arrived In town, they drove at once to
the hotel. As the four-wheeler rolled up
the Psll Mall to the entrsnce of the Carl
ton, a man who looked as If he mltrht
le waiting for a friend, slipped up to the
detective.
"Johnson's got the man, sir." he said
softly. "I think they're in the cafe."
Down the cafe went Bancroft and Swtn-
. IllllltilJ
liilBiDfl l frhe Short CuTl COiCH ! ,C
ton. The former's rarl gtrt a rtt
, leap s he rwFnised the man he had
at the club. And there on the rack above
him was The Hat Stroud had not notices'
their entrance. He was lowerin at a
man across the wsy who was dallying over
a lemon squash. For fner hours the mat
hal been d.igsing the American's heeis.
! and the latter remembered having seen
the surne person around the day before. Ht
had the unpleasant feellr.g that he was be
ing shadowed.
Bancroft stepped up to his compatriot.
"I beg your pardon," he said, extending
a penciled card from Ear.son, "but I be
lieve you have my hat and youra Is la
my luegage."
If the detevttve had been astonished,
Btroud wss dumbfounded. Throughout his
years of to'l. a trip to Europe had been his
ambition. And here was a man who had
taken the trip merely to recover a hat
picked up by someone by mistake.
When he had recovered sufficiently to
set, he reached for the hat above his head
and handed It silently to Bancroft. Harry
turned down the band with hands that al
most trembled. There on the silk the
name was still legible, "Alicia Bronson."
Stroud accepted his own hat from the
handa of Bancroft's man with supreme In
difference, but he seemed loath to part
with the young American.
"I am glad there Is someone here to
vouch for me," he explained, "for I may
have to send for you. Some fool detective
has twen watching me ever since I landed.
I don't know what they want me for, but
I didn't do It, no matter what It Is. He
Is sitting over there now."
And Stroud pointed to the unfortunate
"shadow" who was still trj'lnK to look
as If he enjoyed a lemon squash when his
thirst cried aloud for Scotch and soda.
Bancroft looked Inquiringly at 8wlnton,
who nodded. Swlnton In turn looked In
quiringly at Bancroft, who also nodded.
A moment later the detective was
free to Indulge his thirst, Bancroft's man
wss standing at attention with his mas
ter's luggsge In hand, ready for the next
move, end the bewildered Swlnton, st a
word from Bancroft, was threading; his
way among the tables.
Stroud put on his hat. then Jerked It
off again, and spoke with a gentleness
and hesitation which would have aston
ished the men who had worked with hira
and for him in Montana.
"London may be all right when you've
been here before and know folks, but It's
darned lonesome when you haven't. If
you wouldn't mind meeting my daughter
and having dinner with us I'd I'd be
damned glad."
Bancroft murmured something sbout the
pleasure of meeting American girls so
far from home. Everything seemed Joyous,
now that he had that name and address
under his thumb. He sent his nun down
to register and followed Stroud to the
lift. They passed before the letter's apart
ment, which Stroud had dubbed ths
English hotel edition de luxe, and the man
who made his money In copper said to
the man whose father had made his money
In IcBd:
"I forgot to tell you her name's not
Btroud. She's my stepdaughter, and I
don't mind sddtng that her mother was a
belle out in good old Montana. Her name's
Bronson, Alicia Bronson, Walk right In I"
Why I'opeers Pops.
Popoorn pops by reason of ths volatlsa-
tlon by heat of the oil contained In the
kernel. Field corn does not pop because
the outer portion of the kernel is more
Iiu uuu 9iiciiwi ana n r M,
vigor is by drinking g iyj r 'fr'ZDvt
Ghlrardelli's j rPT'f''- V
Ground y ffiis'-yX Wyjiw
Chocolate hi m$&Mi
Good at any time for B l ' J -
Alvayfrtk in patent i B l J V S
H krmtieuUy ttaled mm. 1
parvus, pendfe ting ths escape of the o'.l
as It volatilises, bile la ths case of pop
oora a great pressure is developed in the
kernel by the confined oil, end the kernel
is suddenly exploded and turned wrong
side out. Ws ars Indebted for this In
formation to the Department of Agricul
ture of the t'nlted States, but the same
story edght have been got out of a cyclo
pedia or a dictionary, and It would have
eu3t less.- Cincinnati Enquirer.
TRIUMPHS 0F CIVILIZATION
o Tatars the Trwly ProKreeslT
People Haael to tbc Heats b ted
Hcathrau
CHAPTER L
Hs was a free, contented native of a
beautiful Pacific Island; free to come and
go, contented with his simple life and sur
roundings. Worries and troubles he knew
not of. The earth and sea supplied his
wants, and he was happy with his wives
and children and harmless gods.
One morning on waking hs saw a ship
at anchor In the bay and a boat coming
ashore, with a strange looking man wear
ing glasses and carrying many books
seated In the bow. It was a missionary.
"I have coma," said ths representative
of the Foreign Mission society, "to con
vert and civilise you; to drag you out of
the mire of Ignorance. You are a poor,
lost, misorable, wrrtohed, damned sinner.
Forsake your fulso gods and evil, iniquit
ous ways, and Dee from the wrath to coma.
If you will return with me 1 will show
you the manifold blessings and glories of
civilized, enlightened and Christian na
tions." So they mailed away together.
CHAPTER II.
The missionary end his subject for con
version had arrived. Before and around
them spread a panorama. Here an lmmer.ii
fathering of fashionably dressed people
Were piling money on collection plate,
while a sleek, well fed foreign mission
board looked approvingly on. It was fash
ionable. The same grandly dressed gath
ering, on emerging, were seen to draw
their skirts aside, and pass with looks
of disgust and contempt their own needy,
starving country people.
There a bowling, maddened mob, armed
with guns and clubs, was burning a terror
stricken, screaming negro ut the stake.
He was suspected but not proven to be
guilty of crime.
On one side an excited, yelling crowd ap
plauded two men who, on a raised, roped-in
platform, were endeavoring to maim and
knock each other senseless.
Here a huge concourse of people ap
plauded as heroes a number of padded,
bloodthirsty, kicking, tearing warriors, who
savagely jumped on and broke one an
other's limbs whlls chasing a leather ball.
There cockfightfng was in full blast and
live pigeon shooting was being Indulged in,
whlls heartless fiends were tearing llvli;g
snimuls to pieces little by little, in the name
of science.
Feopls were being crushed and burned
In railway tunnels victims to greed.
Fashionable crowds were noticed In gilded
temples offering up prayers, but ou emerg
ing from the houses of worship were he ird
to criticise the wearing apparel of other
worshipers, vilify their neighbors' charac
ters and repeat soandalous stories. The
whole nation groveled before and worshiped
a huge golden Idol, and obeyed the whin
lash of Its master, a bloated trust. Hy
pocrisy, fashion, selfishness and gold
reigned supreme.
"Is this a clvlllred and Christian coun
try?" asked the savage. "It Is," replied
ths missionary.
CHAPTER HI.
The savage hod returned to his beautiful
Island home, and the natives, gathered
about him, were listening with horror
stricken faces to bis experiences In ths
terrible Christian country. "My brothers."
hs continued with tears in his eyes, "a
great and noble work lies bnfore us. Ws
are In duty bound to form ourselves Into a
Foreign Missionary society and raise funds
to send missionaries to these poor white
People. They are our brothers, and we
tnut endeavor to unolvillre, unchrlstianlee
nnd unenllghten them." A. O. Raoey In
Life.
COMPETENT JtDOES.
Beauty Doctors Eadorae Herplrlde.
Women who make s business of beauti
fying other women come pretty near know
trig what will bring about the best re
sults. Here are letters from two, concern
ing Herplclde:
"I can recommend Newhro's "Herplclde,"
ss It stopped my hair from falling out;
and. as a dressing It has no superior.
"(Signed.) Bertha A. Trulllnger,
"Complexion Specialist,
"29H Morrison StPortlend, Ore."
"After using tJhe bottle of "Herplclde'
my hair has stopped falling out, and my
scalp Is entirely free from dandruff.
"(Sigr.ed.) Grace Dodge,
Beauty Doctor,
"195 Sixth St., Portland. Ore."
Sold by leading druggists. Send 10 cents
In stamps for sample to The Herplclde
Co., Detroit, Mich.. Bherman ft McCon
nell Drug Co., special agents.
Ten fres trips to the "World's fair each
week. See coupon on page t
Traveltasr Maa Commits Salride.
ST. LOUIS, Msy . In the presence of
more than a score of men and women.
Paul Moore, a traveling salesman of
Cleveland, O., today shot and killed him
self in a street car at the Intersection of
two of the busiest thoroughfares In the
heart of the business section of the city.
He left a note saying that he comm.t.ed
suicide because he "hud no home, no wile
and nothing to live for."
He left a note requesting that Harry
Rltchey of Cleveland, be notiflod.
Omaha Clothing Co
131 Farnam Street.
X50
Unprecedented sale of remarkable values, In black unfin
ished worsteds, cheviots, etc. Each and every garment
guaranteed.
00
JL o
Usd TaltoraS r T J
two.
WSMSOLO 4 CO. t ,
mm
Copvrtfht isjosx
Caltt. W.mposd s C
tin Security. No Interest.
We Give Green
THE BEST PLACE TO BUY A
K 'ST
MILTON, ROGERS & SONS CO.
j
14th and Fnrnam Streets.
J F YOU WANT A SERVANT the right
kind of a servant don't expect a bright,
well trained girl to rtply to an ad that
reads
M'AKTFTJ, rlrl for rpn'-! rosswork.
Mrs. John Jones, 100b Soma street.
If you want to attract a bright girl say
something to make her feel that yours is the
sort of place she wants. If the family is small
if the wages ore large if she can have more
leisure than in most places or no washing a
pleasant sen-ant's room unr so. That kind of
an ad will bring the right one every time.
KiiIa lotion AlhrS
For bsnerrtKM. tiimt i.ucrrfcai. tparMtor.
rhtM, fiMSine All unhssltii) ttul Ditcosrtss.
NO PAIN NO tTIN.
NO bTSlCTURC. FRtE SYRINGE
-A ksn PimnUt
At lrnssiM. or ut ur w I"' W
IHALYDCR MFB. SC., Lancftfsf, w.,lV
fr.H k rermin.id.d t.y
V 1 I L Mil i. i n ( . . li
HI I1MAS k !.("N- I
.iti ui,lt l'-ay, Pniuhs.
SUIT
SALE
SUIT
The finest suits that ever
has been retailed for ?13.00.
"ot one of tbette suits
sold less than $22.50, includ
ing such makes as
Kirschbaum's,
St rouse Bros' high art
clothing.
Alfred Benjamin & Go's,
mokes.
Furnishings
Slaughtered
Regular $3 and 3.60
hats, all shapes ....$1.50
$1 and $1.50 shirts 500
25c Boston Garters. .. ,15c
50c Underwear ........ 1 9c
50c men's suspenders. . .19c
Men's fancy Hose
2 pair for 250
CASH OR
CREDIT.
Anybody Can Hits Credit.
Trading Stamps.
REFRIGERATOR
Kerer before have we bee a bl to oiler
such big values
Peerless
Whit Enamel Refrigerators
We guarantee absolutely to be
most economical, packed with mlo
ei al wool, the best bargain la town.
Badger Refrigerators C i f
up from 4O.UU
Water Filters, up from $2.93
Water Coolers, up from .... $1.65
ar- !sarsFar,Slt, Waits Skla
ifjT ; ao a BesatifBl CsmjUtxlse,
' Jj 1 sons T.cssms sua1 Isttsr. AS
if .0r . suluwir ud I i .i.bt;f
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